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Popular Cardiac Death News and Current Events, Cardiac Death News Articles.
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Heart attack risk increases with six-month dual antiplatelet therapy
The combined rate of death from any cause, heart attack or stroke within 18 months was not significantly different in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who were randomly assigned to receive dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) for either six months or at least 12 months after receiving a drug-eluting stent. (2018-03-12)

Increase in biomarker linked with increased risk of heart disease, heart failure, death
In a study published online by JAMA Cardiology, Elizabeth Selvin, Ph.D., M.P.H., of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, and colleagues examined the association of six-year change in high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T with incident coronary heart disease, heart failure and all-cause mortality. (2016-06-08)

1 in 10 suicide attempt risk among friends and relatives of people who die by suicide
People bereaved by the sudden death of a friend or family member are 65 percent more likely to attempt suicide if the deceased died by suicide than if they died by natural causes. This brings the absolute risk up to 1 in 10, reveals new UCL research funded by the Medical Research Council. (2016-01-26)

Vitamin D may help prevent heart failure after heart attack
New research has shown how vitamin D may help protect heart tissue and prevent heart failure after a heart attack, potentially offering a low-cost addition to existing treatments for heart failure. (2018-03-08)

Exercise after a heart attack -- it could save your life
Becoming more physically active after a heart attack reduces the risk of death, according to research presented today at EuroPrevent 2018, a European Society of Cardiology congress. The study, which followed more than 22,000 patients, found that those who became more physically active after a heart attack halved the risk of death within four years. (2018-04-19)

Cardiac events, stroke lead to loss of work, reduced income in survivors of working age
People who have experienced a heart attack (myocardial infarction), stroke or cardiac arrest are significantly less likely to be working than healthy people, and if they are working, on average have lower incomes, found a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-01-07)

Bacterial pneumonia far more dangerous to the heart than viral pneumonia, study finds
Heart complications in patients diagnosed with bacterial pneumonia are more serious than in patients diagnosed with viral pneumonia, according to new research. (2018-11-11)

Cooking with coal, wood, or charcoal associated with cardiovascular death
Long-term use of coal, wood, or charcoal for cooking is associated with an increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease, according to a study presented today at ESC Congress 2018. (2018-08-26)

Linking heart attack damage to the spleen and kidney, an integrated study of heart failure
Ganesh Halade, who uses a mouse heart attack model to research ways to prevent heart failure, has published a functional and structural compendium of the simultaneous changes taking place in the heart, spleen and kidneys in mice during the period of acute heart failure immediately following a heart attack and during the longer period of chronic heart failure that comes next. (2017-11-15)

Middle-aged couch potatoes may reverse heart effects of a sedentary life with exercise training
Two years of exercise training during middle age may reduce or reverse the cardiac consequences of a sedentary lifestyle. Two years of exercise training may be an effective lifestyle modification for rejuvenating aging hearts and reducing the risk of heart failure. (2018-01-08)

Can stem cells help a diseased heart heal itself? Researcher achieves important milestone
A team of Rutgers scientists have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves -- a new model that would reduce the need for bypass surgery, heart transplants or artificial pumping devices. (2018-12-14)

Depression and anxiety can double chances of heart ailments
Matters of the mind can affect matters of the heart. A new study by McGill University and University of Montreal researchers has found that major anxiety and/or depression, can double a coronary artery disease patient's chances of repeated heart ailments. This is one of the first studies to focus on patients with stable coronary artery disease -- not those who were hospitalized for events such as a heart attack. (2008-01-18)

Computed tomography provides anatomy -- we need ischemia!
CTA may facilitate management of symptomatic patients with low pre-test likelihood of CAD, in particular by conclusively showing absence of CAD. However, testing for inducible ischemia remains central for management decisions in both suspected and proven CAD and cannot be replaced by morphologic information. The use of CTA as a screening test for CAD in asymptomatic patients -- discouraged by current recommendations anyway -- should be abandoned. (2008-08-31)

Moderate alcohol consumption in middle age can lower cardiac risk
Previous studies have pointed out the benefits of moderate alcohol consumption as a factor in lowering cardiovascular risk. In a study conducted by the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina and published in the March 2008 issue of the American Journal of Medicine, researchers found that middle-aged nondrinkers who began consuming moderate amounts of alcohol saw an immediate benefit of lower cardiac disease morbidity with no change in mortality after four years. (2008-03-07)

Infant death study reveals dangerous sleep practices among babysitters, relatives, others
Babies who died during their sleep while being watched by someone other than parents often had been placed in unsafe sleep positions, such as on their stomachs, or in unsafe locations, such as a couch, a new study has found. (2018-04-02)

Activity monitors only effective when users set goals
The activity monitors that many received as holiday gifts won't automatically make their recipients active or healthy, new research indicates. However, trackers can have a significant impact when users establish clearly defined objectives. (2018-01-08)

Artificial intelligence could prevent unneeded tests in patients with stable chest pain
Artificial intelligence (AI) could prevent unnecessary diagnostic tests in patients with stable chest pain, according to research presented today at ICNC 2019. A decision support system saved one hour of testing per patient. (2019-05-12)

Genetic heart diseases cause fewer SIDS deaths than previously thought, study finds
Genetic mutations linked to heart disease have been considered a leading cause of sudden infant death syndrome, but a new study by Mayo Clinic, British and Danish researchers finds they are to blame for far fewer SIDS deaths than previously thought. The findings are opening new lines of inquiry into possible causes of the syndrome and may help prevent unnecessary genetic testing of surviving family members. The study results appear in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2018-03-12)

More sensitive blood test diagnoses heart attacks faster
A new high-sensitivity blood test for heart attacks successfully diagnosed heart attacks faster and more accurately in the emergency room than the existing test. (2018-08-06)

Racial differences in link between depression and early death in kidney disease patients
In white patients with chronic kidney disease, those with depressive symptoms had a higher risk of early death than those without depressive symptoms. This risk was much lower after accounting for use of anti-depressants, however. In black patients, the presence of depressive symptoms was not linked to risk of death. Results from the study will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2017 Oct. 31-Nov. 5 at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, La. (2017-11-04)

Screening programs unlikely to prevent sudden cardiac arrest in competitive athletes
Screening programs for cardiac conditions are not an effective way to prevent sudden cardiac arrest in competitive sport, and may prevent healthy athletes from participating, a new study suggests. (2017-11-15)

New 'atlas' of human heart cells first step toward precision treatments for heart disease
Scientists have for the first time documented all of the different cell types and genes expressed in the healthy human heart, in research published in the journal Nature. Cardiologists from the Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute at the University of Alberta joined teams from Cambridge, Boston and Berlin to use state-of-the-art analytical techniques to sequence the ribonucleic acids (RNA) in nine types of single cells from six regions of the heart. (2020-09-24)

ESC Guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral arterial diseases published today
European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Diseases, developed in collaboration with the European Society for Vascular Surgery (ESVS), are published online today in European Heart Journal,1 European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, and the ESC website. (2017-08-26)

Emotional support is key for stroke patients, research suggests
Doctors caring for severe stroke patients need to take account of their psychological needs and help prepare families for the possibility that they may not recover, a study suggests. (2018-03-09)

Developing depression after a heart attack increases one's risk of death or readmission
In a new study scheduled for publication in the Oct. 15 issue of Biological Psychiatry, researchers report that only episodes of depression that commenced after the coronary event were associated with increased cardiac-related morbidity and mortality, but that this increased risk was substantial. (2008-10-22)

Mitochondrial protein in cardiac muscle cells linked to heart failure, study finds
Reducing a protein found in the mitochondria of cardiac muscle cells initiates cardiac dysfunction and heart failure, a finding that could provide insight for new treatments for cardiovascular diseases, a study led by Georgia State University has shown. (2017-12-05)

Telemonitoring in cardiac disorders: Benefit still unclear
The data showed no relevant differences for some outcome criteria, and data were missing for others -- also because some studies remain incompletely published. (2018-03-09)

Correlation of stroke and dementia with death: A study from the Swedish dementia registry
Patients who died of IS the most common type of dementia was vascular dementia while those died from other causes were most often diagnosed with Alzheimer's dementia (AD). Patients who died from IS and were registered in Riksstroke had higher MMSE score compared to other groups. Patients who died from IS took more cardiovascular medications. There were no differences in the use of antipsychotics, antidepressants, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, anxiolytics, or hypnotics between the groups. (2018-12-14)

New heart attack test better informs of underlying condition
A new blood test developed by a University of Alberta physician promises to eliminate the guesswork clinicians face with an apparent heart attack. (2018-03-15)

Lower levels of microRNA 29 may protect from cardiac fibrosis rather than causing it
Cardiac fibrosis involves an increase of connective tissue in the cardiac muscle, causing a loss of function. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now discovered that fibrosis occurs less frequently when microRNA 29 (miR-29) is suppressed in cardiac muscle cells. Older studies had suggested that it was in fact low levels of miR-29 that caused fibrosis. The new insights point to potential new approaches for developing drugs against fibrotic diseases. (2017-11-22)

What happens to a dying cell's corpse? New findings illuminate an old problem
Scientists have discovered a curious way for cells to die. In studying it, they are learning about how remnants of diseased cells are normally chewed up and removed. (2018-03-19)

What does 'dead' mean?
Marking the 50-year legacy of a landmark Harvard report on brain death, a new special report published by The Hastings Center examines lingering questions about the definition of death, implications for organ transplantation, and lessons from the case of Jahi McMath. (2019-01-04)

Targeted drug therapy prevents exercise-induced arrhythmias
Researchers report this week in Nature Medicine that the clinically available drug flecainide prevents potentially lethal arrhythmias in patients with a specific type of exercise or stress-induced arrhythmia disorder called CPVT. (2009-03-29)

How much can watching hockey stress your heart?
A new study suggests that both the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat can have a substantial effect on the cardiovascular system. Investigators took the pulse of fans during a hockey game and found that on average, their heart rate increased by 75 percent when watching on TV, and by a whopping 110 percent (more than doubled, equivalent to the cardiac stress with vigorous exercise) when watching in person. (2017-10-05)

Penn study finds men are more likely to receive CPR in public than women
When it comes to your likelihood of receiving bystander CPR if you experience a Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) in public, it turns out your gender may play a lifesaving role. According to a new study from researchers in the Center for Resuscitation Science at Penn Medicine, which is being presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2017, men are more likely to receive bystander CPR in public than women. (2017-11-11)

The giant wave that marks the beginning of the end -- the neurobiology of dying
The human brain is highly sensitive to oxygen deprivation. Extensive and irreversible damage occurs within approximately 10 minutes of cardiac (and hence circulatory) arrest. For the first time, researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the University of Cincinnati have been able to study these events in humans. The results from this research, which has been published in Annals of Neurology*, may inform future treatment strategies of cardiac arrest and stroke. (2018-02-26)

Virtual reality technology transforming cardiovascular medicine
Rapid advancements in the field of virtual reality are leading to new developments in cardiovascular treatment and improved outcomes for patients, according to a review paper published today in JACC: Basic to Translational Science. Extended reality applications in cardiac care include education and training, pre-procedural planning, visualization during a procedure and rehabilitation in post-stroke patients. (2018-06-25)

Excess fat disrupts heart cell's energy system
A University of Iowa study finds that lipid overload in heart cells, a common feature in diabetes and obesity, leads to misshapen mitochondria that don't produce energy efficiently. This structural disruption may contribute to the two- to five-fold increased risk of heart failure in people with diabetes. (2018-01-05)

Daily stresses can trigger heart abnormalities during everyday life
Such common emotions as tension, frustration and sadness trigger frequent and painless heart abnormalities that can lead to permanent heart damage, a research team at Duke University Medical Center has concluded (1997-05-21)

Road deaths almost 400 times greater than those from international terrorism
The death toll from car crashes in developed countries is almost 400 times greater than the number of deaths caused by international terrorism, reports a study in the latest issue of Injury Prevention. In 2001 as many people died every 26 days on US roads as died in the terrorist bombings of 9/11, the study shows. (2005-11-30)

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