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Popular Carbon Nanotubes News and Current Events, Carbon Nanotubes News Articles.
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Storage wars
One answer to our greenhouse gas challenges may be right under our feet: Soil scientists Oliver Chadwick of UC Santa Barbara and Marc Kramer of Washington State University have found that minerals in soil can hold on to a significant amount of carbon pulled from the atmosphere. (2019-01-02)
Methods and models
It's a well-known fact that the ocean is one of the biggest absorbers of the carbon dioxide emitted by way of human activity. (2019-06-19)
Nano-saturn
Saturn is the second largest planet in our solar system and has a characteristic ring. (2018-06-08)
The science behind the fizz: How the bubbles make the beverage
From popping a bottle of champagne for a celebration to cracking open a soda while watching the Super Bowl, everyone is familiar with fizz. (2018-01-31)
Plant respiration could become a bigger feedback on climate than expected
New research suggests that plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warns that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel burning. (2017-11-17)
Team discovers a significant role for nitrate in the Arctic landscape
Because of the very low nitrate levels found in arctic tundra soil, scientists had assumed that plants in this biome do not use nitrate. (2018-03-23)
Researchers detail carbon output from rivers and streams
Scientists have demonstrated that while most CO2 emitted from small streams is derived from surrounding soils, in-stream respiration becomes a larger proportion of CO2 emissions as rivers become larger. (2015-08-13)
How seafloor weathering drives the slow carbon cycle
A previously unknown connection between geological atmospheric carbon dioxide cycles and the fluctuating capacity of the ocean crust to store carbon dioxide has been uncovered by two geoscientists from the University of Sydney. (2018-02-14)
New chemical method could revolutionize graphene
University of Illinois at Chicago scientists have discovered a new chemical method that enables graphene to be incorporated into a wide range of applications while maintaining its ultra-fast electronics. (2017-06-14)
Charcoal remains could accelerate CO2 emissions after forest fires
Charcoal remains after a forest fire help decompose fine roots in the soil, potentially accelerating CO2 emissions in boreal forests. (2017-12-28)
New principles to guide corporate investment towards climate goals
A new set of principles are needed to address the moral challenge of climate change. (2018-01-04)
NUS scientists develop novel chip for fast and accurate disease detection at low cost
A novel invention by a team of researchers from the National University of Singapore holds promise for a faster and cheaper way to diagnose diseases with high accuracy. (2018-03-29)
Carbon feedback from forest soils will accelerate global warming, 26-year study projects
After 26 years, the world's longest-running experiment to discover how warming temperatures affect forest soils has revealed a surprising, cyclical response: Soil warming stimulates periods of abundant carbon release from the soil to the atmosphere alternating with periods of no detectable loss in soil carbon stores. (2017-10-05)
Startup scales up CNT membranes to make carbon-zero fuels for less than fossil fuels
Mattershift, an NYC startup with alumni from MIT and Yale has achieved a breakthrough in making carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes at large scale. (2018-03-09)
Electrochemistry opens up novel access to important classes of substances
Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany have succeeded in overcoming the problem of electrochemical polymer formation and in developing a sustainable and efficient synthesis strategy for these important products for the first time. (2017-11-17)
First-ever US experiments at new X-ray facility may lead to better explosive modeling
For the first time in the US, time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (TRSAXS) is used to observe ultra-fast carbon clustering and graphite and nanodiamond production in the insensitive explosive Plastic Bonded Explosive (PBX) 9502, potentially leading to better computer models of explosive performance. (2017-11-06)
How a 'shadow zone' traps the world's oldest ocean water
New research from an international team has revealed why the oldest water in the ocean in the North Pacific has remained trapped in a shadow zone around 2km below the sea surface for over 1000 years. (2017-11-10)
Tissue paper sensors show promise for health care, entertainment, robotics
University of Washington engineers have turned tissue paper -- similar to toilet tissue -- into a new kind of wearable sensor that can detect a pulse, a blink of an eye and other human movement. (2018-02-14)
New type of nanowires, built with natural gas heating
A new simple, cost-effective approach that may open up an effective way to make other metallic/semiconducting nanomaterials. (2016-01-30)
Swansea scientists discover greener way of making plastics
A new catalyst that allows for the conversion of the green house gas carbon dioxide to an industrial precursor for many plastics has been developed by scientists in the Energy Safety Research Institute at Swansea University as an alternative to using petroleum raw materials. (2018-04-11)
Scientists of SibFU have found a way to determine the toxicity of nanomaterials
Official website of the Russian Science Foundation reports that a group of scientists from Siberian Federal University and Krasnoyarsk Scientific Center of the SB RAS has developed a bioluminescent enzymatic test system for assessing the toxicity of carbon nanomaterials. (2017-11-02)
Highly efficient photocatalyst capable of carbon dioxide recycling
A research team from Korea has developed titanium dioxide-based photocatalyst with the highest efficiency in the world that converts carbon dioxide into methane. (2017-12-01)
Tiny microbes make a surprisingly big contribution to carbon release
As erosion eats away at Earth's surface, some types of rocks release carbon they contain back into the atmosphere -- and now a new study suggests that microbes play a substantial role in this release. (2018-04-12)
The critical importance of mangroves to ocean life
Mangrove plants, whose finger-like roots are known to protect coastal wetlands against the ocean and as important fish habitats, cover less than 0.1 percent of the global land surface yet account for a tenth of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that flows from land to the ocean. (2006-02-27)
Wood pellets: Renewable, but not carbon neutral
A return to firewood is bad for forests and the climate. (2018-03-22)
Adding hydrogen to graphene
IBS researchers report a fundamental study of how graphene is hydrogenated. (2016-11-03)
World's first animals caused global warming
The evolution of Earth's first animals more than 500 million years ago caused global warming, new research shows. (2018-07-02)
Ink from ancient Egyptian papyri contains copper
Until recently, it was assumed that the ink used for writing was primarily carbon-based at least until the fourth and fifth centuries AD. (2017-11-10)
Assessing carbon capture technology
Carbon capture and storage could be used to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and thus ameliorate their impact on climate change. (2016-02-17)
NASA telescope studies quirky comet 45P
When comet 45P zipped past Earth early in 2017, researchers observing from NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility, or IRTF, in Hawai'i gave the long-time trekker a thorough astronomical checkup. (2017-12-05)
Locked in a forest
Argonne researchers have found that in the next 100 years, already existing reforestation in the country could help topsoil absorb an additional 2 billion tons of carbon. (2018-03-09)
Researchers use recycled carbon fiber to improve permeable pavement
A Washington State University research team is solving a high-tech waste problem while addressing the environmental challenge of stormwater run-off. (2018-03-01)
WSU researcher sees huge carbon sink in soil minerals
A Washington State University researcher has discovered that vast amounts of carbon can be stored by soil minerals more than a foot below the surface. (2017-11-08)
Running on renewables: How sure can we be about the future?
A variety of models predict the role renewables will play in 2050, but some may be over-optimistic, and should be used with caution, say researchers. (2018-03-06)
Greenhouse gas 'feedback loop' discovered in freshwater lakes
Latest research finds plant debris in lake sediment affects methane emissions. (2018-05-04)
'Nanonet' circuits closer to making flexible electronics reality
Researchers have overcome a major obstacle in producing transistors from networks of carbon nanotubes, a technology that could make it possible to print circuits on plastic sheets for applications including flexible displays and an electronic skin to cover an entire aircraft to monitor crack formation. (2008-07-23)
A new way to atomically thin materials
Metallic conductivity and hydrophilicity of MXenes have established them as electrodes in rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, as well as other applications, including photothermal cancer therapy, electromagnetic shielding, water purification and gas sensing. (2018-04-04)
Running away from carbon dioxide: The terminal connection
Like us, fish need oxygen, and swimming through a patch of carbon dioxide turns out not to be a pleasant experience. (2018-01-30)
Even without the clean power plan, US can achieve Paris Agreement emissions reductions
Carnegie Mellon University researchers have calculated that the US can meet -- or even beat -- the near-term carbon dioxide emission reductions required by the United Nations Paris Agreement, despite the Trump Administration's withdrawal of the Clean Power Plan (CPP). (2018-02-16)
Strong carbon fiber artificial muscles can lift 12,600 times their own weight
Some Illinois researchers working on artificial muscles are seeing results even the fittest individuals would envy, designing muscles capable of lifting up to 12,600 times their own weight. (2018-04-17)
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