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Talking with the doctor makes it easier to deal with grief and bereavement
In a comprehensive study, researchers from Aarhus University show that grieving patients who receive what is known as talk therapy at the general practitioner shortly after a relative's death, have a lower risk of suicide and psychiatric illness than others. Data from 207,000 million Danes is included in the register-based study, which can contribute to new practices in the preventative area. (2018-09-20)

Children with chronic illness often show signs of mental health problems
Researchers from the University of Waterloo surveyed children between the ages of six and 16, and all within a month of their diagnosis with asthma, food allergy, epilepsy, diabetes or juvenile arthritis. (2018-01-04)

Men place less value on care-oriented careers like nursing: UBC study
Men assign less importance to care-oriented careers than women do, possibly because men internalize different values than women, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia. (2018-08-20)

App that will extend your smartphone battery life
New research out of the University of Waterloo has found a novel method to extend the battery life of smartphones for up to an hour each day. (2018-08-15)

The mental health impact of pandemics for front line health care staff
New research shows the impact that pandemics have on the mental health of front-line health care staff. Researchers investigated how treating patients in past pandemics such as SARS and MERS affected the mental health of front-line staff. They found that over a third experienced anxiety or depression, almost a quarter experienced PTSD. The team hope that their work will help highlight the impact that the Covid-19 pandemic could be having on the mental health of doctors and nurses worldwide. (2020-10-16)

Type 2 diabetes and obesity -- what do we really know?
Social and economic factors have led to a dramatic rise in type 2 diabetes and obesity around the world. In a review in Science, Mark McCarthy, professor at the University of Oxford, UK, and Paul Franks, professor at Lund University, Sweden, examine the knowledge of the actual causes and the interplay between genetics and lifestyle factors. (2016-10-06)

Genetic analysis can improve depression therapy
The failure of SSRI antidepressants can be a result of genetic variations in patients. Variations within the gene that encodes the CYP2C19 enzyme results in extreme differences in the levels of escitalopram achieved in patients, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Diakonhjemmet Hospital in Norway published in The American Journal of Psychiatry. Prescribing the dose of escitalopram based on a patient's specific genetic constitution would greatly improve therapeutic outcomes. (2018-01-12)

Sub-national 'climate clubs' could offer key to combating climate change
'Climate clubs' offering membership for sub-national states, in addition to just countries, could speed up progress towards a globally harmonized climate change policy, which in turn offers a way to achieve stronger climate policies in all countries. This is the key finding of a new study by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB), recently published in the open-access journal Environmental Research Letters. (2020-01-15)

Training artificial intelligence with artificial X-rays
AI holds real potential for improving both the speed and accuracy of medical diagnostics -- but before clinicians can harness the power of AI to identify conditions in images such as X-rays, they have to 'teach' the algorithms what to look for. Now, U of T Engineering have designed a new approach: using machine learning to create computer generated X-rays to augment AI training sets. (2018-07-06)

Intestinal worms may solve allergy puzzle
Young people with parasite worms currently have a four times higher risk for developing allergies and asthma than others. (2017-12-04)

Monitor climate change, not predators, to protect lake diversity: Study
Climate change and other environmental factors are more threatening to fish diversity than predators, according to new research from the University of Guelph. It is a surprising and important finding, as humans rely upon freshwater lakes for more than one-fifth of their protein needs worldwide, says lead author Prof. Andrew MacDougall in U of G's Department of Integrative Biology. (2018-03-23)

New blood test for the detection of bovine TB
A new blood test to detect Mycobacteria in blood has been developed by a team at The University of Nottingham. The researchers have used this new method to show that cattle diagnosed with bovine tuberculosis (bTB) have detectable levels of the bacterium Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) in their blood which causes this disease. The research paper is available on request. (2016-05-31)

Premature hearts less able to cope with exercise
The hearts of people born prematurely are less able to cope with the pressures of exercise in adulthood, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and part-funded by the British Heart Foundation. (2018-03-19)

Ships in the English Channel have highest rate of sulphur violations in northern Europe
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have shown that between 87 and 98 percent of ships comply with the tougher regulations for sulphur emissions that were introduced in northern Europe in 2015. The lowest levels of compliance were observed in the western part of the English Channel and in the middle of the Baltic Sea. (2018-03-22)

Mercury rising: Are the fish we eat toxic?
Canadian researchers say industrial sea fishing may be exposing people in coastal and island nations to excessively high levels of mercury. (2018-05-03)

One in 10 people have traces of cocaine or heroin on their fingerprints
Scientists have found that drugs are now so prevalent that 13 percent of those taking part in a test were found to have traces of class A drugs on their fingerprints -- despite never using them. (2018-03-22)

New vaccine technique effectively fights breast cancer in mice
The body's own immune system can effectively fight breast cancer with the help of a new vaccine technique, researchers from the University of Copenhagen show in mice trials. The technique holds great potential if the effect translates to humans, the researchers find. (2017-11-30)

Census data can level the playing field for small businesses
Local governments and small businesses could save thousands of dollars a year in consulting and research fees if they just used information that's already publicly available, according to research from the University of Waterloo. (2018-04-03)

Researchers see significant reduction in fatal car crashes after increase in alcohol taxes
Increasing state alcohol taxes could prevent thousands of deaths a year from car crashes, say University of Florida Health researchers, who found alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes decreased after taxes on beer, wine and spirits went up in Illinois. (2015-03-31)

Social determinants of health linked to HIV mortality rates
People who are living with HIV in Ontario have access to good health care and medications, yet they are still dying younger and at substantially higher rates than the rest of the population, according to a new study published today. (2018-03-19)

Racism linked to uptake of smoking in young people
Adolescents who have experienced some form of racism between the ages of 11 and 23 are more likely to take up smoking than those who have not, according to a new study led by King's College London. (2018-01-24)

One in 10 people have 'near-death' experiences, according to new study
The new findings were presented at the 5th European Academy of Neurology (EAN) Congress. Experiences most frequently reported by participants in their study included: abnormal time perception (87 per cent), exceptional speed of thought (65 per cent), exceptionally vivid senses (63 per cent) and feeling separated from, or out of their body (53 per cent). (2019-06-28)

California's water saving brings bonus effects
Water-saving measures in California have also led to substantial reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and electricity consumption in the state. That is the conclusion of new research from the University of California, Davis, published today in the journal Environmental Research Letters. (2018-01-11)

Gluten intolerance appears largely undiagnosed in Canada
Research on a large sample of Canadians suggests that most people with celiac disease don't know they have it. (2017-10-06)

Wildlife conservation in North America may not be science-based after all
A study led by recent SFU Ph.D. alumnus Kyle Artelle has unveiled new findings that challenge the widespread assumption that wildlife management in North America is science-based. He conducted the study with SFU researchers John Reynolds and Jessica Walsh, as well as researchers from other institutions. (2018-03-07)

'European Muslims perceive the EU more positively than other Europeans'
For the first time, the Cluster of Excellence analyses the attitudes of European Muslims towards the EU - Far less sceptical than other groups such as Christians and those without religious affiliation - Reason probably lies with their relatively higher life satisfaction in their host country - Religiosity does not seem to influence the attitudes of Muslims towards the EU - Experiencing discrimination however threatens positive attitudes. (2017-10-27)

Otago study first to report benefits and safety of FODMAP diet in children
The low FODMAP diet, a diet low in carbohydrates that trigger digestive symptoms like bloating and stomach pain, is a useful treatment in children and adolescents with gastrointestinal problems, new University of Otago research confirms. (2019-09-23)

New findings concerning hereditary prostate cancer
For the first time ever, researchers have differentiated the risks of developing indolent or aggressive prostate cancer in men with a family history of the disease. Researchers from the Swedish universities of Lund, Uppsala and UmeƄ now present new and somewhat surprising results. (2016-07-11)

Two in 5 individuals with schizophrenia have attempted suicide
A new study by the University of Toronto (U of T), released today, found that those with schizophrenia who'd been physically abused during childhood were five times more likely to have attempted suicide. The lifetime prevalence of suicide attempts among individuals with schizophrenia was 39.2 percent compared to 2.8 percent of those without the disorder, according to the study. (2016-02-10)

Antibiotics could be cut by up to one-third, say dairy farmers
Nine in 10 dairy farmers participating in a new survey from the Royal Association of British Dairy Farmers (RADBF) say that the farming industry must take a proactive lead in the battle against antibiotic resistance. Those questioned also think that over the next five years they could cut their own antibiotic use by almost one-third in dry cow therapy and one-fifth in clinical mastitis. (2016-10-06)

Printable solar cells just got a little closer
A University of Toronto Engineering innovation could make printing solar cells as easy and inexpensive as printing a newspaper. Dr. Hairen Tan and his team have cleared a critical manufacturing hurdle in the development of a relatively new class of solar devices called perovskite solar cells. This alternative solar technology could lead to low-cost, printable solar panels capable of turning nearly any surface into a power generator. (2017-02-16)

Choose Omega-3s from fish over flax for cancer prevention, study finds
Omega-3s from fish pack a stronger punch than flaxseed and other oils when it comes to cancer prevention, according to a first-ever University of Guelph study. (2018-01-26)

Amazon rainforest losses impact on climate change, study shows
Human activity has removed more than one-tenth of trees and plants from the Amazon rainforest since the 1960s, a study shows. (2015-04-21)

Three in 4 don't know obesity causes cancer
Three out of four (75 percent) people in the UK are unaware of the link between obesity and cancer, according to a new Cancer Research UK report published today. (2016-09-08)

Could there be a 'social vaccine' for malaria?
Malaria is a global killer and a world health concern. But while millions of dollars are spent each year searching for innovative health solutions, new research from the University of Alberta suggests part of the answer may begin with mothers in the classroom. The research, published in the journal Pathogens and Global Health, found that maternal education can act as a 'social vaccine' for childhood malaria infection. The higher a mother's education, the lesser chance of their child being infected with malaria. (2017-05-09)

Some veggies each day keeps the stress blues away
Eating three to four servings of vegetables daily is associated with a lower incidence of psychological stress, new research by University of Sydney scholars reveals. (2017-03-15)

Flu vaccine prevents hospitalization in children
Children vaccinated against influenza are significantly less likely to experience serious complications from the virus that could land them in hospital, new research from Public Health Ontario (PHO) and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) has found. (2017-11-17)

Areas with more alcohol vendors have higher hospital admission rates
Places with the most pubs, bars and nightclubs had a 13 per cent higher hospital admission rate for acute conditions caused by alcohol. (2018-08-20)

Orange, tea tree & eucalyptus oils sweeten diesel fumes
Waste oil from orange, tea tree and eucalyptus essential oil production mixed with diesel provides a sweet-smelling biofuel blend with comparable performance to diesel-only fuel. (2018-06-15)

Canadians' consumption of fruit and vegetables drops 13 per cent in 11 years
Two surveys taken 11 years apart show a 13-per-cent decrease in the amount of fruit and vegetables being consumed by Canadians, new University of British Columbia research has found. And while consumption of milk and dairy products also declined during the study period between 2004 and 2015, Canadians were eating more meat and alternatives in 2015 than they were a decade earlier. (2019-03-08)

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