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Popular Cell Culture News and Current Events, Cell Culture News Articles.
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Hairy skin grown from mouse stem cells
Indiana University School of Medicine researchers have cultured the first lab-grown skin tissue complete with hair follicles. This skin model, developed using stem cells from mice, more closely resembles natural hair than existing models and may prove useful for testing drugs, understanding hair growth, and reducing the practice of animal testing. The work appears January 2 in the journal Cell Reports. (2018-01-02)

Cell culture system could offer cancer breakthrough
A new cell culture system that provides a tool for preclinical cancer drug development and screening has been developed by researchers in the USA. The team, led by scientists from Princeton University, N.J., created a microfluidic cell culture device that allows the direct, real-time observation of the development of drug resistance in cancer cells. (2017-08-29)

Indonesian island found to be unusually rich in cave paintings
A tiny Indonesian island, previously unexplored by archaeologists, has been found to be unusually rich in ancient cave paintings following a study by researchers from The Australian National University (ANU). (2017-12-15)

Improving the neuron factory -- new modulator of stem cell identity found
Since their discovery in 2006, induced pluripotent stem cells are a glimmer of hope for many diseases. But further research of the complex regulation of pluripotent stem cell identity revealed unexpected difficulties. A team of researchers at the Cluster of Excellence CECAD has now found an efficient way to produce neurons from pluripotent stem cells. Their research was published in Nature Communications. (2017-11-13)

Watch fat cells help heal a wound in a fly
Fat body cells in Drosophila play a surprising role in sealing wounds and preventing infection, researchers at the University of Bristol report February 26 in the journal Developmental Cell. The cells, which were previously thought to be immobile, propel themselves forward toward wounds with a wormlike wave motion, rather than adhering to and pushing off of other structures like most motile cells do. (2018-02-26)

Hospital ownership of practice may reduce physician burnout
Among staff in small- to medium-sized primary care practices, hospital ownership is associated with positive perceptions of work environment and lower burnout. (2018-04-09)

Domestic goat dating back to the Neolithic Corded Ware period identified in Finland
Goat hairs have been found in a grave structure that was discovered in the 1930s in Kauhava, western Finland. These are the oldest animal hairs found in Finland. From the perspective of Finnish prehistory, the finding supports the evidence of animal husbandry practised during the Corded Ware period, while also revealing details of burial rituals. (2018-02-23)

How tumor necrosis factor protects against infection
Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a messenger substance in the immune system, plays an important role in triggering chronic inflammatory diseases. For this reason, TNF inhibitors are a standard form of treatment for patients with rheumatoid arthritis and certain inflammatory bowel diseases. However, TNF also protects against infection, which means that inhibiting it can cause latent infections to resurface. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have now discovered a new mechanism via which TNF protects against intracellular pathogens that cause infection. (2016-07-11)

Dietary restriction and life span in male and hermaphrodite worms
An organism's lifespan is known to be affected by its sex and diet, but where these two factors overlap biologically is not well understood. Researchers in Japan looked for clues in worms that have two sexes: hermaphrodite or male. They found that hermaphrodite worms can live over two weeks longer when put on various forms of dietary restriction, whereas male worms show no change in lifespan.The work appears December 26 in Cell Reports. (2017-12-26)

Researchers create novel compound targeting melanoma cells
An international team of researchers has developed a novel compound that successfully inhibits growth of melanoma cells by targeting specific epigenetic modifying proteins in these cells. (2018-01-04)

Ethical issues are important in 'standard-of-care' clinical trials
A learning healthcare system (LHS) aligns science, informatics, incentives, and culture for continuous improvement and innovation, with a delivery process that is based on best practices while also capturing new knowledge. Integral to LHSs are clinical trials that compare interventions that are already commonly in use (as 'accepted' or 'standard-of-care'). (2018-01-10)

Cell aging in lung epithelial cells
Pulmonary fibrosis can possibly be attributed to a kind of cellular aging process, which is called senescence. This has been shown by researchers from the Helmholtz Zentrum München, partner in the German Center for Lung Research. As they report in the European Respiratory Journal, they have already successfully counteracted this mechanism in the cell culture with the help of drugs. (2017-08-04)

Advances in 3D and organoid cell culture
A new collection of reviews and original research articles illustrate how new technologies and advanced cell culture are accelerating basic research, drug discovery and drug development. (2019-01-23)

Smart molecules trigger white blood cells to become better cancer-eating machines
A team of researchers has engineered smart protein molecules that can reprogram white blood cells to ignore a self-defense signaling mechanism that cancer cells use to survive and spread in the body. Researchers say the advance could lead to a new method of re-engineering immune cells to fight cancer and infectious diseases. The team successfully tested this method in a live cell culture system. (2017-09-28)

Ancient textiles reveal differences in Mediterranean fabrics in the 1st millennium BC
Analysis of Iron Age textiles indicates that during c. 1000-400 BC Italy shared the textile culture of Central Europe, while Greece was largely influenced by the traditions of ancient Near East. (2017-09-22)

Blood donors' leftover immune cells reveal secrets of antibody affinity
Researchers at Iowa State University, partnering with the LifeServe Blood Center, have gained crucial insights into how natural killer cells circulating in the human body differ from those typically studied in the lab. The results of this research are published in the March 9 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry. (2018-03-09)

Your cell phone could curb the intensity of your workout
Talking or texting on a cell phone during exercise will lower the intensity of a workout and also affect balance. (2017-01-13)

Cells lacking nuclei struggle to move in 3-D environments
A study led by UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers and published in the Journal of Cell Biology examined the role of the physical structure of the nucleus in cell movement through different surfaces. (2018-01-19)

ANU research reveals genetic timeline of early Pacific settlers
Researchers from The Australian National University have helped put together the most comprehensive study ever conducted into the origins of people in Vanuatu -- regarded as a geographic gateway from Asia to the Remote Pacific. (2018-03-09)

University of Minnesota research derives muscle stem cells from teratomas
Researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School have developed a process to regenerate skeletal muscle cells in mice with muscular dystrophy. (2018-07-05)

Food packaging could be negatively affecting nutrient absorption in your body
Food packaging could be negatively affecting the way in which your digestive tract operates, according to new research by faculty and students at Binghamton University, State University at New York. (2018-04-09)

Maasai farmers only kill lions when they attack livestock
Maasai farmers do not kill lions for retribution whenever they lose sheep or cattle, new research shows. (2019-02-26)

New mouse model makes stem cells light up green
Multipotent stromal cells have long been a hot topic in medical research. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now found a way to specifically mark these stem cells. This makes it possible to analyze their distribution pattern and their function in living organisms. The study, which included researchers from Oxford University, Tsukuba University and the Karolinska Institute Stockholm, is now being published in the journal (2018-02-01)

Skilled female potters travelled around the Baltic nearly 5000 years ago
During the Corded Ware Culture period, Finland, Estonia and Sweden received skilful female artisans, who had learned to create fashionable and innovative pottery in the eastern region of the Gulf of Finland. The Baltic Sea countries also had a close network for trade in pottery. (2018-03-22)

Scientists design new skin cell culture technique to study human papillomavirus
A new cell culture strategy promises to illuminate the mysterious early stages of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, according to research published in PLOS Pathogens by Malgorzata Bienkowska-Haba and colleagues at Louisiana State University. (2018-03-01)

New method enables more extensive preclinical testing of heart drugs and therapies
A new biomimetic culture system mimics the environment of a living organ through continuous electrical stimulation and oxygenation, maintaining viability and functionality of heart slices for six days. Previous culture systems maintained functional heart slices for no more than 24 hours. The extended viability time will enable improved preclinical testing of drugs and gene therapies for effectiveness and toxicity. (2019-07-25)

A twist of fate -- Reprogrammed fibroblasts resemble embryonic stem cells
Stem cell biology takes another exciting leap forward as scientists report that normal tissue cells can be reprogrammed to exhibit many of the properties that are characteristic of embryonic stem cells, including the ability to give rise to multiple cell types and contribute to the germline. (2007-06-06)

Intoxicatingly light-sensitive
ETH chemists have synthesised several variants of THC, the active ingredient in cannabis. Its structure can be altered with light, and the researchers have used this to create a new tool that can be used to more effectively study the body's own cannabinoid system. (2018-01-10)

UC researcher looks at Trump's waterboarding boasts -- do they matte
University of Cincinnati political science research asks how President Trump's 'hell of a lot worse than waterboarding' rhetoric could shift legal norms. (2017-09-01)

Copper Age Iberians 'exported' their culture -- but not their genes -- all over Europe
Prehistoric Iberians 'exported' their culture throughout Europe, reaching Great Britain, Sicily, Poland and all over central Europe in general. However, they did not export their genes. The Beaker culture, which probably originated in Iberia, left remains in those parts of the continent. However, that diffusion was not due to large migrations of populations that took this culture with them. (2018-02-21)

Cellular stress increases the probability of developing autoimmune diseases
Researchers found that cellular stress enhances the activation of certain type of immune cells with implications in many chronic inflammatory conditions. (2017-06-13)

Engineers grow functioning human muscle from skin cells
Duke engineers have grown the first functioning human muscle from non-muscle cells -- skin cells reverted to their primordial stem cell state. The ability to start from cellular scratch using non-muscle tissue will allow scientists to grow far more muscle cells, provide an easier path to genome editing and cellular therapies, and develop individually tailored models of rare muscle diseases for drug discovery and basic biology studies. (2018-01-09)

Penn study on super-silenced DNA hints at new ways to reprogram cells
Newly described stretches of super-silenced DNA reveal a fresh approach to reprogram cell identity to use in regenerative medicine studies and one day in the clinic. (2018-01-05)

The future of cell culture: A new continuous bioprocess developed
Scientists at Newcastle University, UK have developed a revolutionary technique to allow the continuous production and collection of cells. (2017-11-17)

Live cell imaging using a smartphone
A recent study from Uppsala University shows how smartphones can be used to make movies of living cells, without the need for expensive equipment. The study is published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, making it possible for laboratories around the world to do the same thing. (2016-12-21)

Animals talk, sing and act like humans?
For decades, the consensus was that as young children begin reasoning about the biological world, they adopt an (2010-05-10)

Scientists create functioning kidney tissue
Scientists have successfully produced human kidney tissue within a living organism which is able to produce urine, a first for medical science. The study led by Professors Sue Kimber and Adrian Woolf from The University of Manchester, signifies a significant milestone in the development of treatment for kidney disease. (2018-02-09)

Testing cells for cancer drug resistance
Biophysicists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have demonstrated that Raman microscopy can be used to detect the resistance of tumour cells to cancer drugs. Unlike conventional approaches, this method does not require any antibodies or markers. It detects the response of cells to administered drugs and therefore could determine the effect of drugs in preclinical studies. (2018-10-26)

Leaders in Healthcare
Join aspiring leaders to address some of the biggest issues facing healthcare leadership and management in the UK, affecting the professional workforce as well as the population. (2016-10-19)

What happens to language as populations grow? It simplifies, say researchers
Languages have an intriguing paradox. Languages with lots of speakers, such as English and Mandarin, have large vocabularies with relatively simple grammar. Yet the opposite is also true: Languages with fewer speakers have fewer words but complex grammars. (2018-01-29)

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