Popular Cervical Cancer News and Current Events | Page 2

Popular Cervical Cancer News and Current Events, Cervical Cancer News Articles.
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Generating improvement in spinal cord injuries
Results from an ongoing treatment for spinal cord injury research study were announced on Jan. 24 in a conference held by Asterias, the biotechnology company that manufactures AST-OPC1. (2017-01-24)

New prostate cancer risk score could help guide screening decisions
A new score for predicting a man's genetic risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer could help guide decisions about who to screen and when, say researchers in The BMJ today. (2018-01-10)

Researchers reveal new mechanism to 'activate' the immune system against cancer
A new mechanism for activating the immune system against cancer cells allows immune cells to detect and destroy cancer cells better than before, and most effectively in lung cancer and melanoma. (2019-01-04)

New receptor genes turn T-cells into powerful liver cancer foes
Mouse genes that make human T cells powerful at fighting liver cancer could one day help patients do the same, scientists report. Georgia Cancer Center scientists exposed mice genetically manipulated to respond to human antigens to a common antigen found in human liver cancer. (2018-04-03)

World's 'better' countries have higher rates of cancer
The world's 'better' countries, with greater access to healthcare, experience much higher rates of cancer incidence than the world's 'worse off' countries, according to new research from the University of Adelaide. (2017-10-11)

Increase in lifestyle-related cancers over past decade spotlights need for prevention
Lifestyle-related cancers, such as lung, colorectal, and skin cancers, have increased globally over the past decade, according to the most comprehensive analysis of cancer-related health outcomes and patterns ever conducted. (2018-06-02)

Young cancer survivors have twice the risk of suicide
Survivors of cancer diagnosed before the age of 25 had a more than two-fold increased risk of suicide compared to their non-cancer peers. (2016-11-30)

Education and income determine whether women participate in cervical screening
The impression that foreign-born women in Sweden more often are excluded from gynecological cancer screening needs to be reconsidered. A study from Sahlgrenska Academy, published in the journal PLOS One, makes it clear that foreign-born women participate to the same extent as women born in Sweden with a corresponding educational level and income. (2018-01-11)

Self-sampling identifies twice as many women at risk of cervical cancer
Using self-sampling followed by HPV testing, more than twice as many women at risk of developing cervical cancer could be identified and offered preventive treatment. This is shown by researchers at Uppsala University in the first randomised study in the world comparing two ways of identifying cervical cancer, published today in the British Journal of Cancer. (2018-02-15)

Risk factors for prostate cancer
New research suggests that age, race and family history are the biggest risk factors for a man to develop prostate cancer, although high blood pressure, high cholesterol, vitamin D deficiency, inflammation of prostate, and vasectomy also add to the risk. In contrast, obesity, alcohol abuse, and smoking show a negative association with the disease. Details are reported in the International Journal of Medical Engineering and Informatics. (2015-09-29)

Research test identifies BRCA2 gene mutations that lead to breast, ovarian cancers
A new test developed by researchers at Mayo Clinic shows which mutations in the BRCA2 gene make women susceptible to developing breast or ovarian cancers. The research behind the test was published today in the American Journal of Human Genetics. (2018-01-25)

Gene-based test for urine detects, monitors bladder cancer
Researchers at The Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed a test for urine, gathered during a routine procedure, to detect DNA mutations identified with urothelial cancers. (2018-03-22)

Screening has had 'little impact' on falling breast cancer deaths in the Netherlands
Breast screening in the Netherlands seems to have had a marginal effect on breast cancer mortality over the past 24 years, suggests research in The BMJ today. (2017-12-05)

Hedgehog signaling proteins keep cancer stem cells alive
Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have discovered that the survival of cancer stem cells is dependent on the 'Hedgehog signaling pathway'. Targeting this pathway had previously shown no effect on the growth of colorectal cancer. Now, Charité scientists have demonstrated that using different drugs to target a specific aspect of the pathway may yield better treatment outcomes for patients. Results from this research have been published in the journal Cell Reports*. (2018-01-19)

Study finds breast and ovarian cancer may have similar origins
While breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide, ovarian cancer also is a significant source of mortality as the fifth leading cause of cancer death among women. These facts reflect the continued need for further understanding and innovation in cancer treatment. A new study published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences, describes a new concept of how these two cancers may evolve in a similar way and may eventually lead to more effective therapies for both. (2016-05-23)

Lung transplant patients face elevated lung cancer risk
In an American Journal of Transplantation study, lung cancer risk was increased after lung transplantation, especially in the native (non-transplanted) lung of single lung transplant recipients. (2018-12-19)

Exposure to common THM levels in drinking water not associated with breast cancer
Exposure to trihalomethanes (THMs) in residential water is not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. (2018-02-26)

New study shows potential to treat or prevent viral cancers
A new study, presented at the SNM 55th Annual Meeting, shows that radioimmunotherapy targeting viral antigens offers a novel option to treat -- or even prevent -- many viral cancers by targeting cancer cells expressing viral antigens or infected cells before they convert into malignancy. (2008-06-16)

2018 AACR Annual Meeting presentations highlight the clinical utility of Bio-Rad's Droplet Digital PCR technology for discovering epigenetic biomarkers and measuring immunotherapy response
Researchers showcase how droplet digital PCR technology can be used to identify epigenetic biomarkers to determine cancer recurrence after surgery and measure circulating tumor DNA for immunotherapy response. (2018-04-14)

'Lipofilling' technique found safe for reconstruction after breast cancer surgery
Autologous fat transfer, also known as 'lipofilling,' is a minimally invasive procedure in which the plastic surgeon uses the patient's own fat obtained by liposuction to perform breast reconstruction. (2018-06-06)

Complementary medicine for cancer can decrease survival
People who received complementary therapy for curable cancers were more likely to refuse at least one component of their conventional cancer treatment, and were more likely to die as a result, according to researchers from Yale Cancer Center and the Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research Center (COPPER) at Yale School of Medicine. The findings were reported today online in JAMA Oncology. (2018-07-19)

HPV vaccine is effective, safe 10 years after it's given
A decade of data on hundreds of boys and girls who received the HPV vaccine indicates the vaccine is safe and effective long term in protecting against the most virulent strains of the virus, researchers report. The findings support more widespread and early administration of the HPV vaccine before preadolescents and adolescents are exposed to the nation's most common sexually transmitted infection and the most common cause of cervical cancer, they report in the journal Pediatrics. (2017-11-29)

Protein analysis may reveal new cancer treatment targets
Researchers have used lab technology called mass spectrometry to study the proteins expressed by human cancer cells. (2018-06-15)

On the other hand, the immune system can also cause cancer
CU Cancer Center study describes how immune response designed to scramble viral DNA can scramble human DNA as well, sometimes in ways that cause cancer. (2017-08-23)

Insurance linked to black-white survival disparities in colorectal cancer
Health insurance coverage differences account for nearly one-half of the black-white survival disparity in colorectal cancer patients, according to a new study. (2017-11-14)

Large study on cancer in the Métis people of Canada
The incidence of all cancers combined was similar for Métis men and significantly higher for Métis women compared to non-Aboriginal men and women, found a study published in CMAJ. (2018-03-19)

Smokers might benefit from earlier colon cancer screening
New evidence suggests screening for colorectal cancer, which is now recommended to begin at age 50 for most people, should start five to 10 years earlier for individuals with a significant lifetime exposure to tobacco smoke, a University of Rochester Medical Center study said. (2008-02-13)

Minimally invasive surgery associated with worse survival for women with cervical cancer compared to open hysterectomy
When comparing standard-of-care surgical options for women with early-stage cervical cancer, two studies led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center discovered that minimally invasive radical hysterectomy is associated with higher recurrence rates and worse overall survival (OS), compared to abdominal radical hysterectomy. (2018-10-31)

Low accuracy found for tests used to predict risk of spontaneous preterm birth for women who have not given birth before
The use of two measures, fetal fibronectin (a protein) levels and transvaginal cervical length, had low predictive accuracy for spontaneous preterm birth among women who have not given birth before, according to a study appearing in the March 14 issue of JAMA. (2017-03-14)

Study shows cycling as number one cause of cervical fractures in men
Sporting-related cervical fractures increased by 35 percent from 2000 to 2015, mainly due to an increase in cycling-related injuries, according to research presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Men experienced the most fractures due to cycling, while the most common cause of fractures in women was horseback riding. The most common cause of cervical spine injury in the United States was football, with the majority of those injuries being sprains. (2018-03-06)

Ludwig scientists share new cancer research findings at 2018 AACR Annual Meeting
Ludwig Cancer Research released today the full scope of findings to be presented by Ludwig researchers at this year's American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting in Chicago, Ill., April 14-18, 2018. Research conducted by more than 100 Ludwig scientists will be presented in symposiums, plenaries, town meetings, education sessions and poster sessions. (2018-04-11)

Breast cancer detected in transmen undergoing mastectomy
The number of transmen seeking gender-confirming surgery has risen in the past decade. (2018-04-05)

Counting tumor cells in blood predicts treatment benefit in prostate cancer
Counting the number of tumor cells circulating in the bloodstream of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer can accurately predict how well they are responding to treatment, new results show. At the ESMO Conference Lugano organized by the European Society for Medical Oncology, researchers showed that changes in the number of circulating tumor cells predicted the outcome after chemotherapy in this hard to treat cancer. (2008-07-06)

Tapeworm drug fights prostate cancer
A medicine against parasites contains a substance that kills prostate and colon cancer. (2017-11-15)

Limiting tumors' ability to hide from the immune system
Scientists have discovered a way to stop tumors from shedding certain proteins that the immune system uses to identify and attack tumors. (2018-03-29)

Scientists have identified the presence of cancer-suppressing cells in pancreatic cancer
Researchers have identified cells containing a protein called Meflin that has a role in restraining the progression of pancreatic cancer. They have also shown that cancer progression can be controlled by artificially increasing the amount of this protein in the cells. These findings could lead to the development of new therapies against pancreatic cancer. (2019-10-07)

Genetic predictors of esophageal cancer identified
Researchers have identified 11 genotypes that may increase esophageal cancer risk, according to research published in the November issue of Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (2008-11-05)

Improving cervical cancer screening rates for transgender men
A new study indicates that alternative options for cervical cancer screening, including self-sampling for human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, could improve the screening rate among transgender men. (2017-09-08)

New focus on where heart disease and breast cancer treatment meet
The American Heart Association has released the first scientific statement about heart disease and breast cancer, calling for more research and collaboration between the fields of oncology and cardiology to treat and prevent both diseases. (2018-02-01)

Skin bacteria help cancer cells grow
Our skin is covered in millions of bacteria and most of them help keep us healthy. However, for patients with lymphoma, it may be a rather different story, as new research from the University of Copenhagen shows that toxins in the staphylococcus bacteria help cancer cells gain control over healthy cells. The Danish Cancer Society's Break Cancer Collection contributed DKK 3 million (US$0.5 million) to the research project. (2016-01-06)

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