Popular Chemokines News and Current Events

Popular Chemokines News and Current Events, Chemokines News Articles.
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Mobilizing white blood cells to the lung: New discovery could lead to an improved influenza vaccine
Findings just published in the scientific journal Immunity by researchers at the Trudeau Institute shed new light on how a previously-unknown messaging mechanism within the human immune system prompts specific influenza-fighting cells to the lung airways during an infection. (2008-07-10)

Secretome of pleural effusions associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and malignant meso
Cryopreserved cell-free PE fluid from 101 NSCLC patients, 8 mesothelioma and 13 with benign PE was assayed for a panel of 40 cytokines/chemokines using the Luminex system. (2019-11-05)

New biomarkers of multiple sclerosis pathogenesis
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic debilitating inflammatory disease targeting the brain. The pathogenesis of MS remains largely unknown. It is believed that brain tissue damage is due to immune cells targeting and breaking up the myelin basic protein (MBP), which is essential for nerve cells function. (2017-05-19)

How tumors caused by STD quickly regress in dogs
The canine transmissible venereal tumor is a contagious cancer that has spread by mating among dogs worldwide. One unique feature of this cancer is that, for unclear reasons, it regresses spontaneously or a few weeks after a single treatment of radiotherapy or chemotherapy. A study published April 9 in the journal Cancer Cell shines a light on this mystery, revealing a key role for the immune system in triggering fast cancer rejection in chemotherapy-treated dogs. (2018-04-09)

Immune cell target that may prevent or delay heart failure after pressure overload
Researchers have identified a therapeutic target to prevent or delay heart failure from pressure overload of the heart, and a potential biomarker for the same. They say their animal studies carry clinical and translational potential. Mouse-model experiments showed that preventing the early infiltration of CCR2+ macrophages into the heart, after experimental pressure overload, significantly lessened the heart's enlargement and reduced pumping ability that leads to later heart failure. (2018-03-19)

Inflammation: It takes two to tango
Signal molecules called chemokines often work in tandem to recruit specific sets of immune cells to sites of tissue damage. A systematic analysis of their interactions by researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich pinpoints potential targets for new therapies. (2017-04-06)

Study describes enzyme's key role in immune response to Chagas disease parasite
A study shows that the expression of PI3Kγ protein increases during infection by T. cruzi, an essential response in avoiding excessive inflammation and controlling parasitemia. Heart tissue analyses involving human patients who developed cardiopathy in the disease's chronic stage also provided results. The next challenge is to devise treatment for Chagas using molecules capable of modulating the cellular signaling pathway mediated by PI3Kγ. (2018-07-13)

Immunology: How ancestry shapes our immune cells
A genetic variant that is particularly prevalent in people of African ancestry confers protection against malaria. LMU researchers have now shown how it modulates the properties of white blood cells that play a major role in immune defenses and inflammation. (2017-06-01)

The sneaky way estrogen drives brain metastasis in non-estrogen-dependent breast cancers
University of Colorado Cancer Center study shows that while estrogen doesn't directly affect triple-negative breast cancer cells, it can affect surrounding brain cells in ways that promote cancer cell migration and invasiveness (2019-03-01)

Structure of atypical cancer protein paves way for drug development
A team of researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has helped uncover the elusive structure of a cancer cell receptor protein that can be leveraged to fight disease progression. (2017-01-18)

Specialized white blood cells coordinate first responders to viral infection
Regulatory T cells are thought to call a halt to immune reponses as the fight against infection draws to a close. Researchers have evidence that these cells also help coordinate the early stages of the fight against viral infections. (2008-04-24)

Scientists identify immune cascade that fuels complications, tissue damage in chlamydia infections
Research in mice pinpoints immune mechanism behind tissue damage and complications of chlamydia infection, the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States. Separate immune mechanisms drive bacterial clearance versus immune-mediated tissue damage and subsequent disease. Therapies are needed to avert irreversible reproductive organ damage that can arise as a result of silent infections that go untreated. (2018-02-13)

Protein derived from parasite has potential to alleviate debilitating disease
A Children's-led research team has turned the tables on Schistosoma haematobium, a parasitic worm that freeloads in humans, by using a protein derived from the parasite as a therapeutic molecule to reduce bleeding and pain associated with chemotherapy-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. (2018-04-03)

New approach for treatment of contact allergy
Researchers from the University of Bonn have isolated a molecule that is suitable for the control of contact allergies. The study illuminates a central immune mechanism, which may also play a role in other inflammatory diseases such as arthritis or arteriosclerosis. The results will soon be published in the journal Molecular Therapy, but are already available online. (2017-10-30)

Prenatal exposure to malaria may determine disease susceptibility early in life
Prenatal exposure to malaria considerably alters the newborn's innate immune response (i.e. its first line of defence), particularly when the placenta has been infected, according to a study led by ISGlobal, the Clinical Research Unit of Nanoro (CRUN) and the Institute of Tropical Medicine Antwerp (ITM). The results, published in BMC Medicine, could help explain why some babies are more susceptible to malaria than others during their first year of life. (2018-11-01)

Stress linked to more advanced disease in some leukemia patients
Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who feel more stress also have more cancer cells in their blood and elevated levels of three other markers of more advanced disease. (2018-09-11)

Revealed a mechanism of beta-cells involved in the development of type-1 diabetes
Researchers reveal how beta cells in the pancreas respond to an inflammatory environment and how this response is implicated in the risk of developing Type 1 diabetes. (2019-11-06)

Revving up innate control of viral infection requires a three-cell ignition
The innate NK-cell response requires a rather carefully choreographed interaction of three cell types. (2018-07-05)

The irresistible CCL17
The chemotactic protein CCL17 attracts immune cells to where they are currently needed. Doctors have long known: A high level of this substance in the body indicates an allergic reaction. A team of scientists led by the University of Bonn has now discovered a completely new function: CCL17 also influences signal transmission in the brain. There may even be a molecular link to autism. The results have now been published in the journal Glia. (2018-09-13)

New biomarkers of inflammation identified as risk of polyneuropathy
Polyneuropathy is one of the most common complications in people with diabetes. First symptoms are often pins-and-needles sensations in the feet. Although polyneuropathy is present in about 30 percent of people with diabetes, it often remains undiagnosed. Scientists from the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), have now been able to show for the first time that six biomarkers of inflammation indicate the risk of polyneuropathy. (2018-08-23)

New findings could lead to improved vaccinations against sexually transmitted infections
In a study published today in the Nature Communications, researchers from King's College London have shown how skin vaccination can generate protective CD8 T-cells that are recruited to the genital tissues and could be used as a vaccination strategy for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). (2019-05-17)

Tummy troubles -- gastrin key in bacterial-induced stomach cancer
Current research suggests that levels of gastrin play a key role in the development of Helicobacter-induced stomach cancer. The related report by Takaishi et al., (2009-06-24)

Cell's recycling team helps sound alarm on pathogens
Autophagy recycles materials in the cell and is also an efficient method of eliminating viruses, bacteria, and parasites. However, for fungal invaders, Duke researchers have found that the cleanup crew takes a less straightforward approach. Rather than killing fungal invaders directly, autophagy is used to chew up a molecule that would otherwise hold back the immune response. It's sort of like breaking the glass on an alarm to allow the button to be pushed. (2015-01-22)

Patchy distribution of joint inflammation resolved
Chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondylo-arthritis (SpA) are chronic disabling diseases that have a poor outcome on loco-motoric function, if left untreated. RA en SpA affect each about 1 percent of the population. The reason why certain joints are more affected than others has been a longstanding question, resolved by Isabelle Cambré and Prof. Dirk Elewaut from the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research who published their results in Nature Communications (2018-11-15)

Doxorubicin disrupts the immune system to cause heart toxicity
Doxorubicin is a chemotherapy drug used in ovarian, bladder, lung, thyroid and stomach cancers, but it carries a harmful side effect. The drug causes a dose-dependent heart toxicity that can lead to congestive heart failure. Researchers have found an important contributor to that heart pathology -- disruption of the metabolism that controls immune responses in the spleen and heart. This dysregulated immunometabolism impairs resolution of inflammation, and chronic, non-resolving inflammation leads to advanced heart failure. (2018-08-06)

Gene signature helps predict breast cancer prognosis
Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers have uncovered a gene signature that may help predict clinical outcomes in certain types of breast cancer. In the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Harold (Hal) Moses, M.D., and colleagues report that this gene signature -- which is associated with the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway -- correlates with reduced relapse-free survival in patients with breast cancer, especially in those with estrogen receptor (ER) positive tumors. (2009-05-19)

Genetic variation increases HIV risk in Africans
A genetic variation which evolved to protect people of African descent against malaria has now been shown to increase their susceptibility to HIV infection by up to 40 percent, according to new research. Conversely, the same variation also appears to prolong survival of those infected with HIV by approximately two years. (2008-07-16)

A study points to new therapeutic targets for tumors associated with chronic inflammation
Scientists headed by ICREA researcher Angel R. Nebreda at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) report a new mechanism that contributes to the development of inflammation-associated colon cancer and points to new therapeutic targets. The study has been published in the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine. (2018-07-11)

New study provides insight into blood signatures of inflammation
A new study from Boston University Schools of Medicine (BUSM) and Public Health (BUSPH) identifies a pattern of inflammation associated with cardio-metabolic risks among participants in the Black Women's Health Study, as well as two independent groups of vulnerable women. These findings could help underserved patients benefit from precision medicine and personalized profiles of disease risk. (2018-05-08)

Brain fights West Nile Virus in unexpected way
A biochemical self-destruct trigger found in many types of cells takes on a different role in brain cells infected with West Nile virus. In a turnabout, it guards the lives of these cells and calls up the body's defenses. Neurons might be protected by this otherwise self-demise mechanism because they are non-renewable and too important to kill off. (2017-05-18)

Combatting brain infections in special issue of Viral Immunology
A special issue of Viral Immunology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, contains a rich collection of the latest research and reviews focusing on Viral Neuroimmunology and the intricacies of viral brain infection. (2019-01-16)

Live probiotics can re-balance the gut microbiome and modify immune system response
New research published in the International Journal of Pharmaceutics demonstrates that 'good' bacteria in the live probiotic SymproveTM can successfully reach and colonise the gut, where they go on to change the existing gut flora. They are also capable of modifying immune response. (2018-11-20)

Microcapsules for targeted drug delivery to cancer cells
A team of scientists from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University together with their colleagues developed a method of targeted drug delivery to cancer cells. The discovery is based on the use of mesenchymal stem cells and microcapsules made of polymeric compounds. The results were published in the Biomaterials Science journal. In the future the discovery may secure more precise treatment of tumors without causing damage to healthy tissues. (2019-12-09)

New whole blood assay may help overcome roadblocks to TB eradication
One of the roadblocks to the eradication of tuberculosis (TB) is the difficulty in identifying patients with latent TB infections (LTBI). Neither the tuberculin skin test (TST) nor interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) are capable of distinguishing active from latent infection or predicting the chance of reactivation. A new multiple-target, real-time reverse transcription-PCR (real-time RT-PCR) TaqMan assay targeting eight human immune markers can differentiate active pulmonary TB from LTBI, according to a study in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics. (2015-01-06)

Texas Biomed researchers pinpoint why HIV patients are more likely to develop tuberculosis
Tuberculosis and HIV -- two of the world's deadliest infectious diseases -- are far worse when they occur together. Now, Texas Biomedical Research Institute researchers have pinpointed an important mechanism at work in this troubling health problem. And, their discovery could lead to a new mode of treatment for people at risk. The results were published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, a top-tier venue for critical advances in biomedical research. (2019-09-12)

New technique reduces tobacco smoke damage to lungs in mice
Researchers in Australia have demonstrated that blocking a certain protein can reduce or prevent cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation in mice. Inflammation underlies the disease process of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and many other smoking-related ailments. (2010-03-18)

Scientists discover how neuroactive steroids dampen inflammatory signaling in cells
For the first time, scientists discovered how neuroactive steroids naturally found in the brain and bloodstream inhibit the activity of a specific kind of protein called Toll-like receptors (TLR4), which have been known to play a role in inflammation in many organs, including the brain. (2019-02-13)

Different bacteria use same cell surface molecule to invade tissue and promote infection
A new study identifies a single molecule as a key entry point used by two types of dangerous bacteria to break through cellular barriers and cause disease. The findings, published March 19 in the journal mBio, suggest that blocking the interaction between the molecule, known as CD40, and bacteria may represent a universal strategy for preventing life-threatening illnesses, including toxic shock syndrome. (2019-03-19)

UC Riverside scientists discover wound-healing substance
New research with chickens at the University of California, Riverside has identified a protein pivotal in healing the animals' injuries. The discovery may help researchers understand how wound-healing can be accelerated in humans. (2002-01-23)

Novel role for spleen B cells in inflammatory response to bacterial toxins
University of Tsukuba-led researchers have identified a new role for marginal zone B lymphocytes in enhancing inflammatory responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Marginal zone B cells were shown to produce pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 in response to lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Interleukin-6 production requires TLR4 signaling in relation to the antibody receptor Fcα/μR. These findings broaden understanding of marginal zone B cell function and interleukin-6 signaling in the immune system, which could be exploited to treat sepsis. (2016-05-09)

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