Popular Cardiac Arrest News and Current Events

Popular Cardiac Arrest News and Current Events, Cardiac Arrest News Articles.
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Wearable defibrillators may be an alternative to surgically implanted device for children with certain heart rhythm disorders
Study finds external wearable defibrillators are safe and effective in children with ventricular heart rhythm disorders that put them at risk for sudden cardiac death. The wearable devices may provide a reliable alternative to surgically implanted defibrillators in patients who cannot have surgically placed devices or who do not need them long term. (2018-06-26)

Scientists uncover why sauna bathing is good for your health
Scientists at the University of Eastern Finland have shown that sauna bathing is associated with a variety of health benefits. Using an experimental setting this time, the research group now investigated the physiological mechanisms through which the heat exposure of sauna may influence a person's health. Their latest study with 100 test subjects shows that taking a sauna bath of 30 minutes reduces blood pressure and increases vascular compliance, while also increasing heart rate similarly to medium-intensity exercise. (2018-01-05)

A 'virtual heart' to simulate arrhythmia
A group of researchers from MIPT and Ghent University have proposed a mathematical model which is able to determine the factors responsible for the formation of different fibrosis patterns, which are believed to cause arrhythmia. To reproduce the formation of cardiac tissue, the researchers took a mathematical model -- one that is widely applied to study tissue growth -- and optimized it using the previously collected experimental data. (2017-09-06)

Technology-based process boosts cardiac rehab referral rates
Simply changing cardiac referral processes to opt-out rather than opt-in significantly increased referral rates, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's NCDR Annual Conference (NCDR.18) in Orlando. The technology-based program also provides resources to staff and patients about the significance and impact of cardiac rehab. (2018-03-07)

Tissue engineering advance reduces heart failure in model of heart attack
Researchers have grown heart tissue by seeding a mix of human cells onto a 1-micron-resolution scaffold made with a 3-D printer. The cells organized themselves in the scaffold to create engineered heart tissue that beats synchronously in culture. When the human-derived heart muscle patch was surgically placed onto a mouse heart after a heart attack, it significantly improved heart function and decreased the amount of dead heart tissue. (2017-01-25)

Scientists take aging cardiac stem cells out of semiretirement to improve stem cell therapy
With age, the chromosomes of our cardiac stem cells compress as they move into a state of safe, semiretirement. (2016-10-03)

New tool predicts risk of heart attack in older surgery patients
A tool designed to more accurately predict the risk of heart attack in older patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery works significantly better than traditional risk assessment tools. By having more accurate information, older patients and their physicians can make an informed decision on whether to undergo surgery. (2017-11-16)

When a child's heart stops, onset time of abnormal rhythms is crucial
Ventricular fibrillation, the life-threatening disordered heart rhythms that may accompany full cardiac arrest, occurs more frequently in children than commonly believed, according to a large national pediatric study. Furthermore, not all ventricular fibrillation (VF) is the same. VF is more often fatal if it is not the initial heart rhythm detected at the start of cardiac arrest, but instead develops later during the arrest, typically during resuscitation. (2006-05-31)

Latinos less aware of automated external defibrillators
Latinos are less likely to know what an automated external defibrillator (AED) is and who can use it, which could affect outcomes of sudden cardiac arrests in Latino neighborhoods, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians. (2017-11-11)

Obesity, other risks play large role in sudden cardiac arrest among the young
Obesity and other common cardiovascular risk factors may play a greater role in sudden cardiac arrest among younger people than previously recognized, underscoring the importance of earlier screening, a Cedars-Sinai study has found. (2018-02-12)

Impact of misunderstanding genetic tests for heart conditions
Patients who undergo genetic testing for inherited heart disease need to be better informed to know how to interpret the results and understand the impact the results will have on their life, a University of Sydney study has found. (2018-02-23)

Virtual coaches, fitness trackers help patients stay fit after cardiac rehab
A 12-week mobile health, or mHealth, program not only kept cardiac rehab patients from losing ground, it appeared to help them maintain and even gain fitness. (2018-03-15)

Northeastern researchers identify 36 new genes implicated in cardiac disease
A Northeastern University professor has developed a new personalized method to discover genes implicated in complex diseases. One of the ultimate goals of the research is to create personalized therapeutic drugs to reverse heart disease. (2018-03-07)

A new algorithm designed to make cardiopulmonary resuscitation more effective
Researchers in the UPV/EHU's Signal and Communications Group in collaboration with researchers in the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) have developed an algorithm to guide an effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation manoeuvre. Based on chest acceleration, it calculates the depth and frequency at which the chest compressions are being performed. The prestigious PLOS ONE journal reports on the research by publishing a validation of the algorithm with acceleration signals recorded during actual instances of cardiorespiratory arrest. (2018-03-15)

Hand grip strength may be associated with cardiac function and structure
Better hand grip strength may be associated with cardiac functions and structures that help reduce the risk of cardiovascular incidents, according to a study published March 14, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sebastian Beyer and Steffen Petersen from the Queen Mary University of London, UK, and colleagues. (2018-03-14)

Older adults with heart disease can become more independent and heart healthy with physical activity
Improving physical function among older adults with heart disease helps heart health and even the oldest have a better quality of life and greater independence. Healthcare providers should emphasize cardiac rehabilitation when appropriate and provide individualized guidance on increasing daily physical activities for older patients with heart disease. (2017-03-23)

Re-interventions are common in long-term survivors of childhood heart operation
Among patients who undergo childhood heart surgery for the severe birth defect single-ventricle disease, two-thirds of survivors require a surgical or catheter-based procedure within 20 years. Pediatric cardiology researchers note that doctors should counsel families about the likelihood of re-interventions. (2017-09-18)

New model estimates odds of events that trigger sudden cardiac death
A new computational model of heart tissue allows researchers to estimate the probability of rare heartbeat irregularities that can cause sudden cardiac death. The model, developed by Mark Walker and colleagues from Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and IBM Research, Yorktown Heights, N.Y., is presented in PLOS Computational Biology. (2017-11-16)

Increase in biomarker linked with increased risk of heart disease, heart failure, death
In a study published online by JAMA Cardiology, Elizabeth Selvin, Ph.D., M.P.H., of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, and colleagues examined the association of six-year change in high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T with incident coronary heart disease, heart failure and all-cause mortality. (2016-06-08)

Heart-muscle patches made with human cells improve heart attack recovery
Large, human cardiac-muscle patches created in the lab have been tested, for the first time, on large animals in a heart attack model. This clinically relevant approach showed that the patches significantly improved recovery from heart attack injury. The results are a step closer to the goal of treating human heart attacks by suturing cardiac-muscle patches over an area of dead heart muscle in order to reduce the pathology that often leads to heart failure. (2018-01-10)

Computed tomography provides anatomy -- we need ischemia!
CTA may facilitate management of symptomatic patients with low pre-test likelihood of CAD, in particular by conclusively showing absence of CAD. However, testing for inducible ischemia remains central for management decisions in both suspected and proven CAD and cannot be replaced by morphologic information. The use of CTA as a screening test for CAD in asymptomatic patients -- discouraged by current recommendations anyway -- should be abandoned. (2008-08-31)

Depression and anxiety can double chances of heart ailments
Matters of the mind can affect matters of the heart. A new study by McGill University and University of Montreal researchers has found that major anxiety and/or depression, can double a coronary artery disease patient's chances of repeated heart ailments. This is one of the first studies to focus on patients with stable coronary artery disease -- not those who were hospitalized for events such as a heart attack. (2008-01-18)

Vitamin D may help prevent heart failure after heart attack
New research has shown how vitamin D may help protect heart tissue and prevent heart failure after a heart attack, potentially offering a low-cost addition to existing treatments for heart failure. (2018-03-08)

Linking heart attack damage to the spleen and kidney, an integrated study of heart failure
Ganesh Halade, who uses a mouse heart attack model to research ways to prevent heart failure, has published a functional and structural compendium of the simultaneous changes taking place in the heart, spleen and kidneys in mice during the period of acute heart failure immediately following a heart attack and during the longer period of chronic heart failure that comes next. (2017-11-15)

ADHD medication linked to slightly increased risk of heart rhythm problems
Use of methylphenidate in children and young people with ADHD is associated with a slightly increased risk of abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia) shortly after the start of treatment, suggests research published by The BMJ today. (2016-05-31)

Cardiac events, stroke lead to loss of work, reduced income in survivors of working age
People who have experienced a heart attack (myocardial infarction), stroke or cardiac arrest are significantly less likely to be working than healthy people, and if they are working, on average have lower incomes, found a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-01-07)

People with disabilities more likely to be arrested
People with disabilities face all sorts of discrimination every day. New Cornell University research suggests they may also face it while interacting with the police. (2017-11-30)

Moderate alcohol consumption in middle age can lower cardiac risk
Previous studies have pointed out the benefits of moderate alcohol consumption as a factor in lowering cardiovascular risk. In a study conducted by the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina and published in the March 2008 issue of the American Journal of Medicine, researchers found that middle-aged nondrinkers who began consuming moderate amounts of alcohol saw an immediate benefit of lower cardiac disease morbidity with no change in mortality after four years. (2008-03-07)

Screening programs unlikely to prevent sudden cardiac arrest in competitive athletes
Screening programs for cardiac conditions are not an effective way to prevent sudden cardiac arrest in competitive sport, and may prevent healthy athletes from participating, a new study suggests. (2017-11-15)

Developing depression after a heart attack increases one's risk of death or readmission
In a new study scheduled for publication in the Oct. 15 issue of Biological Psychiatry, researchers report that only episodes of depression that commenced after the coronary event were associated with increased cardiac-related morbidity and mortality, but that this increased risk was substantial. (2008-10-22)

Harvard researchers publish MRI images of genes in action in the living brain
Biologists have just confirmed what poets have known for centuries: eyes really are windows of the soul -- or at least of the brain. In a new study published in the April 2008 print issue of the FASEB Journal, Harvard researchers describe the development of gene probe eye drops that -- for the first time -- make it possible to monitor and detect tissue repair in the brain of living organisms using MRI. (2008-03-31)

Activity monitors only effective when users set goals
The activity monitors that many received as holiday gifts won't automatically make their recipients active or healthy, new research indicates. However, trackers can have a significant impact when users establish clearly defined objectives. (2018-01-08)

Can stem cells help a diseased heart heal itself? Researcher achieves important milestone
A team of Rutgers scientists have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves -- a new model that would reduce the need for bypass surgery, heart transplants or artificial pumping devices. (2018-12-14)

Brain cell powerhouses appear good treatment target for stroke, TBI recovery
Cell powerhouses are typically long and lean, but with brain injury such as stroke or trauma, they can quickly become bloated and dysfunctional, say scientists who documented the phenomena in real time for the first time in a living brain. (2017-01-09)

Telemonitoring in cardiac disorders: Benefit still unclear
The data showed no relevant differences for some outcome criteria, and data were missing for others -- also because some studies remain incompletely published. (2018-03-09)

The giant wave that marks the beginning of the end -- the neurobiology of dying
The human brain is highly sensitive to oxygen deprivation. Extensive and irreversible damage occurs within approximately 10 minutes of cardiac (and hence circulatory) arrest. For the first time, researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the University of Cincinnati have been able to study these events in humans. The results from this research, which has been published in Annals of Neurology*, may inform future treatment strategies of cardiac arrest and stroke. (2018-02-26)

Mitochondrial protein in cardiac muscle cells linked to heart failure, study finds
Reducing a protein found in the mitochondria of cardiac muscle cells initiates cardiac dysfunction and heart failure, a finding that could provide insight for new treatments for cardiovascular diseases, a study led by Georgia State University has shown. (2017-12-05)

Lower levels of microRNA 29 may protect from cardiac fibrosis rather than causing it
Cardiac fibrosis involves an increase of connective tissue in the cardiac muscle, causing a loss of function. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now discovered that fibrosis occurs less frequently when microRNA 29 (miR-29) is suppressed in cardiac muscle cells. Older studies had suggested that it was in fact low levels of miR-29 that caused fibrosis. The new insights point to potential new approaches for developing drugs against fibrotic diseases. (2017-11-22)

How much can watching hockey stress your heart?
A new study suggests that both the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat can have a substantial effect on the cardiovascular system. Investigators took the pulse of fans during a hockey game and found that on average, their heart rate increased by 75 percent when watching on TV, and by a whopping 110 percent (more than doubled, equivalent to the cardiac stress with vigorous exercise) when watching in person. (2017-10-05)

New heart attack test better informs of underlying condition
A new blood test developed by a University of Alberta physician promises to eliminate the guesswork clinicians face with an apparent heart attack. (2018-03-15)

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