Popular Cell Division News and Current Events

Popular Cell Division News and Current Events, Cell Division News Articles.
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FASEB Science Research Conference: Protein Kinases and Protein Phosphorylation
This conference focuses on the biology of protein kinases and phosphorylation signaling. Among FASEB's longest-running SRCs, it brings together a dynamic international community of junior investigators, trainees, and established researchers from a field that is achieving startling new insight and medical breakthroughs. (2017-02-28)

Epigenetic editing reveals surprising insights into early breast cancer development
Changing the epigenetic code of a single gene is enough to cause a healthy breast cell to begin a chain reaction and become abnormal, according to research by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). (2017-11-13)

Unveiling the mechanism protecting replicated DNA from degradation
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University and the FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology (IFOM) in Italy have succeeded in depleting AND-1, a key protein for DNA replication, by using a recently developed conditional protein degradation system. Consequently, they were able to gain unprecedented access to the mechanism behind how AND-1 works during DNA replication and cell proliferation in vertebrate cells, demonstrating that AND-1 has two different functions during DNA replication mediated by different domains of AND-1. (2018-09-29)

Flipping lipids for cell transport-tubules
An enzyme that flips lipids from the outer to the inner layer of the cell membrane launches the process that permits cells to engulf external substances. (2018-03-29)

Growing and surviving: How proteins regulate the cell cycle
Cell division is the basis of all life. Even the smallest errors in this complex process can lead to grave diseases like cancer. Certain proteins have to be switched on or off at certain times for everything to go according to plan. Biophysicists and medical biochemists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have managed to describe the underlying mechanism of this process. (2018-03-23)

HKBU Chinese medicine scholars develop HKBU Chinese medicine scholars develop
Chinese Medicine scholars at Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have succeeded in developing a novel targeted delivery system for CRISPR/Cas9 to achieve therapeutic genome editing of VEGFA in osteosarcoma (OS). (2017-11-10)

Academic study finds women wearing heavy makeup less likely to be perceived as leaders
Women wearing heavy makeup are less likely to be thought of as good leaders, new research from Abertay University has found. (2018-03-09)

Plant cells survive but stop dividing upon DNA damage
The cell cycle is how a cell passes its DNA but ceases if the DNA is damaged, as otherwise it risks passing this damage to daughter cells. Scientists at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report a new molecular mechanism that explains how this cessation occurs. The study shows that the transcription factor family MYB3R is normally degraded, but accumulates upon DNA damage to prevent cell cycle progression. (2017-10-06)

Advanced therapy offers cure for relapsed cancer patient
Testicular cancer patients who do not respond to traditional therapy can be cured with high-dose chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant, according to an Indiana University School of Medicine study by Lawrence Einhorn, M.D.; Stephen Williams, M.D.; Rafat Abonour, M.D., and colleagues published in the July 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Although the number of relapsed testicular cancer patients in the US is small, the IU Simon Cancer Center treats a majority of them. (2007-07-25)

Skin cancers linked with reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease
Previous studies have demonstrated a decreased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in individuals with various cancers, including non-melanoma skin cancers (including squamous cell cancers and basal cell cancers). (2018-04-19)

Understanding your bacteria
New insight into bacterial cell division could lead to advancements in the fight against harmful bacteria. (2016-05-25)

New insights into leading cause of miscarriage, birth defects discovered
Ten to 25 percent of human embryos contain the wrong number of chromosomes, resulting in miscarriage or birth defects such as Down syndrome. The incidence of these errors rises dramatically as women age. Two recent Northwestern University studies shed new light on the mystery of the leading cause of birth defects and miscarriage, laying the foundation for further research in an understudied but crucially important field of genetic study. (2017-10-02)

Molecular target UNC45A is essential for cancer but not normal cell proliferation
Identifying a protein that plays a key role in cancer cell growth is a first step toward the development of a targeted cancer therapy. It is especially promising when this protein is dispensable for the growth of normal cells. Their discovery that UNC45A fits these criteria has researchers, led by Dr. Ahmed Chadli, of the Georgia Cancer Center at Augusta University, excited about potential new cancer therapeutic strategies involving the inhibition of UNC45A. (2019-04-19)

Cell cycle proteins help immune cells trap microbes with nets made of DNA
In your bloodstream, there are immune cells called neutrophils that, when faced with a pathogenic threat, will expel their DNA like a net to contain it. These DNA snares are called neutrophil extracellular traps or NETs. Researchers from Germany and the United States describe an important step in how these NETs are released and how they stop a fungus from establishing an infection in mice and human cells in the journal Developmental Cell. (2017-11-20)

Solar cell design with over 50 percent energy-conversion efficiency
Solar cells convert the sun's energy into electricity by converting photons into electrons. A new solar cell design could raise the energy conversion efficiency to over 50 percent by absorbing the spectral components of longer wavelengths that are usually lost during transmission through the cell. These findings were published on April 6 in the online edition of Nature Communications. (2017-04-23)

Researchers shed light on why exercise slows progression of Parkinson's disease
While vigorous exercise on a treadmill has been shown to slow the progression of Parkinson's disease in patients, the molecular reasons behind it have remained a mystery. (2017-12-22)

Reversing aging now possible!
DGIST's research team identified the mechanism of reversible recovery of aging cells by inducing lysosomal activation. The team opened a new horizon of aging recovery research by changing the irreversibility paradigm of aging. (2017-04-03)

New stem-cell findings can help the body to cure itself
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have identified an important mechanism that regulates how many new cells are produced by each intestinal stem cell. The study is published in the latest issue of the prestigious scientific journal, Cell. (2006-06-16)

Cell biology: Positioning the cleavage furrow
Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have identified a signaling pathway that restricts cleavage furrow formation to the mid-plane of the cell. (2018-01-11)

New approach to studying chromosomes' centers may reveal link to Down syndrome and more
A new technique may force the centromere -- the mysterious stretch of DNA in the center of every chromosome -- to give up its secrets at last. The first test of the approach has yielded clues about the role of centromeres in Down syndrome, and further use may accelerate research on other conditions that may have roots in centromere-related problems. (2017-11-20)

Liver study offers insights into hard-to-treat diseases
A key cell process that could cause damage to bile ducts and help explain some liver diseases has been identified by scientists. (2018-03-09)

Inhibiting metabolism found to be effective in treating aggressive form of lung cancer
Researchers from UCLA and Long Beach Memorial Medical Center have found that two targeted therapies could be more effective if used in combination to treat squamous cell carcinomas of the lung (2018-04-12)

Biologists unravel another mystery of what makes DNA go 'loopy'
The journal Science published the research by biologists at Emory University, showing that a process known as hemimethylation plays a role in looping DNA in a specific way. The researchers also demonstrated that hemimethylation is maintained deliberately -- not through random mistakes as previously thought -- and is passed down through human cell generations. (2018-03-15)

Solving the puzzle of multicellularity
Wits PhD student, Jonathan Featherston, of the Evolution of Complexity Laboratory at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, has answered at least part of this question, by decoding the genomic sequence of one of the simplest of all multicellular organisms -- the four-celled alga Tetrabaena socialis. (2018-02-02)

Global research team fills language gap in plant science
To keep pace with the fast-evolving study of cellular plant science, an international team of researchers has created terminology and definitions likely to become everyday language in laboratories and university classrooms worldwide. (2017-10-03)

Immune cell target that may prevent or delay heart failure after pressure overload
Researchers have identified a therapeutic target to prevent or delay heart failure from pressure overload of the heart, and a potential biomarker for the same. They say their animal studies carry clinical and translational potential. Mouse-model experiments showed that preventing the early infiltration of CCR2+ macrophages into the heart, after experimental pressure overload, significantly lessened the heart's enlargement and reduced pumping ability that leads to later heart failure. (2018-03-19)

NRL researchers advance fleet weather predictions through innovation, collaboration
Accurately predicting weather for the US Navy is an essential part of keeping the fleet safe and effective as they execute maritime missions around the world. (2017-12-12)

New steps in the meiosis chromosome dance
Where would we be without meiosis and recombination? A new paper published online Jan. 6 in the journal Science describes how proteins called SUMO and ubiquitin and molecular machines called proteasomes play a crucial role in DNA recombination during meiosis. (2017-01-23)

'Birth control' for centrioles
Like DNA, centrioles need to duplicate only once per cell cycle. Rogers et al. uncover a long-sought mechanism that limits centriole copying, showing that it depends on the timely demolition of a protein that spurs the organelles' replication. (2009-01-26)

Without 'yoga and chardonnay' leukemia stem cells are stressed to death
University of Colorado Cancer Center researchers nix leukemia stem cell (LSC) stress-relief pathway to kill LSCs without harming healthy blood stem cells, paving the way for new therapies targeting these most dangerous cancer cells. (2018-06-14)

Ladies, this is why fertility declines with age
Researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Center (CRCHUM) have discovered a possible new explanation for female infertility. Thanks to cutting-edge microscopy techniques, they observed for the first time a specific defect in the eggs of older mice. This defect may also be found in the eggs of older women. The choreography of cell division goes awry, and causes errors in the sharing of chromosomes. These unprecedented observations are being published today in Current Biology. (2017-04-03)

The circadian clock controls the cell cycle and tumor growth in plants
Biological rhythms are ubiquitous in nature, from the beating of the heart to the rhythms of flowering plants. A research team led by the Spanish researcher, Paloma Mas, has shown that the two main cellular oscillators -- the circadian clock and the cell cycle -- are closely connected. The study demonstrates that the circadian clock controls the speed of the cell cycle, regulating the cell division and growth in synchronization with the day and night cycles. (2018-03-22)

Quiescent cells also mutate
For almost a hundred years, geneticists have believed that the more a cell divides the more mutations it acquires. However, research by scientists at the Institut Pasteur shows that quiescent cells, which do not divide, also acquire a particular type of mutation -- deletions (mutations through loss of nucleobases). (2018-02-26)

UBC researchers unlock secrets of plant development
University of British Columbia researchers have discovered an internal messaging system that plants use to manage the growth and division of their cells. Understanding this negative-feedback loop that helps plants survive under harsh conditions could enable innovations in agriculture, forestry and conservation as climate change takes hold. (2018-08-23)

Your cell phone could curb the intensity of your workout
Talking or texting on a cell phone during exercise will lower the intensity of a workout and also affect balance. (2017-01-13)

Common bacteria activating natural killer T cells may cause autoimmune liver disease
A bacteria commonly found in soil and water triggered autoimmune symptoms in mice similar to those found in an incurable liver disease called Primary Biliary Cirrhosis. Reporting their findings in the May 15 Cell Host & Microbe, the multi-institutional research team said injecting laboratory mice with the bacterium -- Novosphingobium aromaticivorans -- prompted activation of natural killer T cells, which were critical to initiating autoimmune processes that led to liver disease. (2008-05-14)

Scientists discover how gene mutation triggers immune disease
Scientists discovered how a gene mutation affects T cell function to promote immune disorders and then tested a treatment based on the discovery--successfully fixing donated immune cells from a 16-year-old boy with an abnormally low level of white blood cells called lymphopenia. Researchers report their findings Jan. 30 in Nature Communications. (2018-01-30)

Unlocking a cell's potential to regenerate the heart
Inspired by fish or salamanders that have a remarkable ability to repair their own injured organs, scientists have been trying for years to find a way to get human adult cells to divide and regenerate tissue in a similar way. A team at Gladstone, led by Deepak Srivastava, finally developed the first reliable method to make adult cells divide and repair hearts damaged by heart attacks, at least in animal models. (2018-03-01)

Mutant maize offers key to understanding plant growth
New findings by a University of California, Riverside-led team of researchers, lend support to the second idea, that the orientation of cell division is critical for overall plant growth. (2017-02-13)

Immune diversity among the KhoeSan population
By analyzing genes of two distinct groups of the KhoeSan, investigators were able to find a level of diversity and divergence in immune cell repertoires much higher than identified in any other population. The findings are described in an article published this month in The Journal of Immunology. (2018-04-20)

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