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Popular Carnivores News and Current Events, Carnivores News Articles.
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Scientists estimate: Half of tropical forests under hunting pressure
Over half of the tropical forests is under hunting pressure. According to scientists at Radboud University, hunting causes an abundance decline of on average 27 and 40% of medium and large-size mammals in the tropics of central and south America, Africa and Asia. Even forests that are considered intact according to satellite images, could be partially defaunated. These results are published in PLOS Biology. (2019-05-14)

Alien predators are more dangerous than native predators
Introduced predators such as foxes and cats are twice as deadly as native predators to Australia's unique native animals, says new research. The finding, published this week in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, is the first confirmation of what has been a long-held hypothesis among scientists. It also highlights the heavy continuing impact of these predators long after their introduction and that Australia's fauna has been among the hardest hit in the world. (2007-03-13)

Safe uti­li­za­tion of die­ta­ry su­gars requi­res dy­na­mic cont­rol of re­dox ba­lance
Without dynamic control of redox balance animals lose their ability to survive on sugar-rich food. The regulatory system to control redox balance involves sugar-dependent gene regulation and protein phosphorylation. (2017-01-27)

Loss of large carnivores poses global conservation problem
In ecosystems around the world, the decline of large predators such as lions, dingoes, wolves, otters, and bears is changing the face of landscapes from the tropics to the Arctic -- but an analysis of 31 carnivore species published today in the journal Science shows for the first time how threats such as habitat loss, persecution by humans and loss of prey combine to create global hotspots of carnivore decline. (2014-01-09)

Giant panda's bamboo diet still looks surprisingly carnivorous
Giant pandas are unusual in being extremely specialized herbivores that feed almost exclusively on highly fibrous bamboo, despite belonging to a clade (Carnivora) of primarily flesh-eating carnivores. But a study reported in Current Biology on May 2 suggests that the switch to a restricted vegetarian diet wasn't, in some respects, as big an evolutionary leap as it seems. (2019-05-02)

Dinosaur evolution: Lumbering giants had agile ancestors
The best known sauropod dinosaurs were huge herbivorous creatures, whose brain structures were markedly different from those of their evolutionary predecessors, for the earliest representatives of the group were small, lithe carnivores. (2017-09-20)

Older Neandertal survived with a little help from his friends
An older Neandertal from about 50,000 years ago, who had suffered multiple injuries and other degenerations, became deaf and must have relied on the help of others to avoid prey and survive well into his 40s, indicates a new analysis published Oct. 20 in the online journal PLoS ONE. (2017-10-23)

Carnivores in captivity give birth at the same time of year as those in the wild
Reproductive seasonality is a fixed characteristic of a species -- University of Zurich re-searchers have now found that carnivores in captivity give birth at the same time of year as their counterparts in the wild. In some species, the gestation period is shortened in order to provide ideal conditions for the offspring, while for others it is extended. (2018-05-07)

A rare glimpse at the elusive Saharan cheetah
Research by scientists and conservationists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the Zoological Society of London, and other groups published today in PLOS ONE shows that critically endangered Saharan cheetahs exist at incredibly low densities and require vast areas for their conservation. The research also offers some of the world's only photographs of this elusive big cat. (2015-01-29)

Body size of the extinct Megalodon indeed off the charts in the shark world
A new study shows that the body size of the iconic gigantic or megatooth shark, about 15 meters (50 feet) in length, is indeed anomalously large compared to body sizes of its relatives. (2020-10-05)

Once majestic Atlantic Forest 'empty' after 500 years of over-exploitation
New research finds that 500 years of over-exploitation has halved mammal populations in South America's once majestic Atlantic Forest. A new analysis of mammal populations reveals the devastating effects of human disturbance since the area was first colonised in the 1500s. They found that apex predators and large carnivores, such as jaguars and pumas, as well as large-bodied herbivores, such as tapirs, were among the groups whose numbers had suffered the most. (2018-09-25)

The larynx has evolved more rapidly in primates
The larynx is larger, more variable in size, and has undergone faster rates of evolution in primates than in carnivores, according to a study published August 11, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Daniel Bowling of Stanford University, W. Tecumseh Fitch of the University of Vienna, and colleagues. (2020-08-13)

Magnetoreception molecule found in the eyes of dogs and primates
Dog-like carnivores and some primate species may have a magnetic compass similar to that of birds. (2016-02-25)

Previous unknown fox species found
Researchers from Wits University and the University of Johannesburg in South Africa, together with international scientists announced on Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2012, the discovery of a two million year old fossil fox at the now renowned archaeological site of Malapa in the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site. In an article published in the prestigious journal Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa, the researchers describe the previously unknown species of fox named Vulpes Skinneri. (2013-01-23)

Half-a-billion-year-old fossil reveals the origins of comb jellies
One of the ocean's little known carnivores has been allocated a new place in the evolutionary tree of life after scientists discovered its unmistakable resemblance with other sea-floor dwelling creatures. (2019-03-21)

What a group of bizarre-looking bats can tell us about the evolution of mammals
Bats with skulls and teeth adapted to a wide range of diets are helping scientists understand how major groups of mammals first evolved. (2019-08-14)

South African wildlife management/conservation models do not protect carnivores equally
In results released this week, an international team of wildlife ecologists reports that the trend toward more reliance on private game farms and reserves to manage and conserve free-ranging carnivores in South Africa is more complicated than it appears - ''a mosaic'' of unequal protection across different land management types. The private areas do not play the same role, and may not be a conservation panacea. (2020-08-27)

Well-preserved skeleton reveals the ecology and evolution of early carnivorous mammals
Prior to the rise of modern day mammalian carnivores, North America was dominated by a now extinct group of mammalian carnivores, hyaenodontids. Fossils of hyaenodontids are relatively common from the early Eocene, but most are specimens of teeth. A new find of a nearly complete skeleton has allowed for a more detailed study of the ecology and evolutionary relationships of these early carnivores. (2015-12-09)

Hyenas cooperate, problem-solve better than primates
Spotted hyenas may not be smarter than chimpanzees, but a new study shows that they outperform the primates on cooperative problem-solving tests. (2009-09-28)

Saber-toothed cats and bear dogs: How they made cohabitation work
The fossilized fangs of saber-toothed cats hold clues to how the extinct mammals shared space and food with other large predators 9 million years ago. (2012-11-06)

Research dog helps scientists save endangered carnivores
Scat-sniffing research dogs are helping scientists map out a plan to save reclusive jaguars, pumas, bush dogs and other endangered carnivores in the increasingly fragmented forests of northeastern Argentina, according to a new study from Washington University in St. Louis. (2017-09-05)

Carnivores living near people feast on human food, threatening ecosystems
MADISON - Ecologists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have found that carnivores living near people can get more than half of their diets from human food sources, a major lifestyle disruption that could put North America's carnivore-dominated ecosystems at risk. (2020-10-12)

Extinct sabertooth cats were social, found strength in numbers, study shows
The sabertooth cat, one of the most iconic extinct mammal species, was likely to be a social animal, living and hunting like lions today, according to new scientific research. The species is famous for its extremely long canine teeth, which reached up to seven inches in length and extended below the lower jaw of the cat. (2008-10-30)

Preventing mass extinctions of big mammals will require immediate action
Preventing the extinctions of the world's largest mammals -- including gorillas, rhinoceroses, elephants, lions, tigers, wolves and bears -- will require prompt, bold political action and financial commitments from nations worldwide, argue 43 wildlife experts from six continents. (2016-08-05)

Prehistoric puma poo reveals oldest parasite DNA ever recorded
The oldest parasite DNA ever recorded has been found in the ancient, desiccated feces of a puma. (2019-08-27)

Scientists explain the origin of brain mapping diversity for eye dominance
In a recent study that will be published in the Journal of Neuroscience on November 14th, researchers found evidence that ocular dominance patterns are diverse because the amount of cortex available to represent each binocular point varies greatly across species and individual animals of the same species. (2019-11-11)

Megalodons gave birth to large newborns that likely grew by eating unhatched eggs in womb
A new study shows that the gigantic Megalodon or megatooth shark, which lived nearly worldwide roughly 15-3.6 million years ago and reached at least 50 feet (15 meters) in length, gave birth to babies larger than most adult humans. (2021-01-10)

Study to focus on diet, nutrition and weight loss in cats with cancer
A cat with cancer is losing weight. What's an owner - or even a veterinarian - to do? A study beginning in April at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine seeks to answer that question. Researchers hope they can establish, for the first time, why cats with cancer lose weight during treatment. (2001-04-02)

30 years after Chernobyl, UGA camera study reveals wildlife abundance in CEZ
While humans are now scarce in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, continued studies--including a just-published camera study conducted by researchers from the University of Georgia's Savannah River Ecology Laboratory--validate findings that wildlife populations are abundant at the site. The camera study, published in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment and led by UGA's James Beasley, is the first remote-camera scent-station survey conducted within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, or CEZ. (2016-04-18)

Hitching a ride with a predator
A new study by researchers at the University of Alberta's Department of Biological Sciences is the first to comprehensively examine existing literature to identify broader patterns and suggest ways in which the phenomenon is important for plant populations and seed evolution. Anni Hämäläinen, lead investigator and postdoctoral fellow, explains that predator-assisted seed dispersal is important to colonize and recolonize plant life in the wild. (2017-02-23)

African predator rediscovered in Tanzania
A scientist from the Bronx Zoo-based Wildlife Conservation Society has rediscovered an African carnivore that has remained undetected for the last 70 years. (2002-06-19)

Hot dogs: Is climate change impacting populations of African wild dogs?
Climate change may be harming the future of African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) by impacting the survival rates of pups, according to one of the first studies on how shifting temperatures are impacting tropical species. Led by scientists from ZSL (Zoological Society of London) and published in the Journal of Animal Ecology, the study highlights how African wild dogs -- already classified as Endangered by the IUCN Red List -- raise fewer pups at high temperatures. (2017-07-19)

Dental microwear provides clues to dietary habits of lepidosauria
High-resolution microscopic images of the surface of dental enamel of lepidosauria, which is a subclass of reptiles including monitor lizards, iguanas, lizards, and tuatara, allow scientists to determine their dietary habits. The enamel wear patterns reveal significant differences between carnivores and herbivores, but also allow finer distinctions, such as between algae-, fruit-, and mollusk-eating species. These findings are the result of research by a team led by scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz. (2019-06-21)

Researchers find new giant amphibian fossils in Africa
Two new 250 million year-old species of large, meat-eating amphibians have been discovered by researchers, including investigators from McGill University. (2005-04-14)

Neandertals' main food source was definitely meat
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany describe two late Neandertals with exceptionally high nitrogen isotope ratios, which would traditionally be interpreted as the signature of freshwater fish consumption. By studying the isotope ratios of single amino acids, they however demonstrated that instead of fish, the adult Neandertal had a diet relying on large herbivore mammals and that the other Neandertal was a breastfeeding baby whose mother was also a carnivore. (2019-02-18)

New research reports discovery of 5-million-year-old honey badger-like animal
Five million years ago, dangerous carnivores - such as giant wolverines and otters, bears, sabertooth cats, and large hyaenids - prowled the West Coast of South Africa. Today we can confirm that, among them, fearlessly roamed a smaller relative of the living honey badger. (2020-11-02)

Divergences between scientific and Indigenous and Local Knowledge can be helpful
Divergences between scientific and Indigenous and Local Knowledge can provide a better understanding of why local pastoralists may be willing, or not, to participate in conservation initiatives for carnivores, a study from University of Helsinki suggests. (2021-01-15)

The better to eat you with? How dinosaurs' jaws influenced diet
Just how bad was T. rex's bite? New research from the University of Bristol has found that the feeding style and dietary preferences of dinosaurs was closely linked to how wide they could open their jaws. (2015-11-03)

In Iran, cheetahs collared for the first time
An international team of scientists led by the Wildlife Conservation Society working in Iran has successfully fitted two Asiatic cheetahs with Global Positioning System (GPS) collars, marking the first time this highly endangered population of big cats can be tracked by conservationists. (2007-03-01)

Inadequate policies for hunting large carnivores
Many policies regulating carnivore hunting do not adequately acknowledge and address the negative effects of hunting on demography and population dynamics, authors of this Policy Forum say. (2015-12-17)

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