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Get better customer service by choosing your words wisely
The next time you make a complaint to your cellphone or cable company, don't get personal. (2016-12-12)

Britain's emissions dropped by 6 percent in 2016 by switching from coal to natural gas
Britain's emissions dropped by 6 percent in 2016 by switching from coal to natural gas a new study from the University of Sheffield has revealed. (2018-03-26)

Climate change to cause dramatic drop in Persian Gulf biodiversity and fisheries potential
The Persian Gulf, also known as the Arabian Gulf, may lose up to 12 per cent of its marine biodiversity in some areas before the end of the century if countries in the region do not take measures to address climate change. A business-as-usual climate scenario will severely affect species richness off the coast of Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) by the end of the century. (2018-05-02)

Antibiotic treatment targets difficult asthma
Hunter researchers have shown that a commonly available antibiotic can improve the quality of life of patients with difficult asthma, and may also generate significant health care savings. (2007-12-17)

Fish accounted for surprisingly large part of the Stone Age diet
New research at Lund University in Sweden can now show what Stone Age people actually ate in southern Scandinavia 10 000 years ago. The importance of fish in the diet has proven to be greater than expected. So, if you want to follow a Paleo diet -- you should quite simply eat a lot of fish. (2018-03-19)

Experts call for World Health Organization to rethink 'unacceptable' plans
The World Health Organization (WHO) has been accused of 'washing its hands of older people' in its proposed priorities for future work. In a letter published online in The Lancet, experts on ageing from the University of East Anglia (UEA) and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) say the draft WHO 13th General Programme of Work makes no reference to older people or to conditions associated with later life, such as dementia. (2018-01-04)

Victims of violence stop breastfeeding sooner
One in four women who have been victims of violence as adults are at risk of stopping breastfeeding before their baby is four months old. (2016-03-09)

Screening programs unlikely to prevent sudden cardiac arrest in competitive athletes
Screening programs for cardiac conditions are not an effective way to prevent sudden cardiac arrest in competitive sport, and may prevent healthy athletes from participating, a new study suggests. (2017-11-15)

Female sex offenders often have mental problems
Women who commit sexual offenses are just as likely to have mental problems or drug addictions as other violent female criminals. This according to the largest study ever conducted of women convicted of sexual offenses in Sweden. (2008-05-14)

Children bear the brunt of secondhand smoke in Bangladesh
Children in Bangladesh are being exposed to high levels of secondhand smoke despite laws banning smoking in public spaces, a study carried out by the University of York suggests. (2017-12-08)

Online intervention helps sustain weight loss
New research, led by the University of Southampton, has found that an online behavioural counselling tool is effective at helping people lose weight. (2016-07-26)

Renewable energy needed to drive uptake of electric vehicles
Plugging into renewable energy sources outweighs the cost and short driving ranges for consumers intending to buy electric vehicles, according to a new study. Queensland University of Technology Postdoctoral Research Fellow Dr. Kenan Degirmenci, from QUT Business School, said environmental performance -- or being green -- was more important than price or range confidence for electric vehicle consumers. (2017-04-03)

Energy drinks can negatively impact health of youth
Over half of Canadian youth and young adults who have consumed energy drinks have experienced negative health effects as a result, according to a study from the University of Waterloo. (2018-01-15)

Fasting diets reduce important risk factor for cardiovascular disease
Intermittent energy restriction diets such as the 5:2 diet clears fat from the blood quicker after eating meals compared with daily calorie restriction diets, reducing an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease, a new study in the British Journal of Nutrition reports. (2018-03-19)

Baltic clams and worms release as much greenhouse gas as 20,000 dairy cows
Scientists have shown that ocean clams and worms are releasing a significant amount of potentially harmful greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. (2017-10-13)

Cooling treatment reduces epilepsy in children
Cooling babies deprived of oxygen at birth (perinatal asphyxia) can reduce the number of children who develop epilepsy later in childhood, according to a new study published in the journal Epilepsia. (2017-10-03)

More diversity needed in medical school textbooks: Study
Depictions of race and skin tone in anatomy textbooks widely used in North American medical schools could be contributing to racial bias in medical treatment, new research suggests. (2018-03-01)

Construction delays make new nuclear power plants costlier than ever
The cost of building new nuclear power plants is nearly 20 percent higher than expected due to delays, a new analysis has found. (2018-05-29)

Smartphone health apps miss some daily activity of users
The iPhone's Health app and its built-in pedometer miss a significant number of users' steps during a typical day, a new University of British Columbia study has found. That's good news for people who self-monitor their physical activity; they are probably getting more exercise than they realize. But the results should raise some caution among researchers who want to tap into the smartphone's enormous potential for gathering health data. (2017-12-06)

Scientists pinpoint gene to blame for poorer survival rate in early-onset breast cancer patients
A new study led by scientists at the University of Southampton has found that inherited variation in a particular gene may be to blame for the lower survival rate of patients diagnosed with early-onset breast cancer. (2017-12-14)

Is back pain killing us?
Older people who suffer from back pain have a 13 per cent increased risk of dying from any cause, University of Sydney research has found. Published in the European Journal of Pain, the study of 4390 Danish twins aged more than 70 years investigated whether spinal pain increased the rate of all-cause and disease-specific cardiovascular mortality. (2017-02-23)

German nights get brighter -- but not everywhere
The nights in the German federal states („Bundesländer (2018-02-23)

Are you at risk for lung cancer?
This question isn't only for people who've smoked a lot. Seven factors, including two new ones, can predict whether you have a high risk of developing lung cancer. (2018-05-23)

Study: More people rely on government catastrophic drug plans
Government spending for the catastrophic drug program in Ontario rose 700 per cent between 2000 and 2016, during which there was a three-fold increase in the use of this plan, a new study has found. (2018-03-26)

ADHD may emerge after childhood for some people, according to new study
While it is well established that childhood ADHD may continue into adulthood, new research by King's College London suggests that for some people the disorder does not emerge until after childhood. (2016-05-18)

Study unravels the genetics of childhood 'overgrowth'
Researchers have undertaken the world's largest genetic study of childhood overgrowth syndromes -- providing new insights into their causes, and new recommendations for genetic testing. (2017-05-04)

Muslims face high rates of discrimination in Canada
One in five Muslim Canadians say they have experienced discrimination due to their religion, ethnicity or culture at least once in the past five years. (2018-03-19)

Our bodies may cure themselves of diabetes in the future
Our bodies may cure themselves of diabetes in the future. (2019-01-04)

Research reveals China's reversing emission flows
The flow of China's carbon emissions has reversed according to new research led by scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA). The study estimates the carbon implications of recent changes in the country's economic development patterns and role in international trade since the global financial crisis. (2017-11-23)

Cannabis: It matters how young you start
Canadian researchers find that boys who start smoking pot before 15 are much more likely to have a drug problem at 28 than those who start at 15 or after. (2018-05-18)

Majority of Canadians view physical inactivity as a serious public health issue
Physical inactivity is nearly on par with unhealthy diets and tobacco use as a public health concern among Canadians, a new UBC study has found. Approximately 55 per cent of respondents in a national survey of 2,519 people rated physical inactivity as a serious public health concern, compared with 58 per cent for unhealthy diets and 57 per cent for tobacco use. (2018-11-29)

Computational study of world music outliers reveals countries with distinct recordings
Botswana is the country with the most distinct musical recordings around the world while China has the most distinct recordings in relation to its neighbours, according to research by Queen Mary University of London. (2017-12-21)

New valve technology promises cheaper, greener engines
Technology developed at the University of Waterloo reliably and affordably increases the efficiency of internal combustion engines by more than 10 per cent. (2018-03-21)

Prostate problems also associated with sleep disorders and depression
Men who suffer from urological problems such as erectile dysfunction, urinary tract and bladder problems or infertility issues often also suffer from depression and sleep disorders. Physicians should therefore be aware of these risks so that they can refer their patients to relevant specialists and provide comprehensive and timely care of male patients. This is according to Arman Walia of the University of California Irvine in the US, in a study in the Springer Nature-branded IJIR: Your Sexual Medicine Journal. (2018-08-31)

Underestimating combined threats of deforestation and wildlife trade will push Southeast Asian birds
The combined impact of deforestation and wildlife exploitation on bird numbers is severely underestimated and could lead to some species becoming extinct, a joint study by the University of Sheffield and National University of Singapore has found. (2018-10-05)

New chromosome study can lead to personalised counselling of pregnant women
Foetuses with a specific, rare chromosomal aberration have a 20 per cent risk of a developmental disorder or another brain disorder, a new study conducted at the University of Copenhagen reveals. The findings may provide personalised diagnostics and counselling for these pregnant women. (2018-05-25)

Teen dating violence is down, but boys still report more violence than girls
When it comes to teen dating violence, boys are more likely to report being the victim of violence -- being hit, slapped, or pushed--than girls. That's the surprising finding of new research from the University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University. (2018-08-29)

Online game trains players how to sort waste correctly
A simple online game can teach people to more accurately sort waste--with lasting results, a new UBC study has found. Study participants who played the game developed by UBC researchers received immediate feedback on their sorting choices. The second time they played--when feedback was no longer provided--players still improved their average accuracy from 69 per cent to 84 per cent. Even when a week passed between games, players still improved their accuracy. (2018-12-11)

Study finds opportunity to increase opioid dependence treatment in Ontario jails
The study included completion of an online survey by 27 physicians, who reported working in 15 of 26 provincial correctional facilities for adults in Ontario. This included 10 of the 13 facilities with a population of more than 200. The study identified that about half of the physicians prescribed methadone and half prescribed buprenorphine/naloxone to treat opioid dependence. (2018-02-15)

Researchers find key to saving the world's lakes
After completing one of the longest running experiments ever done on a lake, researchers from the University of Alberta, University of Minnesota and the Freshwater Institute, contend that nitrogen control, in which the European Union and many other jurisdictions around the world are investing millions of dollars, is not effective and in fact, may actually increase the problem of cultural eutrophication. (2008-07-21)

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