Popular Carnivores News and Current Events | Page 2

Popular Carnivores News and Current Events, Carnivores News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 2 of 10 | 363 Results
Reviled animals could be our powerful allies
Animal carnivores living in and around human habitation are declining at an unprecedented rate -- but they may provide crucial benefits to human societies. An international review led by University of Queensland researchers has revealed that predators and scavengers ranging from bats to leopards and vultures are valuable to human health and well-being. (2018-01-18)

Anthropologist contributes to major study of large animal extinction
University of Arkansas anthropology assistant professor Amelia Villaseñor contributed a large, multi-institutional study explaining how the human-influenced mass extinction of giant carnivores and herbivores of North America fundamentally changed the biodiversity and landscape of the continent. (2019-09-20)

Butterflies' diet impacts evolution of traits
A new study led by University of Minnesota researcher Emilie Snell-Rood finds that access to some nutrients may be a star player in shaping traits related to fitness such as fecundity and eye size over the long term. Given drastic increases in the availability of many nutrients due to the widespread use of fertilizers and road salts, the finding has important implications for agriculture and ecology. (2016-07-14)

Study identifies dinosaur 'missing link'
A 'Frankenstein's monster' dinosaur may be the missing link between two major dinosaur groups, plugging what was previously a big gap between them. (2017-08-15)

Letting nature take its course: Wolves in Yellowstone National Park
Since the reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone National Park in 1995, the park's ecosystem has become a deeply complex and heterogeneous system, aided by a strategy of minimal human intervention. The new study is a synthesis of 40 years of research on large mammals in Yellowstone National Park, conducted by University of Alberta ecologist Mark Boyce. (2018-10-16)

Rewilding landscapes can help to solve more than one problem
Urbanisation, biodiversity loss, climate change: just some of the worldwide problems 'rewilding' -- i.e. restoring food chains by returning 'missing' species to the landscape -- can help tackle. Researcher Liesbeth Bakker (NIOO-KNAW) has edited a theme issue of the world's oldest life sciences journal, Phil Trans B, on rewilding, together with a Danish expert. The issue is now available online. (2018-10-23)

Marsupial lion tops African lion in fight to death
Pound for pound, Australia's extinct marsupial lion (Thylacoleo carnifex) would have made mince meat of today's African lion (Panthera leo) had the two big hyper-carnivores ever squared off in a fight to the death, according to an Australian scientist. (2008-01-16)

New study models the proposed reintroduction of the Eurasian lynx to Scotland
Experts have used an innovative approach to model the proposed reintroduction of the Eurasian lynx to Scotland. (2019-03-29)

New study questions effects of reintroducing top predators
There's little evidence that reintroducing top predators to ecosystems will return them to the conditions that existed before they were wiped out, according to new research. (2019-04-03)

Details of dental wear revealed
The teeth of mammals experience constant wear. However, the details of these wear processes are largely unknown. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now demonstrated that the various areas of herbivores' teeth differ in how susceptible they are to dental wear, detailing an exact chronology. (2019-10-08)

Predators' fear of humans ripples through wildlife communities, emboldening rodents
Giving credence to the saying, 'While the cat's away, the mice will play,' a new study indicates that pumas and medium-sized carnivores lie low when they sense the presence of humans, which frees up the landscape for rodents to forage more brazenly. (2019-07-17)

Snow leopard and Himalayan wolf diets are about one-quarter livestock
Around a quarter of Himalayan snow leopard and wolf diets are livestock, the rest being wild prey, according to a study published Feb. 8, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Madhu Chetri from Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway, and colleagues. (2017-02-08)

Wild carnivores stage a comeback in Britain
Once-endangered carnivorous mammals such as otters, polecats and pine martens have staged a remarkable comeback in Britain in recent decades, a new review shows. (2019-02-25)

Study explores which carnivores are most likely to kill other carnivores
Ecologists used to think of prey as the most important factor governing the structure of predator communities. However, over the past twenty years, they have increasingly recognized the importance of interspecific killing - carnivores killing carnivores - in determining ecology and behavior. A new study by Emiliano Donadio and Steven W. Buskirk (University of Wyoming), forthcoming from The American Naturalist, explores which carnivores are most likely to participate in these interactions, and why. (2006-03-08)

Wild cat brains: An evolutionary curveball
The brains of wild cats don't necessarily respond to the same evolutionary pressures as those of their fellow mammals, humans and primates, indicates a surprising new study led by a Michigan State University neuroscientist. (2016-10-31)

Study reveals best available science for predator-livestock coexistence
A new study published in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS Biology reveals certain nonlethal methods are effective for managing predators in agricultural landscapes. Twenty-one authors from 10 nations reviewed 114 peer-reviewed scientific studies measuring the effectiveness of lethal and non-lethal methods for reducing carnivore predation on livestock. Livestock guardian dogs, livestock enclosures and fladry all were scientifically shown to be effective conflict deterrents. (2018-09-18)

Are wolves becoming domesticated again?
On landscapes around the world, environmental change is bringing people and large carnivores together -- but the union is not without its problems. (2017-04-12)

Ecologists find a 'landscape of fearlessness' in a war-torn savannah
Using a series of well-designed experiments in Mozambique's Gorongosa National Park, a Princeton-led research team confirmed each step in a trophic cascade between the elimination of predators (including leopards, African wild dogs, and hyenas) and growth of local plants. They demonstrated that the fear of predators alone can drive change in herbivore behaviors in large-mammal ecosystems. (2019-03-07)

Study measures impact of agriculture on diet of wild mammals
In an article published in PNAS, Brazilian researchers stress the need for agricultural management that favors the maintenance of wildlife. (2019-11-18)

Herbivorous mammals have bigger bellies
As an international study conducted by the University of Zurich based on 3-D reconstructions of animal skeletons reveals for the first time: Herbivorous mammals have bigger bellies than their usually slim carnivorous counterparts. In dinosaurs, however, there is no notable difference between carnivores and herbivores. (2016-11-04)

No teeth? No problem -- dinosaur species had teeth as babies, lost them as they grew
Researchers have discovered that a species of dinosaur, Limusaurus inextricabilis, lost its teeth in adolescence and did not grow another set as adults. The finding, published today in Current Biology, is a radical change in anatomy during a lifespan and may help to explain why birds have beaks but no teeth. (2016-12-22)

A fresh look at winter footprints: Environmental DNA improves tracking of rare carnivores
A new project shows that animal footprints contain enough DNA for species identification. The study, led by the USDA Forest Service, extracted DNA from snow samples collected within animal tracks and applied newly developed molecular genetic assays. The assays positively detected the DNA of each species, outperforming traditional lab techniques on previously undetectable genetic samples. This method could revolutionize winter surveys of rare species by greatly reducing or eliminating misidentifications and missed detections. (2018-11-26)

Conserving large carnivores in Alaska requires overhauling state policy
Large carnivore management in Alaska should be based on rigorous science and monitoring of the status and trends of carnivore populations, according to a Perspective article published Jan. 15 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by William Ripple of Oregon State University, and colleagues. (2019-01-15)

Guard dogs reduce killing of threatened species
Research from the University of Kent has revealed that guarding dogs can significantly reduce conflict between livestock and large carnivores, such as cheetahs or leopards, helping to reduce unwarranted killing of endangered species in South Africa. (2013-11-26)

American carnivores evolved to avoid each other, new study suggests
A large-scale analysis suggests that strategies that help America's carnivores stay away from each other have been a driving force in the evolution of many of these species, influencing such factors as whether they are active daytime or nighttime, whether they inhabit forests or grasslands, or live in trees or on the ground. (2009-03-09)

Surviving large carnivores have far-reaching impact
Anywhere large-bodied mammalian carnivore species are present, other, smaller carnivores are less likely to occur, according to an international team of researchers that conducted the first global assessment of carnivore interactions using camera trap data. (2018-08-08)

Local extinction of Southern California mountain lions possible within 50 years
Two isolated mountain lion populations in southern California's Santa Ana and Santa Monica Mountains are at risk of local extinction, perhaps as soon as within 50 years, according to a study published in the journal Ecological Applications. The extinction risk is due to low genetic diversity and mortality that affects the stability of the population. But increasing connectivity could help. (2019-03-20)

Large, violent animal packs shaped the ecosystems of the Pleistocene epoch
Intense, violent attacks by large packs of some of the world's biggest carnivores -- including extinct lions much larger than those of today, and sabertooth cats -- limited the population sizes of mammoths, mastodons and other species, and prevented widespread habitat destruction in the Pleistocene Epoch, a team of life scientists reports this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2015-10-26)

Prehistoric predators with supersized teeth had beefier arm bones
The toothiest prehistoric predators also had beefier arm bones, according to results of a study published today in the journal Paleobiology. (2012-01-04)

Polar bear headed for extinction, says University of Alberta scientist
Unless the pace of global warming is abated, polar bears could disappear within 100 years, says a University of Alberta expert in Arctic ecosystems. (2003-01-08)

Sorry, Grumpy Cat -- Study finds dogs are brainier than cats
The first study to actually count the number of cortical neurons in the brains of a number of carnivores, including cats and dogs, has found that dogs possess significantly more of them than cats. (2017-11-29)

Snowed in: Wolves stay put when it's snowing, study shows
Wolves travel shorter distances and move slower during snowfall events, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. The effects were most pronounced at night, when wolves hunt, and behaviour returned to normal within a day. (2018-12-19)

Can multiple carnivores coexist in cities?
A new citizen science study shows how urbanization may affect interactions between carnivores in small suburban forest patches, using camera trap images from Raleigh, N.C., and Washington, D.C. (2019-04-16)

For giant pandas, bamboo is vegetarian 'meat'
New research using an approach called nutritional geometry sheds light on giant panda evolution, and their unusual transition from carnivorous ancestry to extreme specialized herbivory. (2019-05-02)

Some dinosaurs could fly before they were birds
New research using the most comprehensive study of feathered dinosaurs and early birds has revised the evolutionary relationships of dinosaurs at the origin of birds. An international team of researchers, including McGill University Professor Hans Larsson published their findings in the journal Current Biology. The team pored over fossils, developed a novel analytical pipeline to search for evolutionary trees, and estimated how each species may have crossed the stringent thresholds for powered flight. (2020-08-12)

West African camera survey details human pressures on mammals in protected areas
When University of Michigan wildlife ecologist Nyeema Harris started her multiyear camera survey of West African wildlife, she sought to understand interactions between mammals and people in protected areas such as national parks. (2019-09-23)

Dishing the dirt on an early man cave
Fossil animal droppings, charcoal from ancient fires and bone fragments litter the ground of one of the world's most important human evolution sites, new research reveals. A team of Russian and Australian scientists have used modern geoarchaeological techniques to unearth new details of day-to-day life in the famous Denisova Cave complex in Siberia's Altai Mountains. (2019-09-26)

Some extinct crocs were vegetarians
Based on careful study of fossilized teeth, scientists Keegan Melstom and Randall Irmis at the Natural History Museum of Utah at the University of Utah have found that multiple ancient groups of crocodyliforms -- the group including living and extinct relatives of crocodiles and alligators -- were not the carnivores we know today. Evidence suggests that a veggie diet arose in the distant cousins of modern crocodylians at least three times. (2019-06-27)

Alien predators are more dangerous than native predators
Introduced predators such as foxes and cats are twice as deadly as native predators to Australia's unique native animals, says new research. The finding, published this week in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, is the first confirmation of what has been a long-held hypothesis among scientists. It also highlights the heavy continuing impact of these predators long after their introduction and that Australia's fauna has been among the hardest hit in the world. (2007-03-13)

Landscapes of fear, and the large carnivores they feature, important in African ecosystems
A new study focused on Mozambique's Gorongosa National Park, where entire populations of large-mammal predators were nearly extinguished during the Mozambican Civil War, illustrates how the loss of an ecosystem's top carnivores can have far-reaching consequences for prey and plant populations, turning 'landscapes of fear' into 'landscapes of fearlessness' in which emboldened herbivores graze and suppress plants. (2019-03-07)

Page 2 of 10 | 363 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.