Popular Cheetah News and Current Events

Popular Cheetah News and Current Events, Cheetah News Articles.
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Fun run
Attention runners: The next time you go out for a jog, you might want to strap a light resistance band between your feet. This rather quirky but oddly effective hack, according to UC Santa Barbara mechanical engineer Elliot Hawkes, could make you a more efficient runner by approximately 6.4%. (2019-10-08)

Cheetahs' inner ear is one-of-a-kind, vital to high-speed hunting
The world's fastest land animal, the cheetah, is a successful hunter not only because it is quick, but also because it can hold an incredibly still gaze while pursuing prey. For the first time, researchers have investigated the cheetah's extraordinary sensory abilities by analyzing the speedy animal's inner ear, an organ that is essential for maintaining body balance and adapting head posture during movement in most vertebrates. (2018-02-02)

Maasai farmers only kill lions when they attack livestock
Maasai farmers do not kill lions for retribution whenever they lose sheep or cattle, new research shows. (2019-02-26)

Study reveals new insight into how cheetahs catch their prey
A new research study has revealed that the cheetah, the world's fastest land animal, matches and may even anticipate the escape tactics of different prey when hunting, rather than just relying on its speed and agility, as previously thought. (2013-09-05)

Scientists urge endangered listing for cheetahs
A comprehensive assessment of cheetah populations in southern Africa supported by the National Geographic Society reveals the dire state of one of the planet's most iconic big cats. In a study published today in the open-access journal PeerJ, researchers present evidence that low cheetah population estimates in southern Africa and population decline support a call to list the cheetah as 'Endangered' on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. (2017-12-11)

Using dogs to find cats
Investigators are using specially-trained detection dogs to determine the numbers and distribution of cheetah in a region of Western Zambia. The research represents the first demonstration of this strategy for wide-ranging species that are often threatened. (2017-02-23)

Leopard meals: Females go for diversity
Leopards, top predators of the African savannah, are known to feed on a variety of prey species. It has been largely unknown, however, whether they specialize in certain prey animals and which factors might influence prey preferences. Christian Voigt and his colleagues from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin investigated these questions by studying the diet of leopards on commercial farmland in central Namibia. (2018-05-08)

Biomechanics of chewing depend more on animal size, not diet
Researchers report that the jaw joint bone, the center around which chewing activity revolves (literally), appears to have evolved based more on an animal's size than what it eats. (2018-08-30)

Southern Africa's cheetah population much smaller than believed
Populations of cheetahs in southern Africa have declined as farming and other human activities push deeper into the big cats' range, a study led by researchers at Duke University and the Claws Conservancy finds. Fewer than 3,600 adult cheetahs - 11 percent fewer than estimated in 2015 - remain in the region, which is home to the largest population of free-roaming cheetahs left on Earth. Farmer-cheetah conflicts and other human-related pressures are contributing to the decline. (2017-12-12)

How cheetahs outsmart lions and hyenas
Cheetahs in the Serengeti National Park adopt different strategies while eating to deal with threats from top predators such as lions or hyenas. A new study in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology shows that male cheetahs and single females eat their prey as quickly as possible. Mothers with cubs, on the other hand, watch out for possible threats while their young are eating in order to give them enough time to eat their fill. (2018-04-10)

'Blind' Cheetah 3 robot can climb stairs littered with obstacles
MIT's Cheetah 3 robot can now leap and gallop across rough terrain, climb a staircase littered with debris, and quickly recover its balance when suddenly yanked or shoved, all while essentially blind. The 90-pound mechanical beast -- about the size of a full-grown Labrador -- is intentionally designed to do all this without relying on cameras or any external environmental sensors. (2018-07-05)

Lung lavage as new test method improves tuberculosis diagnosis in rhinoceros
An international team of scientists led by institutes in Berlin and Jena, Germany, performed repeated lung lavage as a new approach for tuberculosis diagnosis in rhinoceros. Subsequent genetic tests reliably identified mycobacteria in the animals' respiratory fluids -- with minimal stress and risk for the rhinos. The study has been published in the journal PLOS ONE. (2018-12-12)

Revealing the remarkable nanostructure of human bone
Using advanced 3D nanoscale imaging of the mineral in human bone, research teams from the University of York and Imperial College London have shown that the mineral crystals of bone have a hierarchical structure integrated into the larger-scale make-up of the skeleton. (2018-05-03)

In the race of life, the tortoise beats the hare every time
Researchers have discovered that, over the long-run, the race will indeed go to the slower, steadier animal. An analysis of the reported speeds of animals based on land, air and water shows that some of the world's fastest animals are actually some of the slowest when their movements are averaged throughout their lifetimes, giving credence to Aesop's fable 'The Tortoise and the Hare.' (2018-08-27)

Mini cheetah is the first four-legged robot to do a backflip
MIT's new mini cheetah robot is springy and light on its feet, with a range of motion that rivals a champion gymnast. The four-legged powerpack can bend and swing its legs wide, enabling it to walk either right-side up or upside down. The robot can also trot over uneven terrain about twice as fast as an average person's walking speed. (2019-03-04)

Wild cat brains: An evolutionary curveball
The brains of wild cats don't necessarily respond to the same evolutionary pressures as those of their fellow mammals, humans and primates, indicates a surprising new study led by a Michigan State University neuroscientist. (2016-10-31)

Physicists use terahertz flashes to uncover state of matter hidden by superconductivity
A research team led by Jigang Wang of Iowa State University and the Ames Laboratory has developed a new quantum switching scheme that gives them access to new and hidden states of matter. If researchers can learn to control the hidden state, further stabilize it and determine whether it's suitable for quantum logic operations, it could allow researchers to use it for quantum computing and other practical functions. The journal Nature Materials has just published a paper about the discovery. (2018-06-04)

Mammals' complex spines are linked to high metabolisms; we're learning how they evolved
Mammals' backbones are weird. They're much more complex than the spines of other land animals like reptiles. Scientists wanted to find out how these complex backbones evolved in the first place. They discovered that the process was marked by big, dramatic evolutionary changes, and that it's linked to mammals being active animals with high metabolisms. (2019-11-07)

Inspired by cheetahs, researchers build fastest soft robots yet
Inspired by the biomechanics of cheetahs, researchers have developed a new type of soft robot that is capable of moving more quickly on solid surfaces or in the water than previous generations of soft robots. The new soft robotics are also capable of grabbing objects delicately -- or with sufficient strength to lift heavy objects. (2020-05-08)

Subconscious mental connection between blacks, apes may reinforce subtle discrimination
Many US citizens may not hold openly racist beliefs today, but they still may subconsciously link African Americans with apes because people still use words and metaphors that subtly reinforce a less-than-human bias and endorse violence against Blacks, according to a new study. (2008-03-05)

Guard dogs reduce killing of threatened species
Research from the University of Kent has revealed that guarding dogs can significantly reduce conflict between livestock and large carnivores, such as cheetahs or leopards, helping to reduce unwarranted killing of endangered species in South Africa. (2013-11-26)

Dinosaur-era plant found alive in North America for first time
A large species of green algae was discovered alive in North America for the first time ever, with the only previous record being fossils dating back to the time of the dinosaurs. (2017-07-31)

Nova Southeastern University researcher part of team researching DNA of tigers
A 10-year study looked at DNA similarities of tigers -- living and extinct -- in order to better understand these animals as well as provide a new, more powerful tool for wildlife protection and, hopefully, reducing illegal wildlife commerce. (2015-03-20)

Preservation of testicular cells to save endangered feline species
A research team at the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) developed a method to isolate and cryopreserve testicular cells. This will allow the safekeeping and biobanking of gametes and other cells of the male reproductive tract of threatened or endangered feline species. The findings have been published in the scientific journal 'Cryobiology.' (2020-03-31)

Evolutionary 'selection of the fittest' measured for the first time
A difference of one hundredth of a percent in fitness is sufficient to select between winners and losers in evolution. For the first time researchers have quantified the tiny selective forces that shape bacterial genomes. The story is published today in the prestigious journal PLOS Genetics. (2016-03-10)

Are you smarter than a 5-year-old? Preschoolers can do algebra
Most preschoolers and kindergarteners, or children between four and six, can do basic algebra naturally using their Approximate Number System. (2014-03-06)

Study highlights power of play
Through simple games and day-to-day tasks, parents can help their children learn self-regulation, a skill considered essential for success, a University of Otago, New Zealand, study has found. (2019-03-21)

A rare glimpse at the elusive Saharan cheetah
Research by scientists and conservationists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the Zoological Society of London, and other groups published today in PLOS ONE shows that critically endangered Saharan cheetahs exist at incredibly low densities and require vast areas for their conservation. The research also offers some of the world's only photographs of this elusive big cat. (2015-01-29)

Thai dinosaur is a cousin of T. rex
Scientists from the University of Bonn and the Sirindhorn Museum in Thailand have identified two new dinosaur species. They analyzed fossil finds that were already discovered 30 years ago in Thailand. Both species are distant relatives of T. rex, but with a somewhat more primitive structure. They were efficient predators. The results have now been published in the journal Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. (2019-05-28)

Territory holders and floaters: Two spatial tactics of male cheetahs
Scientists of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz IZW) in Berlin analysed the spatial behaviour of cheetahs. They showed that male cheetahs operate two space use tactics which are associated with different life-history stages. This long-term study on movement data of over 160 free-ranging cheetahs in Namibia has now been published in the scientific journal ECOSPHERE. (2018-06-28)

Timing may be key to understanding cognitive problems in Parkinson's disease
University of Iowa research shows that people with Parkinson's disease (PD) and mice that lack dopamine both are missing a critical brain wave needed for timing actions -- a cognitive process that's consistently impaired in patients with PD. Brain stimulation at the same frequency as the missing brain wave restores timing ability in mice lacking dopamine, suggesting that it might be possible to use brain stimulation to improve cognitive problems in PD. (2016-12-15)

Early first pregnancy is the key to successful reproduction of cheetahs in zoos
Cheetah experts in many zoos around the world are at a loss. Despite all their efforts, these cats often do not reproduce in the desired manner. Researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, together with colleagues from the Allwetterzoo M√ľnster, have now found a key to the issue: the age of the mothers at the first pregnancy is the decisive factor. (2019-07-09)

Man-made borders threaten wildlife as climate changes
Walls and fences designed to secure national borders could make it difficult for almost 700 mammal species to adapt to climate change, according to new research. (2021-02-08)

African lions under same threats as extinct sabre-toothed tigers faced
African lions are under the same threats extinct sabre-toothed tigers faced. (2017-05-10)

Divergences between scientific and Indigenous and Local Knowledge can be helpful
Divergences between scientific and Indigenous and Local Knowledge can provide a better understanding of why local pastoralists may be willing, or not, to participate in conservation initiatives for carnivores, a study from University of Helsinki suggests. (2021-01-15)

Eye size determined by maximum running speed in mammals
Maximum running speed is the most important variable influencing mammalian eye size other than body size, according to new research from the University of Texas at Austin. (2012-05-02)

T. rex more hyena than lion
Was T. rex really the king of the forest? A new census of dinosaurs in Montana's Hell Creek Formation shows that T. rex was far too abundant to be a top predator. Paleontologists Jack Horner of the Museum of the Rockies and Mark Goodwin of UC Berkeley argue that T. rex probably subsisted on a broad variety of dead as well as live animals, much like today's hyena. (2011-02-22)

In Iran, cheetahs collared for the first time
An international team of scientists led by the Wildlife Conservation Society working in Iran has successfully fitted two Asiatic cheetahs with Global Positioning System (GPS) collars, marking the first time this highly endangered population of big cats can be tracked by conservationists. (2007-03-01)

Why Tyrannosaurus was a slow runner
A beetle is slower than a mouse, which is slower than a rabbit, which is slower than a cheetah... which is slower than an elephant? No! For small to medium-sized animals, larger also means faster, but for really large animals, when it comes to speed, everything goes downhill again. For the first time, researchers have described in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution how this parabola-like relationship between body size and speed comes about. (2017-07-17)

African lions face same threats as extinct Ice Age ancestors
The extinction trends that caused the demise of several Ice Age species, including many of the sabre-toothed family, may be a threat to wildlife today and particularly to the African lion, a new Oxford University research collaboration has revealed. (2017-05-10)

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