Popular Cell Culture News and Current Events

Popular Cell Culture News and Current Events, Cell Culture News Articles.
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Novel microplate 3D bioprinting platform for muscle & tendon tissue engineering
New research describes the development of a novel screening platform with automated production of 3D muscle- and tendon-like tissues using 3D bioprinting. (2018-06-13)

Researchers identify chemical compound that inhibits Ebola virus replication
An organic chemical compound shows effective antiviral activity against Ebola virus and several other viruses, according to a study led by Georgia State University. (2018-03-28)

Microglia turned on
Part of the immune system in the brain is made up of so-called microglia cells. Korean and Singaporean researchers have now developed a fluorescent probe that specifically labels this type of macrophage. The cells were visualized in cell culture and in the live brains of rodents. As detailed in the journal Angewandte Chemie, a gene product expressed in microglia triggers the probe into a fluorescing state, which is detected through live-cell fluorescence imaging. (2019-05-27)

Music really is a universal language
Songs serve many different purposes: accompanying a dance, soothing an infant, or expressing love. Now, after analyzing recordings from all around the world, researchers reporting in Current Biology show that vocal songs sharing one of those many functions tend to sound similar to one another, no matter which culture they come from. As a result, people listening to those songs could make accurate inferences about them, even after hearing only a quick 14-second sampling. (2018-01-25)

Can discrimination contribute to feelings of radicalization?
Muslim immigrants who feel marginalized and discriminated against in countries that expect them to integrate into their culture and society are more likely to experience psychological threats to their own significance that could be related to increased support of radicalism, according to new research presented at the American Psychological Association's 125th Annual Convention. (2017-08-05)

Purest yet liver-like cells generated from induced pluripotent stem cells
A team of researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina and elsewhere has found a better way to purify liver cells made from induced pluripotent stem cells. This new methodology could facilitate progress toward an important clinical goal: the treatment of patients with disease-causing mutations in their livers by transplant of unmutated liver cells derived from their own stem cells. (2016-08-29)

HIV spreads through direct cell-to-cell contact
The spread of pathogens like the HI virus is often studied in a test tube, i.e. in two-dimensional cell cultures, even though it hardly reflects the much more complex conditions in the human body. Using novel cell culture systems, quantitative image analysis, and computer simulations, an interdisciplinary team of scientists from Heidelberg University has now explored how HIV spreads in three-dimensional tissue-like environments. (2019-07-25)

Love actually: Americans agree on what makes people 'feel the love'
Americans may disagree on many things, but love might not be one of them. According to researchers, people in the US largely agree about what makes them feel loved, coming to a general consensus that it may be small gestures that matter most. (2017-11-06)

A simple method developed for 3-D bio-fabrication based on bacterial cellulose
Bacterial cellulose can be used in food, cosmetics and biomedical applications, such as implants and artificial organs. (2018-03-26)

Novel device and staff education lead to lower blood culture contamination rates
A Medical University of South Carolina study found that use of a mechanical initial specimen diversion device (ISDD®) and staff education led to a nearly four-fold decrease in contaminated blood cultures that was sustained over 20 months. (2018-01-24)

Study: Student attitudes toward cheating may spill over into their careers
A study co-authored by an SF State marketing professor finds that students who tolerate cheating in the classroom may also turn a blind eye to unethical behavior in the workplace. (2019-11-27)

Penn team shows how seemingly acute viral infections can persist
Led by Carolina López of the University of Pennsylvania, a multi-disciplinary research team has resolved a paradox of viral infection. They've identified how a viral product can both trigger an immune response aimed at eliminating the virus or, conversely, allow the virus to survive and persist. (2017-10-06)

DNA 'tattoos' link adult, daughter stem cells in planarians
Using the molecular equivalent of a tattoo on DNA that adult stem cells pass to their (2008-09-10)

Scientists culture human placenta stem cells for first time
Scientists have derived and grown trophoblast stem cells for the first time, which will lead to better understanding of the human placenta. (2018-01-24)

Emotionally demanding workload and confrontational patients key stressors for GPs
The emotional impact of their daily workload and confrontational patients are among the key stressors for family doctors in England, reveals an analysis of feedback from general practitioners, published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2018-01-11)

Extracellular vesicles could be personalized drug delivery vehicles
Creating enough nanovesicles to inexpensively serve as a drug delivery system may be as simple as putting the cells through a sieve, according to an international team of researchers who used mouse autologous -- their own -- immune cells to create large amounts of fillable nanovesicles to deliver drugs to tumors in mice. (2018-03-12)

First discover the disorder and then find the patients
Biochemists of Bielefeld University have confirmed the cause of initially unclear symptoms of patients in Israel. Their studies reveal that the patients suffer from a disorder called 'MPS III-E'. It was discovered by the Bielefeld researchers in 2012. However, until now there were no known patients. (2018-01-05)

Skin cancers linked with reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease
Previous studies have demonstrated a decreased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in individuals with various cancers, including non-melanoma skin cancers (including squamous cell cancers and basal cell cancers). (2018-04-19)

Ancient human population histories revealed in Central and South America
The first high quality ancient DNA data from Central and South America -- 49 individuals some as old as 11,000 years -- has revealed a major and previously unknown exchanges between populations. For the first time, researchers have archaeological and genetic evidence linking some of the oldest humans in Central America to the earliest known populations to arrive in the New World. (2018-11-09)

Lab-grown eggs could pave way towards new fertility treatments
Human eggs have been developed in the lab from their earliest stage to full maturity, in a study that could lead to improved fertility treatments. (2018-02-08)

Solar cell design with over 50 percent energy-conversion efficiency
Solar cells convert the sun's energy into electricity by converting photons into electrons. A new solar cell design could raise the energy conversion efficiency to over 50 percent by absorbing the spectral components of longer wavelengths that are usually lost during transmission through the cell. These findings were published on April 6 in the online edition of Nature Communications. (2017-04-23)

Heart-muscle patches made with human cells improve heart attack recovery
Large, human cardiac-muscle patches created in the lab have been tested, for the first time, on large animals in a heart attack model. This clinically relevant approach showed that the patches significantly improved recovery from heart attack injury. The results are a step closer to the goal of treating human heart attacks by suturing cardiac-muscle patches over an area of dead heart muscle in order to reduce the pathology that often leads to heart failure. (2018-01-10)

PSU study: Pro-diversity policies make companies more innovative and profitable
PSU business school professor's research shows that companies that hire a more diverse set of employees are rewarded with a richer pipeline of innovative products and a stronger financial position. (2018-02-23)

Growing a cerebral tract in a microscale brain model
An international research team led by The University of Tokyo modeled the growth of cerebral tracts. Using neurons derived from stem cells, they grew cortical-like spheroids. In a microdevice, the spheroids extended bundles of axons toward each other, forming a physical and electrical connection. Fascicles grew less efficiently when one spheroid was absent, and when a gene relevant to cerebral tract formation was knocked-down. The study further illuminates brain growth and developmental disorders. (2019-04-18)

Stem cells found in adult skin can be transplanted and function in mouse models of disease
Researchers at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) and the University of Calgary have found that stem cells derived from adult skin can create neural cell types that can be transplanted into and function in mouse models of disease. This research is reported in the June 14, 2006 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. (2006-06-14)

Cell cycle proteins help immune cells trap microbes with nets made of DNA
In your bloodstream, there are immune cells called neutrophils that, when faced with a pathogenic threat, will expel their DNA like a net to contain it. These DNA snares are called neutrophil extracellular traps or NETs. Researchers from Germany and the United States describe an important step in how these NETs are released and how they stop a fungus from establishing an infection in mice and human cells in the journal Developmental Cell. (2017-11-20)

A new therapeutic target to fight metastasis in ovarian cancer
Researchers of IDIBELL - ICO have described a key cellular receptor in the processes of metastasis in ovarian cancer. The finding might lead to the use of inhibitors of this receptor as a therapeutic target in the most aggressive variants of the disease. (2018-01-04)

Efforts to revive coal industry unlikely to work, may slow job growth
Current federal efforts to revive the coal industry will likely do more harm than good to fragile Appalachian communities transitioning from coal as a major source of employment, according to a study conducted by Indiana University researchers. (2017-10-27)

3-D-written model to provide better understanding of cancer spread
Purdue researcher Luis Solorio has helped create a lifelike cancer environment out of polymer to better predict how drugs might stop its course. (2018-03-02)

Cell biology: Positioning the cleavage furrow
Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have identified a signaling pathway that restricts cleavage furrow formation to the mid-plane of the cell. (2018-01-11)

Portland State study points to connection between religion and risk
Research co-authored by Portland State University finance professor Jing Zhao found that the religious beliefs of the population in counties where hedge funds are headquartered influence the riskiness of hedge fund managers' portfolios. (2018-02-06)

Bristol researchers use gene editing to improve red blood cell transfusion compatibility
Synthetic biologists at the University of Bristol have succeeded in generating laboratory-made red blood cells with rare blood group types that could one day be used to help patients who cannot be matched with donor blood. (2018-04-27)

Drug combo gangs up to take on triple-negative breast cancer
In the hunt for novel treatments against an aggressive form of breast cancer, researchers combined a new protein inhibitor with a chemotherapy drug to create a powerful combination that resulted in cancer cell death. (2017-09-26)

3-D tissue model of developing heart could help drug safety testing for pregnant women
A Syracuse University engineering team has developed a process that combines biomaterials-based cell patterning and stem cell technology to make a 3-D tissue model that could mimic early stage human heart development. Embryotoxicity is just one potential use of the modeling platform. (2018-03-16)

Compounds restore antibiotics' efficacy against MRSA
Antibiotics rendered useless by the notorious methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, (MRSA) may get a second life, thanks to compounds that can restore the bug's susceptibility to antibiotics, according to a new study in mice. (2016-03-09)

Enabling technology in cell-based therapies: Scale-up, scale-out or program in-place
Technologies that are reducing costs and changing the ways in which researchers and clinicians process and use therapeutic cells are showcased in the August 2018 special issue of SLAS Technology. (2018-07-23)

Tumor-dwelling immune cells thwart cancer immunotherapy
Researchers have caught tumor-associated immune cells called macrophages in the act of stealing checkpoint inhibitor antibodies away from their intended T cell targets, and blocking this thievery led to improved therapeutic responses in tumor-bearing mice. (2017-05-10)

Measuring stress around cells
Tissues and organs in the human body are shaped through forces generated by cells, that push and pull, to ''sculpt'' biological structures. Thanks to a new tool developed at McGill University, scientists will now be able to watch, and map these forces. (2019-01-30)

Anti-tumor effect of novel plasma medicine caused by lactate
Nagoya University researchers developed a new physical plasma-activated salt solution for use as chemotherapy. Lactate was identified as the key anti-tumor component. The solution killed brain tumor cells in vitro and reduced the tumor volume in mice, revealing the potential of plasma-activated liquids in clinical applications. (2016-12-13)

From black hat to white hat: Findings tip assumptions about TAK1 in muscle growth
Convention was that the signaling protein, transforming growth factor-ß-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is detrimental to muscle health since it activates pathways associated with muscle wasting. However deactivating TAK1 did not preserve muscle health as expected, but resulted in the opposite effect: muscle wasting. (2018-02-08)

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