Popular Chemical Reaction News and Current Events

Popular Chemical Reaction News and Current Events, Chemical Reaction News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Rust never sleeps
PNNL researchers have been able to observe in unprecedented detail how rust happens. (2019-02-04)

Bio-fuel from waste
Fuel from waste? It is possible. But hitherto, converting organic waste to fuel has not been economically viable. Excessively high temperatures and too much energy are required. Using a novel catalyst concept, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now managed to significantly reduce the temperature and energy requirements of a key step in the chemical process. The trick: The reaction takes place in very confined spaces inside zeolite crystals. (2017-06-28)

From sea to lab
With its vast numbers of different lifeforms, the sea is a largely unexplored source of natural products that could be starting points for new pharmaceuticals, such as the antitumor drugs trabectedin and lurbinectedin. Because only tiny amounts can be obtained from sea organisms, synthetic production is necessary. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have introduced a new, efficient synthetic route for these two drugs. A key step is the light-controlled activation of a carbon-hydrogen bond. (2019-02-18)

Converting CO2 into usable energy
Scientists show that single nickel atoms are an efficient, cost-effective catalyst for converting carbon dioxide into useful chemicals. (2018-03-01)

New material cleans and splits water
Researchers at EPFL's Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering have developed a photocatalytic system based on a material in the class of metal-organic frameworks. The system can be used to degrade pollutants present in water while simultaneously producing hydrogen that can be captured and used further. (2018-11-05)

Scientist devises a solar reactor to make water and oxygen from moon rocks
With the successful test of this solar reactor design, Denk has achieved the first step, creating H2O on the Moon using solar thermal energy. For the second step, solar electrolysis would break the H2O into hydrogen and oxygen. (2017-10-26)

Chemical hydrogen storage system
Hydrogen is a highly attractive, but also highly explosive energy carrier, which requires safe, lightweight and cheap storage as well as transportation systems. Scientists at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel, have now developed a chemical storage system based on simple and abundant organic compounds. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the liquid hydrogen carrier system has a high theoretical capacity and uses the same catalyst for the charging-discharging reaction. (2019-03-07)

Scientists turn carbon emissions into usable energy
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a system that turn carbon emissions into usable energy. (2019-01-19)

Physicists build muscle for shape-changing, cell-sized robots
A Cornell University team has made a robot exoskeleton that can rapidly change its shape upon sensing chemical or thermal changes in its environment. And, they claim, these microscale machines -- equipped with electronic, photonic and chemical payloads -- could become a powerful platform for robotics at the size scale of biological microorganisms. (2018-01-03)

MIT engineers develop a new way to remove carbon dioxide from air
A new way of removing carbon dioxide from a stream of air could provide a significant tool in the battle against climate change. The new system can work on the gas at virtually any concentration level, even down to the roughly 400 parts per million currently found in the atmosphere. (2019-10-25)

Novel technology for anticancer drug delivery on demand
With the goal of minimizing the side effects of chemotherapy on healthy tissues, IBS scientists have developed novel nanocontainers able to deliver anticancer drugs at precise timing and location. They combines uniquely designed molecules and light-dependent drug release, which may provide a new platform to enhance the effect of anticancer therapeutics. (2018-03-09)

The fast dance of electron spins
Metal complexes show a fascinating behavior in their interactions with light, which for example is utilized in organic light emitting diodes, solar cells, quantum computers, or even in cancer therapy. In many of these applications, the electron spin, a kind of inherent rotation of the electrons, plays an important role. Sebastian Mai and Leticia González from the University of Vienna succeeded in simulating the extremely fast spin flip processes that are triggered by the light absorption of metal complexes. (2019-10-04)

New test may quickly identify mild traumatic brain injury with underlying brain damage
A new test using peripheral vision reaction time could lead to earlier diagnosis and more effective treatment of mild traumatic brain injury, often referred to as a concussion. (2017-02-16)

Verifying that sorghum is a new safe grain for people with celiac disease
Strong new biochemical evidence exists showing that the cereal grain sorghum is a safe food for people with celiac disease, who must avoid wheat and certain other grains, scientists are reporting. Their study, which includes molecular evidence that sorghum lacks the proteins toxic to people with celiac disease, appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. (2013-04-03)

Exploring electrolysis for energy storage
A research team at Kyushu University's International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (I2CNER) developed a flow-type polymer electrolyte cell for power storage. The cell reduces oxalic acid (OX) to glycolic acid, which has a higher volumetric energy-storage capacity than hydrogen gas. Newly fabricated TiO2 cathode enhanced the speed and efficiency of OX reduction. This competitive energy-storage device could be used to balance out the fluctuations in renewable power supplies. (2018-01-02)

'Workhorse' lithium battery could be more powerful thanks to new design
Cornell University chemical engineering professor Lynden Archer believes there needs to be a battery technology 'revolution' -- and thinks that his lab has fired one of the first shots. (2018-06-25)

New chemical method could revolutionize graphene
University of Illinois at Chicago scientists have discovered a new chemical method that enables graphene to be incorporated into a wide range of applications while maintaining its ultra-fast electronics. (2017-06-14)

Russian chemists developed a way to synthesize drugs from renewable precursors
The scientists of RUDN University together with their Russian colleagues have developed a new approach to the synthesis of benzofurans from cheap raw materials. Original furans can be produced from wastes of agriculture and wooworking industry, such as sawdust, cobs and other by-products of crop production. The results of the work were described in the article published in Tetrahedron. (2017-11-14)

New electro-organic synthesis allows sustainable and green production of fine chemicals
In the cooperative EPSYLON research project, scientists from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and Evonik Performance Materials GmbH have succeeded in developing a state-of-the-art and innovative electro-organic synthesis. (2017-10-06)

The unbelievable speed of electron emission from an atom
In a unique experiment, researchers have clocked how long it takes for an electron to be emitted from an atom. The result is 0.000 000 000 000 000 02 seconds, or 20 billionths of a billionth of a second. The researchers' stopwatch consists of extremely short laser pulses. Hopefully, the results will help to provide new insights into some of the most fundamental processes in nature. (2017-11-13)

New method for engineering metabolic pathways
Two approaches provide a faster way to create enzymes and analyze their reactions, leading to the design of more complex molecules. (2019-06-05)

Optical tweezers steer a chemical reaction from just 2 atoms
Highlighting the fine level of control modern chemists possess, researchers have trapped two single atoms -- sodium and cesium -- in separate 'optical tweezers' and then maneuvered them together, resulting in a single molecule of sodium cesium (NaCs) with unique properties. (2018-04-12)

Discovery of a crucial immune reaction when solid food is introduced that prevents inflammatory disorders
In newborn infants, gut microbiota is first conditioned by breast milk components. When solid food is introduced, gut microbiota develops and bacteria proliferate. Scientists have discovered that a key immune response is generated in mice when solid food is introduced and microbiota expands. But, above all, they have shown that this immune reaction is essential as it is involved in educating the immune system and leads to low susceptibility to inflammatory disorders in adulthood. (2019-03-19)

New insight into enzyme evolution
How enzymes -- the biological proteins that act as catalysts and help complex reactions occur -- are 'tuned' to work at a particular temperature is described in new research from groups in New Zealand and the UK, including the University of Bristol. (2016-03-03)

VCU physicists discover a tri-anion particle with colossal stability
A team in the lab of Puru Jena, Ph.D., a distinguished professor in the Department of Physics in the College of Humanities and Sciences at Virginia Commonwealth University, has created the most stable tri-anion particle currently known to science. A tri-anion particle is a combination of atoms that contains three more electrons than protons. This discovery is novel because previously known tri-anion particles were unstable due to their numerical imbalance. (2017-09-18)

Epigenetic editing reveals surprising insights into early breast cancer development
Changing the epigenetic code of a single gene is enough to cause a healthy breast cell to begin a chain reaction and become abnormal, according to research by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). (2017-11-13)

Sweat, bleach and gym air quality
One sweaty, huffing, exercising person emits as many chemicals from their body as up to five sedentary people, according to a new University of Colorado Boulder study. And notably, those human emissions, including amino acids from sweat or acetone from breath, chemically combine with bleach cleaners to form new airborne chemicals with unknown impacts to indoor air quality. (2021-01-05)

A powerful catalyst for electrolysis of water that could help harness renewable energy
An international collaboration of Scientists at Dongguk University developed a novel nickel-based hydroxide compound that can be used as a powerful catalyst for the electrolysis of water. This material could also be useful for developing renewable energy sources. (2019-01-25)

Multiresponsive nanosurfactant constructs tiny chemical factory
IBS scientists have made a surfactant based on nanoparticle dimers, which is responsive to multiple stimuli. The nanosurfactant combines several characteristics of each 'active' molecular surfactant which allows a tremendous flexibility whereby liquid droplets can be manipulated. (2018-01-10)

Searching beyond graphene for new wonder materials
Graphene, the two-dimensional, ultra lightweight and super-strong carbon film, has been hailed as a wonder material since its discovery in 2004. Now researchers are going beyond graphene and preparing other 2-D films with extraordinary properties for applications in wearable electronics, sensors and energy storage. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, surveys this expanding landscape. (2017-05-31)

Adding hydrogen to graphene
IBS researchers report a fundamental study of how graphene is hydrogenated. (2016-11-03)

Nanoparticles remain unpredictable
The way that nanoparticles behave in the environment is extremely complex. There is currently a lack of systematic experimental data to help understand them comprehensively, as ETH environmental scientists have shown in a large overview study. A more standardized approach would help to advance the research field. (2017-04-19)

Manganese dioxide shows potential in micromotors
Manganese dioxide could make the preparation of micromotors increasingly cost-effective, opening up new avenues for their use, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. (2017-11-14)

The 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Cryo-electron microscopy explained (video)
Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson have claimed this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry. The trio earned the prize for their work on cryo-electron microscopy, which is an imaging technique that lets researchers see proteins and other large biomolecules with atomic precision. Learn more about this discovery and its impact in this video from Speaking of Chemistry: https://youtu.be/026rzTXb1zw. (2017-10-05)

Chemically tailored graphene
Graphene is considered as one of the most promising new materials. However, the systematic insertion of chemically bound atoms and molecules to control its properties is still a major challenge. Now, for the first time, scientists of the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, the University of Vienna, the Freie Universität Berlin and the University Yachay Tech in Ecuador succeeded in precisely verifying the spectral fingerprint of such compounds in both theory and experiment. (2017-05-08)

In the surcharge blame game, companies tend to finish last
Companies may bear the brunt of the blame for imposing surcharges on consumers, even when an outside agency foisted those charges on the company, according to an international team of researchers. (2018-04-19)

Galaxies that feed on other galaxies
An international team of astronomers led by Giuseppina Battaglia, researcher at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), finds signs that the outer halo of the Milky Way contains stellar remains of massive dwarf galaxies that were devoured by our own. (2018-01-31)

Reversing aging now possible!
DGIST's research team identified the mechanism of reversible recovery of aging cells by inducing lysosomal activation. The team opened a new horizon of aging recovery research by changing the irreversibility paradigm of aging. (2017-04-03)

Russian scientists developed a new technology of energy generation from bituminous coal
A team from Ural Federal University (UrFU) developed a new efficient technology of electrical power generation from bituminous coal. The results of the study were published in International Journal of Hydrogen Energy. (2017-12-15)

Missile strikes against Syria 'as serious as triggering events,' expert says
The University of Notre Dame's Mary Ellen O'Connell says reprisal attacks are a serious breach of the United Nations charter. (2018-04-12)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.