Popular Caregivers News and Current Events

Popular Caregivers News and Current Events, Caregivers News Articles.
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Dementia on the downslide, especially among people with more education
In a hopeful sign for the health of the nation's brains, the percentage of American seniors with dementia is dropping, a new study finds. The downward trend has emerged despite something else the study shows: a rising tide of three factors that are thought to raise dementia risk by interfering with brain blood flow, namely diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity. Those with the most years of education had the lowest chances of developing dementia. (2016-11-21)

Provide stroke patients with palliative care support minus the label
When caring for stroke patients, health care providers should focus on the social and emotional issues facing patients, rather than only physical rehabilitation, according to a new study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-03-05)

McLean researchers uncover security issues with health apps for dementia patients
In a recent paper, a team of McLean Hospital researchers reported that many health apps designed to assist dementia patients and their caregivers have inadequate security policies or lack security policies altogether. (2017-08-21)

Physical abuse and punishment impact children's academic performance
A Penn State researcher and her collaborator found that physical abuse was associated with decreases in children's cognitive performance, while non-abusive forms of physical punishment were independently associated with reduced school engagement and increased peer isolation. (2017-09-29)

Study: Struggling to get your kids to eat healthy? 'Don't give up!' UB researchers say
Varied diets and persistence in exposing infants and children to healthy foods, even when they don't like them at first, are key to promoting healthy eating behaviors, a new review paper has concluded. (2017-12-20)

3-D printing is transforming care for congenital heart disease
3-D printing is an emerging technology that is impacting the way cardiologists treat patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), according to a review paper published today in JACC: Basic to Translational Science. (2018-04-30)

Babies' babbling betters brains, language
Babies are adept at getting what they need -- including an education. New research shows that babies organize mothers' verbal responses, which promotes more effective language instruction, and infant babbling is the key. (2018-01-18)

Report outlines priorities to improve the lives of cancer survivors and caregivers
A new report from the American Cancer Society creates a set of critical priorities for care delivery, research, education, and policy to equitably improve survivor outcomes and support caregivers. (2018-10-30)

Lack of vegetable choices in infant and toddler food is widespread
The inability to foster children's taste for dark green vegetables is related to a lack of commercially prepared single-vegetable products, according to a new study led by researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine on the Anschutz Medical Campus. (2018-04-10)

A research study analyzes the mental health care community model
Results from the citizen science project 'Juegos x la salud mental', that analyzes interactions in the community formed by people with mental health problems, their family members, and caregivers, were presented and appeared in the journal Scientific Reports. This project, in which Universidad Carlos III de Madrid participated, has been carried out by Universitat de Barcelona (UB) and Federació de Salut Mental Catalunya (Catalonia Mental Health Federation) in collaboration with the Universitat Rovira i Virgili y Abacus. (2018-03-08)

Trauma support for welfare recipients helps them earn more
Research shows that addressing Welfare recipients' past and current trauma help them earn more at their jobs -- providing hope for an exit from the program. (2018-01-26)

Toddler formulas and milks -- not recommended by health experts -- mislead with health claims
Misleading labeling on formulas and milks marketed as 'toddler drinks' may confuse parents about their healthfulness or necessity, finds a new study by researchers at the NYU College of Global Public Health and the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity at the University of Connecticut. (2018-02-05)

Caregivers face strain when patients receive heart pumps
When heart failure patients receive a heart pumping device known as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD), their caregivers seem to suffer, too -- at least initially, according to research in Journal of the American Heart Association (JAHA), the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. (2018-03-07)

Core elements identified for successful transitions in care for older adults with dementia
While there has been an increased focus on person-centered models of care transition for cognitively intact older adults from hospital to home, little is known about the core elements of successful transitions in care specifically for persons with dementia. (2018-03-15)

Correlation between secondhand marijuana and tobacco smoke exposure and children ED visits
Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit substance in the US. Secondhand marijuana smoke (SHMS) exposure and its subsequent impact on child health have not been studied. The objective of this study was to determine association between SHMS exposure and rates of emergency department visitation, and rates of tobacco sensitive conditions (asthma, otitis media and viral respiratory infections). (2018-05-05)

Moms of obese children use different words to restrict eating
Mothers of children with obesity may be more likely to use direct statements to restrict a child's eating. (2018-01-09)

Stroke survivors and caregivers feel abandoned by health services, study finds
A systematic review of studies focused on stroke survivors' and carers' experiences of primary care and community healthcare services has found that they feel abandoned because they have become marginalised by services and do not have the knowledge or skills to re-engage. (2018-02-22)

Brief psychotherapy benefits women caring for children with severe health issues
Brief cognitive behavioral therapy significantly improved the mental health of women overwhelmed by caring for children with severe chronic health conditions, researchers at the University of Louisville have found. After five therapy sessions, study participants reported significantly decreased depressive symptoms, negative thinking and chronic stressors, and experienced improved sleep quality, according to Lynne Hall, Dr.P.H., R.N., associate dean of research and professor at the UofL School of Nursing. (2018-09-14)

Campaign increases likelihood parents will ask about guns before a playdate
The Asking Saves Kids (ASK) campaign is effective in increasing parents' comfort level in asking if there is a gun where their child plays, according to research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2017 National Conference & Exhibition in Chicago Monday, Sept. 18. (2017-09-15)

Food insecurity screening works, but social stigma stands in its way
Screening for food insecurity is effective, a Drexel study found, but red tape and fears of being declared unfit parents often keep help from coming. (2018-02-27)

Novel blueprint for faster implementation of more evidence-based healthcare solutions
Indiana University and Regenstrief Institute investigators have developed and tested Agile Implementation -- a catalytic platform for transforming the current healthcare delivery system (HC 1.0) into a patient and family centric, high reliability, learning healthcare delivery system (HC 2.0). 'Agile Implementation: A Blueprint for Implementing Evidence-Based Healthcare Solutions' is published online ahead of print in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (2018-03-26)

Research finds connecting patients with their community could transform healthcare
Engaging a wider range of resources to connect patients with organizations within their community can help transform healthcare and improve overall well-being, according to new research. The authors have introduced 'patient ecosystem management,' an organizational process that focuses on treating patients differently in terms of assessing, managing and expanding resources to achieve patient health and well-being goals in hospitals, at home and at work. (2019-07-25)

Caring, accountability, and continuity: What patients and caregivers want during hospital care trans
For the first time on a large scale, researchers have investigated what patients and caregivers want from providers during a care transition. A new study from Boston Medical Center (BMC) found caring attitudes, accountability from the health system, and continuity of care were the most sought after outcomes. (2018-05-14)

Exercise reduces stress, improves cellular health in family caregivers
Exercising at least three times a week for six months reduced stress in a group of family caregivers and even appeared to lengthen a small section of their chromosomes that is believed to slow cellular aging, new UBC research has found (2018-10-03)

New AAP PROS study assesses influenza vaccine hesitancy among caregivers of children
Even caregivers whose children receive the first dose of influenza vaccine may be vaccine hesitant and have inaccurate beliefs regarding influenza vaccine and disease, according to a new American Academy of Pediatrics Pediatric Research in Office Settings study. (2019-04-27)

Symptoms of depression in caregivers may predict future health problems
Caregivers of stroke survivors who show signs of depression may have a higher risk of suffering their own health challenges down the line, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology. (2019-09-01)

Grandparents: Raising their children's children, they get the job done
Millions of children are being raised solely by their grandparents, with numbers continuing to climb as the opioid crisis and other factors disrupt families. New research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2018 National Conference & Exhibition shows that caregivers who step up to raise their grandchildren are overcoming unique challenges to manage just as well as biological and adoptive parent caregivers. (2018-11-02)

Women with Parkinson's disease less likely than men to have caregivers
Female Parkinson's disease patients are much less likely than male patients to have caregivers, despite the fact that caregivers report greater strain in caring for male patients. The findings come from a large study reported today in Neurology by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. According to the researchers, the disparity between female and male patients probably derives in part from the fact that women tend to outlive their most likely potential caregivers: their husbands. (2017-12-01)

Real cost of heart attacks and strokes: Double the direct medical expense
The full financial cost of a heart attack or stroke is twice as much as the medical costs when lost work time for patients and caregivers is included. That's the finding of research published today, World Health Day, in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology. The study concludes that victims of heart attack and stroke who return to work are 25% less productive in their first year back. (2019-04-07)

Patients lack information about imaging exams
Patients and their caregivers desire information about upcoming imaging examinations, but many are not getting it, according to a new study. The researchers found that half of all patients and caregivers end up seeking information on their own. (2018-02-13)

Scoliosis surgery in children with cerebral palsy -- quality of life benefits outweigh risks
For children with severe cerebral palsy (CP), surgery for scoliosis (sideways curvature of the spine) significantly improves the quality of life (QoL) for them and their caregivers, reports a study in the April 4, 2018, issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (2018-04-04)

Teaching happiness to dementia caregivers reduces their depression, anxiety
Caring for family members with dementia -- which is on the rise in the US -- causes significant emotional and physical stress that increases caregivers' risk of depression, anxiety and death. A new method of coping with that stress by teaching people how to focus on positive emotions reduced their anxiety and depression after six weeks, reports a new national study. It also resulted in better self-reported physical health and positive attitudes toward caregiving. (2019-05-02)

Child abuse injuries more likely to be severe if caregiver is male and unrelated to child
Efforts to prevent child abuse by people who care for children should extend to additional categories of caregivers since injuries that children suffer at the hands of their parent's male partner, babysitter or daycare worker are likely to be more severe, according to research presented during the 2017 American Academy of Pediatrics national conference. (2017-09-15)

Workers who are unpaid caregivers of older relatives struggle with unmet workplace needs
People who care for elderly parents outside of their full-time jobs -- and are unpaid for it -- experience considerable disruption of their workplace routines. Many are not getting employer support because it is not offered or because they do not feel able to use it, even if it is available, a Baylor University study found. (2019-06-25)

About half of parents use cell phones while driving with young children in the car
A new study from a team of researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing found that in the previous three months, about half of parents talked on a cell phone while driving when their children between the ages of 4 and 10 were in the car, while one in three read text messages and one in seven used social media. (2018-07-12)

Friends and family increase the risk of children becoming smokers in the UK
Teenagers whose mothers smoked during pregnancy, or whose parents or friends smoke, are more likely to smoke themselves. (2018-11-15)

Fruit and vegetable prescriptions encourage children to eat healthy
A new study shows that a fruit and vegetable prescription program implemented in Flint, Mich.,, can improve access to healthy foods for underserved children. (2018-06-12)

The CMAJ group: A home for patient-oriented research
Researchers who are conducting patient-oriented research, which engages patients in research to improve health and health care, may find a home for their research in CMAJ Open and CMAJ, announces an editorial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), (2018-05-22)

Playing a conversation game may encourage advance care planning
Few people may want to spend a Saturday night planning their end-of-life care, but playing a game designed to spur conversation about advance care planning may be a more enjoyable way to ease into the process, according to researchers. (2017-10-11)

Most children surveyed couldn't tell real guns from toy guns
Parents surveyed said they were confident their children could tell a real gun apart from a toy gun. The children themselves also said they thought they could recognize the difference. But when shown side-by-side photos of actual and fake firearms, only 41 percent of children identified both correctly. This highlights the need for campaigns to educate parents on the importance of safe firearm storage. (2018-11-02)

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