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A laser that smells like a hound
University of Adelaide researchers have created a laser that can 'smell' different gases within a sample. (2018-06-06)
App that will extend your smartphone battery life
New research out of the University of Waterloo has found a novel method to extend the battery life of smartphones for up to an hour each day. (2018-08-15)
Text messages quickly track health care use during Ebola outbreak
A new study from the NYU College of Global Public Health and NYU Tandon School of Engineering, published in Nature Digital Medicine, used text message surveys to determine in real time how people used maternal health services during a recent Ebola outbreak and measured a drop in hospital-based births during the outbreak. (2018-10-02)
New UTSA study shows wearable technology also contributes to distracted driving
A new study by Murtuza Jadliwala, assistant professor of computer science at The University of Texas at San Antonio, examines wearable technology and whether it affects drivers' concentration. (2018-04-23)
Guards of the human immune system unraveled
Dendritic cells represent an important component of the immune system: they recognize and engulf invaders, which subsequently triggers a pathogen-specific immune response. (2016-12-16)
Skin cancers linked with reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease
Previous studies have demonstrated a decreased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in individuals with various cancers, including non-melanoma skin cancers (including squamous cell cancers and basal cell cancers). (2018-04-19)
New study suggests rethink of dementia causes
University of Adelaide researchers have developed a new theory for the causes of dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases, involving an out-of-control immune system. (2016-05-12)
Researchers observe the switching of ras protein in detail
Ras proteins are molecular switches that decide if and when cells divide inside our bodies. (2018-03-21)
Cellphone technology developed to detect HIV
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have designed a portable and affordable mobile diagnostic tool, utilizing a cellphone and nanotechnology, with the ability to detect HIV viruses and monitor its management in resource-limited regions. (2018-11-09)
Dopamine conducts prefrontal cortex ensembles
New research in rodents reveals for the first time how dopamine changes the function of the brain's prefrontal cortex. (2019-04-02)
Purifying parasites with light
Researchers have developed a clever method to purify parasitic organisms from their host cells, which will allow for more detailed studies and a deeper insight into the biology of organisms that cause millions of cases of disease each year. (2008-09-12)
Cell cycle proteins help immune cells trap microbes with nets made of DNA
In your bloodstream, there are immune cells called neutrophils that, when faced with a pathogenic threat, will expel their DNA like a net to contain it. (2017-11-20)
High exposure to radiofrequency radiation linked to tumor activity in male rats
High exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) in rodents resulted in tumors in tissues surrounding nerves in the hearts of male rats, but not female rats or any mice, according to draft studies from the National Toxicology Program (NTP). (2018-02-02)
Solar cell design with over 50 percent energy-conversion efficiency
Solar cells convert the sun's energy into electricity by converting photons into electrons. (2017-04-23)
New finding will help target MS immune response
Researchers have made another important step in the progress towards being able to block the development of multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases. (2015-10-29)
Cell biology: Positioning the cleavage furrow
Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have identified a signaling pathway that restricts cleavage furrow formation to the mid-plane of the cell. (2018-01-11)
New UTSA study presents method to stop cyber attacks on GPS-enabled devices
A new study by researchers Nikolaos Gatsis, David Akopian and Ahmad F. (2018-03-19)
Generic mobile phone chargers escalate risk of burn, electrocution
Electric currents generated by mobile phone chargers, particularly from lower-cost generic manufacturers, are causing serious injuries. (2019-07-25)
A brave new world for coral reefs
It is not too late to save coral reefs, but we must act now. (2017-05-31)
Global research team fills language gap in plant science
To keep pace with the fast-evolving study of cellular plant science, an international team of researchers has created terminology and definitions likely to become everyday language in laboratories and university classrooms worldwide. (2017-10-03)
Mobile application detecting atrial fibrillation reduces the risk of stroke
A new application developed at the University of Turku, Finland, can detect atrial fibrillation that causes strokes. (2018-03-16)
Fat cells seem to remember unhealthy diet
Fat cells can be damaged in a short amount of time when they are exposed to the fatty acid palmitate or the hormone TNF-alpha through a fatty diet, a new study shows. (2018-04-20)
Smartphone health apps miss some daily activity of users
The iPhone's Health app and its built-in pedometer miss a significant number of users' steps during a typical day, a new University of British Columbia study has found. (2017-12-06)
Parents have more conflicts with their in-laws than do childless couples
Intergenerational relations include various forms of help and support but also tensions and conflicts. (2017-08-04)
An eco-friendly alternative to recycling e-waste
As consumers toss aside old cell phones, tablets and laptops to keep up with the latest technology, landfills are becoming full of the old devices. (2018-03-14)
Do cell phones increase brain cancer risk?
Major research initiatives are needed immediately to assess the possibility that using cellular phones may lead to an increased risk of brain tumors, according to an editorial in the November issue of the journal Surgical Neurology. (2008-10-20)
New laser to shine light on remote sensing
A revolutionary new type of laser developed by the University of Adelaide is promising major advances in remote sensing of greenhouse gases. (2016-04-04)
Glacier mass loss: Past the point of no return
Researchers from the Universities of Bremen and Innsbruck show in a recent study that the further melting of glaciers cannot be prevented in the current century -- even if all emissions were stopped now. (2018-03-19)
New blood pressure app and hardware rivals arm cuff accuracy
A team of Michigan State University scientists has created a new app and hardware for smartphones to measure blood pressure with accuracy that may rival arm-cuff devices. (2018-03-09)
Reading between the genes
For a long time dismissed as 'junk DNA,' we now know that also the regions between the genes fulfill vital functions. (2016-06-02)
Several genes that regulate the disease SLE have been identified
Swedish researchers, in collaboration with foreign colleagues, have identified a number of new genes that can be tied to the disease SLE, including a gene that hopefully might be used to treat the disease in the future by regulating the production of antibodies. (2008-01-22)
Why some drivers slow down when using mobile phones: QUT research
With mobile phone distracted driving a growing road safety issue, a QUT study reveals why some drivers slow down when using a mobile phone but others don't. (2017-01-24)
Why malaria mosquitoes like people with malaria
Malaria mosquitoes prefer to feed -- and feed more -- on blood from people infected with malaria. (2017-02-09)
Drivers don't ignore a ringing phone but do ignore the risk
Drivers find it difficult to ignore a ringing phone but do ignore the dangers, with a new QUT study revealing almost 50 percent believe locating and answering a ringing phone is not as risky as talking and texting. (2017-09-07)
Biomarkers facilitate early detection of glaucoma
Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have identified new potential biomarkers that may facilitate early detection of glaucoma in patients. (2018-10-25)
Army scientists revolutionize cybersecurity through quantum research
Army scientists have found a novel way to safeguard quantum information during transmission. (2018-11-21)
A map of the cell's power station
Researchers from the University of Freiburg are mapping the distribution of all proteins in mitochondria for the first time. (2017-08-18)
Association for Chemoreception Sciences (AChemS) 40th Annual Meeting
Smell and taste are vital senses that bring pleasure to daily life, inform us about our environment, and guide fundamental behaviors in humans and animals. (2018-04-17)
Better blood pressure control -- by mobile phone
An interactive web system with the help of your mobile phone can be an effective tool for better blood pressure control. (2015-11-25)
Xylitol reduces risk of cavities
The sugar substitute xylitol affects the bacterial composition of the oral cavity even in low doses. (2007-02-15)
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