Popular Childcare News and Current Events

Popular Childcare News and Current Events, Childcare News Articles.
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Study finds language, achievement benefits of universal early childhood education
A study of more than 60,000 children enrolled in Norway's universal early education system has found the program improves language skills and narrows achievement gaps, according to a team of researchers from the US and Norway, led by Boston College Professor of Education Eric Dearing. (2018-02-22)

Which strategies help cut consumption of sugary beverages in young children?
An Obesity Reviews analysis of published studies reveals strategies that can successfully reduce the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages in young children. (2018-07-18)

Scientists penalized by motherhood
Despite gender balance at lower levels of academia, challenges still exist for women progressing to more senior roles. This research challenges to what extent a motherhood penalty could be at play. (2018-03-29)

Children living in countryside outperform children living in metropolitan area in motor skills
Residential density is related to children's motor skills, engagement in outdoor play and organised sports. that Finnish children living in the countryside spent more time outdoors and had better motor skills than their age peers in the metropolitan area. On the other hand, children living in the metropolitan area participated the most in organised sports. (2019-06-27)

China's two-child policy may exacerbate gender inequality
Since China ended its one-child policy allowing all families to have up to two children, an additional 90 million women have become eligible to have a second child. But new UBC sociology research suggests the new universal two-child policy could be negatively affecting women's status and gender equality. (2018-02-23)

Stress main cause of smoking after childbirth
Mothers who quit smoking in pregnancy are more likely to light up again after their baby is born if they feel stressed. Researchers studied more than 1,000 new mothers and found that the stress of caring for a newborn, sleepless nights, social pressure, and the idea that they no longer need to protect the baby -- all contribute to relapse. They also found that women who felt they were being supported by a partner were less likely to start smoking again. (2015-09-09)

Dartmouth economist outlines reforms to improve access to affordable, high quality child care
For families in the US, the costs of high-quality child care are exorbitant, especially for those with children under age five. A new policy proposal, 'Public Investments in Child Care,' by Dartmouth Associate Professor of Economics Elizabeth Cascio, finds that current federal child care tax policies are not benefiting the families most burdened by child care costs. Therefore, Cascio outlines a new policy that could replace the current federal child care tax policies. (2017-10-22)

The Lancet Public Health: US modelling study estimates impact of school closures for COVID-19 on US health-care workforce and associated mortality
US policymakers considering physical distancing measures to slow the spread of COVID-19 face a difficult trade-off between closing schools to reduce transmission and new cases, and potential health-care worker absenteeism due to additional childcare needs that could ultimately increase mortality from COVID-19, according to new modelling research published in The Lancet Public Health journal. (2020-04-03)

Parents have more conflicts with their in-laws than do childless couples
Intergenerational relations include various forms of help and support but also tensions and conflicts. Although relations with in-laws are the subject of many anecdotes and proverbs across cultures, they remain little studied in contemporary societies. A new study investigates how being a parent is associated with conflicts between family generations. The research is part of the Generational Transfers in Finland -- a research project lead by Professor Anna Rotkirch and funded by the Academy of Finland. (2017-08-04)

Infant death study reveals dangerous sleep practices among babysitters, relatives, others
Babies who died during their sleep while being watched by someone other than parents often had been placed in unsafe sleep positions, such as on their stomachs, or in unsafe locations, such as a couch, a new study has found. (2018-04-02)

One in 4 parents not prepared for 'parenting hangovers' this holiday season
A quarter of parents of young children who drink alcohol on special occasions do not think about limiting how much they drink or whether they'll be able to take care of their child the next day, according to a new national poll. (2018-12-17)

Why the institution of fatherhood is taking so long to change
Men in blue-collar occupations tend to spend limited time with their children, leaving childrearing almost entirely to the child's mother, according to researchers at the Higher School of Economics (HSE University). (2018-02-28)

Telemedicine could eradicate many expensive ED visits
A community-wide study in upstate New York found that nearly 28 percent of all visits to the pediatric emergency department could have been replaced with a more cost-effective Internet doctor's (2008-05-06)

For children with respiratory infections, antibiotics with narrower targets are better
When doctors prescribe antibiotics for children with common respiratory infections, a more selective approach is better. A study of 30,000 children with earaches, strep throat and other common infections found that narrow-spectrum antibiotics, which act against a smaller range of bacteria, had fewer adverse effects than broad-spectrum antibiotics, which target a broader variety of bacteria. For both practical and clinical outcomes, narrow-spectrum antibiotics performed equally well or better than broad-spectrum ones, with fewer disruptions to family routines. (2018-01-30)

Prescription painkillers source of addiction for most women
Reseach shows that more than half of women and a third of men reported doctor-prescribed painkillers as their first contact with opioid drugs, a family of drugs which include prescription medicines such OxyContin and codeine, as well as illicit drugs such as heroin. (2015-11-09)

Are parents doing enough to prepare 'substitute' babysitters over the holidays?
Parents may underestimate the importance of preparing new sitters for common scenarios like injuries or more serious emergencies. (2017-12-18)

Dads are often having fun while moms work around the house
For the first time, researchers have evidence of exactly what dads are doing while moms are taking care of housework or tending to their child. The results will be disappointing for those who expected more gender equity in modern society. (2017-10-09)

MN childcare programs focused on nutrition and physical activities, study finds
Existing state and local programs focused on good nutrition and physical activities for children have led to measurable improvement in practices by the state's child care programs between 2010 and 2016, says a new University of Minnesota Medical School study. (2018-05-16)

The key to happiness: Friends or family?
Think spending time with your kids and spouse is the key to your happiness? You may actually be happier getting together with your friends, a new SMU study finds. (2020-09-17)

Call for unis and others to consider women juggling research/childcare
Offering financial aid to cover childcare costs for female academics attending conferences is one of the suggestions offered by QUT researchers who surveyed Australian women on how caring for children has affected their careers. They also recommend institutions and funding bodies that use publication and citation benchmarks as a key criteria for appointment, promotion and the awarding of grants should adjust those to cater for women who have cared for children. (2019-03-29)

Mother nature and child development
A world first review of the importance of nature play could transform children's play spaces, supporting investment in city and urban parks, while also delivering important opportunities for children's physical, social and emotional development. (2020-02-14)

Over half of UK female surgeons have experience of workplace discrimination, poll suggests
More than half of female surgeons in the UK have faced or witnessed discrimination in the workplace, suggest the results of a confidential online poll, published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2019-01-07)

Parents' perceptions of their child's competence linked to physical activity
According to a new study, there is no direct link between parents' own level of physical activity, and how much their child may exercise. In fact, parents' perceptions of their children's athleticism are what have a direct impact on the children's activity. (2010-01-26)

Mother's attitude to baby during pregnancy may have implications for child's development
Mothers who 'connect' with their baby during pregnancy are more likely to interact in a more positive way with their infant after it is born, according to a study carried out at the University of Cambridge. Interaction is important for helping infants learn and develop. (2018-06-12)

Offering children a variety of vegetables increases acceptance
Although food preferences are largely learned, dislike is the main reason parents stop offering or serving their children foods like vegetables. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, demonstrated that repeatedly offering a variety of vegetables increased acceptance and consumption by children. (2019-09-09)

Obesity prevention interventions needed beyond preschool
A Rutgers study has found a need for early childhood obesity prevention interventions beyond preschool education settings. (2019-01-30)

New guidelines say breastfeeding is safe after anaesthesia
New guidelines published by the Association of Anaesthetists in the journal Anaesthesia, to coincide with the start of World Breast Feeding Week (1-7 August) say that breastfeeding is safe after the mother has had anaesthesia, as soon as she is alert and able to feed. (2020-07-31)

New method maps chemicals in the skin
A new method of examining the skin can reduce the number of animal experiments while providing new opportunities to develop pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. Chemical imaging allows all layers of the skin to be seen and the presence of virtually any substance in any part of the skin to be measured with a very high degree of precision. (2017-11-29)

Equal earnings help couples say 'I do' and stay together
Recent work by Patrick Ishizuka, a postdoctoral fellow at Cornell University's Cornell Population Center, is the first to offer empirical evidence that cohabitating couples are likely to get married only when they earn as much as their married peers. (2018-04-12)

Touch biographies reveal transgenerational nature of touch
The way we feel about being touched -- and the way we touch others -- are shaped by our personal and generational affective history. Touch inequalities, too, are often transmitted through generations, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Tampere shows. For the study, the researchers analysed a unique set of data, namely touch biographies. (2019-02-06)

Acupuncture may alleviate babies' excessive crying (infantile colic)
Acupuncture may be an effective treatment option for babies with infantile colic -- those who cry for more than three hours a day on three or more days of the week -- reveals research published online in Acupuncture in Medicine. (2017-01-16)

Parents of children with cancer have additional worries during COVID
The COVID-19 pandemic has heaped additional financial strains, childcare complications and other problems on already-burdened caregivers of children diagnosed with cancer, according to a study from researchers at Duke Health and other institutions. (2021-02-22)

Female researchers publish childcare recommendations for conference organizers
Many women in science are raising concerns over the fact that parents with young children are often excluded from fully participating in academic conference activities. (2018-03-12)

Endometriosis may be costing us much more than previously thought
Along with significant physical pain, endometriosis also hurts Australian women at the hip pocket, as well as having significant economic effects on society as a whole, a new study published today in PLOS ONE confirms. (2019-10-10)

How the American child welfare system lost its way
Black children are removed from their families at much greater rates than any other race or ethnicity in this country. At the same time the sheer number of all child abuse investigations in the US is staggering: experts estimate that by age 18 one out of three children has been the subject of a child protective services investigation. Yet, many of these investigations and removals are unjustified, says University of Rochester health policy historian and physician Mical Raz. (2020-12-22)

How Human Population came from our ability to cooperate
Humans' ability to cooperate during child-bearing years by sharing food, labor, and childcare duties is the story of population growth. (2019-11-06)

Stress was leading reason teachers quit before pandemic, and COVID has made matters worse
Stress was the most common reason teachers cited for leaving the profession before and during the pandemic, according to a RAND Corporation survey of nearly 1,000 former public-school teachers. Three of four former teachers said work was often or always stressful in the most recent year in which they taught in a public school. Teachers cited stress nearly twice as often as insufficient pay as a reason for quitting. (2021-02-22)

The glass ceiling: Three reasons why it still exists and is hurting the economy
New research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business finds the glass ceiling -- that invisible barrier to advancement that women face at the top levels of the workplace -- remains as intractable as ever and is a drag on the economy. (2018-08-22)

Many young people don't know when female and male fertility declines, study finds
Most students underestimate the impact of female and male age on fertility, new research published in Human Fertility finds. Less than half could correctly identify the age when a woman's fertility declines and even fewer knew when male fertility declines. (2018-07-30)

Scientists take action to prevent sexual harassment and bias
In a policy paper published in the journal Science, scientists from a variety of fields highlight key ways institutions and funding agencies can help address sexual harassment and gender bias in the STEM workplace. (2019-11-07)

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