Popular Chernobyl News and Current Events

Popular Chernobyl News and Current Events, Chernobyl News Articles.
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OUP publishes free article collection about Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster
March 11, 2016, marks five years since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster. In the last five years, researchers all over the world have been conducting substantial studies to find out the effect on the environment, human bodies, and our society. In honor of their great work, Oxford University Press has made 30 research articles about the accident from nine journals freely available to read online for a year. (2016-03-09)

Breaking up amino acids with radiation
A new experimental and theoretical study published in EPJ D has shown how the ions formed when electrons collide with one amino acid, glutamine, differ according to the energy of the colliding electrons. This has implications for improving radiotherapy for cancer and understanding the origin of life. (2020-02-05)

Ukrainian villages still suffering legacy of Chernobyl more than 30 years on
Milk in parts of Ukraine has radioactivity levels up to five times over the country's official safe limit, new research shows. (2018-06-08)

Researchers discover atomic bomb effect results in adult-onset thyroid cancer
Radiation from the atomic bomb blasts in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, in 1945, likely rearranged chromosomes in some survivors who later developed papillary thyroid cancer as adults, according to Japanese researchers. (2008-08-29)

How did the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident impact thyroid cancer risk?
New lessons are being learned about risk assessment and predicting the extent of thyroid cancer occurrence following radiation exposure due to a nuclear power plant accident such as the one in March 2011 in Fukushima Prefecture of Japan. (2017-12-21)

Leaders in Healthcare
Join aspiring leaders to address some of the biggest issues facing healthcare leadership and management in the UK, affecting the professional workforce as well as the population. (2016-10-19)

Radiation causes blindness in wild animals in Chernobyl
This year marks 30 years since the Chernobyl nuclear accident. Vast amounts of radioactive particles spread over large areas in Europe. (2016-02-10)

Mailman School PH study finds increase in thyroid diseases risk from exposure at Chernobyl
Persons exposed to radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident as children and adolescents have an increased risk of follicular adenoma or benign tumor of the thyroid gland, according to a Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health study. Results further suggest that age at exposure, history of thyroid diseases and location of residence do not modify its risk. (2008-02-19)

Amid terror threats, new hope for radiation antidote
Researchers have identified promising drugs that could lead to the first antidote for radiation exposure that might result from a dirty bomb terror attack or a nuclear accident such as Chernobyl. (2016-05-31)

Zn-InsP6 complex can enhance excretion of radioactive strontium from the body
Researchers at Kanazawa University have found a new phenomenon that a complex of myo-inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) with zinc enhances excretion of radioactive strontium from the body. (2018-06-01)

New theory rewrites opening moments of Chernobyl disaster
A brand-new theory of the opening moments during the Chernobyl disaster, the most severe nuclear accident in history, based on additional analysis is presented for the first time in the journal Nuclear Technology, an official journal of the American Nuclear Society. (2017-11-17)

Case Western Reserve University researchers track Chernobyl fallout
More than 20 years later, researchers from Case Western Reserve University traveled to Sweden and Poland to gain insight into the downward migration of Chernobyl-derived radionuclides in the soil. Among the team's findings was the fact that much more plutonium was found in the Swedish soil at a depth that corresponded with the nuclear explosion than that of Poland. (2008-10-01)

Homes should not be abandoned after a big nuclear accident
New research suggests that few people, if any, should be asked to leave their homes after a big nuclear accident, which is what happened in March 2011 following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. (2017-11-19)

Prolonged exposure to low-dose radiation may increase the risk of hypertension, a known cause of heart disease and stroke
A long-term study of Russian nuclear plant workers suggests that prolonged low-dose radiation exposure increases the risk of hypertension. This study is the first to associate an increased risk of hypertension to low doses of ionizing radiation among a large group of workers who were chronically exposed over many years. The higher the cumulative dose of radiation, the greater the risk, the study showed. (2019-05-03)

Nuclear reactors with a newly proposed barrier could've withstood Chernobyl and Fukushima
To regain public confidence in nuclear power -- a sustainable source of renewable energy, as well as bridging the gap between what we know today and what is going on in practice, scientists propose a new safety barrier to be implemented in large reactors around the world. The new barrier, described in the open-access journal Nuclear Energy and Technology, could reduce the probability of core melt to that of a large meteorite hitting the site. (2019-11-26)

Nurses sleep less before a scheduled shift, hindering patient care and safety
Nurses sleep nearly an hour and a half less before work days compared to days off, which hurts patient care and safety, finds a new study by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. The findings are published in Sleep Health, the journal of the National Sleep Foundation. (2019-12-12)

Study reveals wildlife is abundant in Chernobyl
A scavenger study that used fish carcasses as bait provides additional evidence that wildlife is abundant in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. (2019-01-31)

Radiation in parts of Marshall Islands is higher than Chernobyl
Radiation levels in parts of the Marshall Islands in the central Pacific Ocean, where the United States conducted nearly 70 nuclear tests during the Cold War, are still alarmingly high. Columbia University researchers tested soil samples on four uninhabited isles and discovered that they contained concentrations of nuclear isotopes that are significantly higher than those found near Chernobyl and Fukushima. (2019-07-17)

EARTH: Amber-encased specimen could be oldest known grass
The evolutionary age of grass has been hotly contested. Scientists have previously dated the earliest grasses to 55 million years ago; after the dinosaurs went extinct. Now, a new 100-million-year-old specimen of amber from Myanmar potentially pushes back grass evolution to the Late Cretaceous. (2015-05-14)

The Lancet Oncology (TLO) and The Lancet Infectious Diseases (TLID)
The first review in this month's TLO reviews the epidemiological evidence linking cancer incidence as a result of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear explosion in the Ukraine. (2002-05-01)

Microrobots clean up radioactive waste (video)
According to some experts, nuclear power holds great promise for meeting the world's growing energy demands without generating greenhouse gases. But scientists need to find a way to remove radioactive isotopes, both from wastewater generated by nuclear power plants and from the environment in case of a spill. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed tiny, self-propelled robots that remove radioactive uranium from simulated wastewater. (2019-10-30)

Sleep research uncovers dire consequences to deprivation
Researchers at Michigan State University conducted the largest experimentally controlled study on sleep deprivation to date, revealing just how detrimental operating without sleep can be in everything from bakers adding too much salt to cookies to surgeons botching surgeries. (2018-10-02)

Melanin's 'trick' for maintaining radioprotection studied
Research at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory, in collaboration with the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, has provided insights into the electrochemical mechanism that gives the complex polymer known as melanin its long-term ability to protect some species from ionizing radiation, with a goal of using that knowledge to develop materials that mimic those natural properties. (2011-08-23)

Viewing Fukushima in the cold light of Chernobyl
Three research papers on Chernobyl bring a new focus on just how extensive the long-term effects of the Fukushim Daiichi nuclear disaster might be on Japanese wildlife. (2013-08-21)

Bumblebees exposed to Chernobyl-levels of radiation consume more nectar
Researchers at Stirling University have found that exposure to chronic low-dose radiation, found in the Chernobyl exclusion zone, negatively affects bumblebee energy use by increasing their metabolic rate and food consumption. The preliminary results will be presented on Dec. 12, at the British Ecological Society Annual Meeting in Belfast. (2019-12-11)

The pros and cons of radiotherapy: Will it work for you?
Women undergoing radiotherapy for many cancers are more likely than men to be cured, but the side effects are more brutal, according to one of Australia's most experienced radiation oncology medical physicists. (2020-03-29)

Plant as superhero during nuclear power plant accidents
A collaborative study by a group of scientists from Iwate University, The University of Tokyo and Shimane University, Japan demonstrated for the first time that two ATP binding cassette proteins ABCG33 and ABCG37 function as potassium-independent cesium uptake carriers. (2021-02-16)

Crops near Chernobyl still contaminated
Crops grown near Chernobyl are still contaminated due to the 1986 nuclear accident, new research shows. (2020-12-17)

30 years after Chernobyl, UGA camera study reveals wildlife abundance in CEZ
While humans are now scarce in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, continued studies--including a just-published camera study conducted by researchers from the University of Georgia's Savannah River Ecology Laboratory--validate findings that wildlife populations are abundant at the site. The camera study, published in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment and led by UGA's James Beasley, is the first remote-camera scent-station survey conducted within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, or CEZ. (2016-04-18)

What exactly happened at Chernobyl? (video)
On April 26, 1986 the Soviet Union's Chernobyl Power Complex nuclear reactor 4 exploded. This week on Reactions, we talk about the chemistry behind this catastrophic event: https://youtu.be/uvpS2lUHZD8. (2019-08-16)

Proposed Biomass-Fired Power Plant Will Create Electricity While Clearing Contamination in Belarus
Researchers plan to test a way to decontaminate Belarus forests contaminated 10 years ago by the nuclear accident at Chernobyl. In the plan announced by Sandia National Laboratories, contaminated wood would be burned in a pilot biomass power plant to create electricity and capture radionuclides in the ash (1996-10-17)

Screening truffles for radioactivity 30 years from Chernobyl
Some forest mushrooms, such as wild porcini, can accumulate dangerous levels of radioactivity from the soils they grow in. But until now it was unclear if the same was true for truffles, fungi that range among the most expensive foods in the world. Researchers have analyzed Burgundy truffles collected in central Europe and found they contain only negligible amounts of radioactive cesium, being safe for consumption. The results are published Feb. 25 in Biogeosciences. (2016-02-25)

Chernobyl Animals Highly Contaminated But Undeformed
Wildlife near Chernobyl, site of the world's worst nuclear disaster, not only survives, it abounds in the area, now largely abandoned by humans. University of Georgia researchers have found genetic changes but no deformities in several species of fish and rodents examined near Chernobyl in eight expeditions to the area since 1991. (1997-09-12)

Rebalancing the nuclear debate through education
Better physics teaching with a particular emphasis on radioactivity and radiation science could improve public awareness through education of the environmental benefits and relative safety of nuclear power generation, according to leading Brazilian scientist Heldio Villar. He suggests that it might then be possible to have a less emotional debate about the future of the industry that will ultimately reduce our reliance on fossil fuels. (2011-09-09)

New map for radioactive soil contamination in Western Europe
An international consortium of scientists has refined the map of caesium and plutonium radionuclide concentrations in soils in Switzerland and several neighbouring countries. Using an archive of European soil samples, the team led by Katrin Meusburger from the University of Basel, now at the WSL research institute, was able to trace the sources of radioactive fallout between 1960 and 2009. This study was published in Scientific Reports. (2020-07-16)

Cincinnati study of Chernobyl residents uncovers new cause of thyroid cancer
Yuri E. Nukiforov led a team of researchers from both Cincinnati University and the University of Munich in identifying a novel oncogene (a mutated and/or overproduced version of a normal gene that alone or together with other changes can convert a cell into a tumor cell) in papillary thyroid carcinomas that developed in patients exposed to radiation at Chernobyl. Their results are published in the January 3 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2005-01-03)

A capsule for removing radioactive contamination from milk, fruit juices, other beverages
Amid concerns about possible terrorist attacks with nuclear materials, and fresh memories of environmental contamination from the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan, scientists today at the 243rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society described development of a capsule that can be dropped into water, milk, fruit juices and other foods to remove more than a dozen radioactive substances. (2012-03-27)

For disaster debris arriving from Japan, radiation least of the concerns
Later this year debris from the earthquake and tsunami that devastated Japan should begin to wash up on US shores -- and one question many have asked is whether that will pose a radiation risk. The simple answer is, no. (2012-02-22)

New-generation material removes iodine from water
Material developed at Dartmouth College scrubs iodine from water for the first time and could hold the key to cleaning nuclear accidents. (2017-06-07)

Radionuclide levels in freshwater fish differ between lakes and rivers
After the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, managing environmental radionuclide contamination efficiently has become incredibly important. In light of this, a team of scientists from Miharu, Japan, have provided insights that could potentially lead to more accurate environmental risk management in the future. They have shown that the factors affecting contamination of freshwater fish differ between lakes and rivers. (2020-03-02)

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