Popular Childhood Obesity News and Current Events | Page 3

Popular Childhood Obesity News and Current Events, Childhood Obesity News Articles.
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Smoking around your toddler could be just as bad as smoking while pregnant
Children whose parents smoked when they were toddlers are likely to have a wider waist and a higher BMI by time they reach ten years of age, reveal researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte Justine Research Centre. (2015-06-21)

Study shows early family and community support are essential to children's academic success
Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with poor outcomes in adults. The impact of ACEs on school performance and factors that may be protective are not well studied. The objective of this study was to determine if there was an association of ACEs and protective familial and community factors with school performance and attitudes in children ages 6-17. (2018-05-05)

Dangers of commonly prescribed painkillers highlighted in study
Commonly prescribed painkillers need to be given for shorter periods of time to reduce the risk of obesity and sleep deprivation, a new study has revealed. (2017-12-06)

Brain's 'sixth sense' for calories discovered
The brain can sense the calories in food, independent of the taste mechanism, researchers have found in studies with mice. Their finding that the brain's reward system is switched on by this (2008-03-26)

Lack of guidance may delay a child's first trip to the dentist
Without a doctor or dentist's guidance, some parents don't follow national recommendations for early dental care for their children, a new national poll finds. (2018-02-19)

Early puberty linked with increased risk of obesity for women
Girls who start puberty earlier are more likely to be overweight as adults, finds new research from Imperial College London. (2018-03-15)

Obesity linked with higher chance of developing rapid, irregular heart rate
People with obesity are more likely to develop a rapid and irregular heart rate, called atrial fibrillation, which can lead to stroke, heart failure and other complications, according to Penn State researchers. They found that people with obesity had a 40 percent higher chance of developing atrial fibrillation than people without obesity. (2018-04-18)

Healthy weight gain in infants
With nearly 10 percent of infants considered 'high weight for length,' University of Delaware researcher Jillian Trabulsi wants to help babies achieve a healthy weight starting with their first months of life. At the fourth International Conference on Nutrition and Growth in Amsterdam, she and colleague Julie Mennella presented preliminary findings about babies on a cow's milk formula, who had accelerated weight gain, compared to babies fed a hydrolyzed protein formula, who had weight gain similar to breastfed infants. (2017-03-20)

Why you feel hungrier after you lose weight
Blame it on hormones: one hunger hormone continues to be elevated after you lose weight, making you feel hungry even though your new, slanker body has had enough to eat. (2018-02-08)

C-sections and gut bacteria increase risk of childhood obesity
New CHILD Study research has found that overweight and obese women are more like to have children who are overweight or obese by three years of age--and that bacteria in the gut may be partially to blame. (2018-02-22)

Should obesity be recognized as a disease?
With obesity now affecting almost a third (29%) of the population in England, and expected to rise to 35% by 2030, should we now recognize it as a disease? Experts debate the issue in The BMJ today. (2019-07-17)

Obesity Day to highlight growing obesity epidemic in Europe
The growing obesity epidemic, which is predicted to affect more than half of all European citizens by 2030, will be the focus of European Obesity Day to be held on May 21. According to World Health Organisation, obesity is one of the greatest public health challenges of the 21st century. Its prevalence has tripled in many countries of the WHO European Region since the 1980s. (2016-03-24)

Increases in obesity, severe obesity continue among adults in US
Obesity and severe obesity continued to grow among adults in the United States between 2007-2008 and 2015-2016 but there were no significant overall changes among youth. (2018-03-23)

Wearable devices and mobile health technology: one step towards better health
With increasing efforts being made to address the current global obesity epidemic, wearable devices and mobile health ('mHealth') technology have emerged as promising tools for promoting physical activity. However, current literature seems to indicate that these new technologies may serve best as part of a larger overall health plan, rather than working alone to encourage weight loss. (2018-08-13)

Exposure to air pollution during pregnancy may increase blood pressure in early life
Researchers study the impact on childhood blood pressure of pre- and post-natal exposure to environmental factors such as pollution, noise, and a dense built environment. (2020-11-12)

Obesity drives US health care costs up by 29 percent, varies by state
Recent research by John Cawley, professor of policy analysis and management at Cornell University, provides new insights on how individual states are affected by the health care costs of obesity. (2018-02-08)

Two in 5 individuals with schizophrenia have attempted suicide
A new study by the University of Toronto (U of T), released today, found that those with schizophrenia who'd been physically abused during childhood were five times more likely to have attempted suicide. The lifetime prevalence of suicide attempts among individuals with schizophrenia was 39.2 percent compared to 2.8 percent of those without the disorder, according to the study. (2016-02-10)

Association of childhood lead exposure with adult personality traits, mental health
Millions of adults now entering middle age were exposed to high levels of lead as children, with childhood lead exposure linked to lower IQ, greater rates of child behavior problems, hyperactivity and antisocial behavior. This study included nearly 600 children in New Zealand who had their blood lead levels measured at age 11 and their mental health assessed periodically through age 38. (2019-01-23)

Obesity increases incidence, severity, costs of knee dislocations
A new national study finds that the obesity epidemic is resulting in a higher risk of knee dislocations as well as serious vascular injuries and higher treatment costs. (2017-11-03)

Three in 4 don't know obesity causes cancer
Three out of four (75 percent) people in the UK are unaware of the link between obesity and cancer, according to a new Cancer Research UK report published today. (2016-09-08)

Kids with obese friends and family more likely to misperceive weight
Kids and teens surrounded by overweight peers or parents are more likely to be oblivious to their own extra pounds than kids from thin entourages, according to a new Canadian study. (2008-09-17)

Metagenomics of early childhood oral health and early childhood caries
At the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Kimon Divaris, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, the AADR representative to the IADR/AADR Publications Committee, presented a poster titled 'Metagenomics of Early Childhood Oral Health and Early Childhood Caries.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., USA from March 21-24, 2018. (2018-03-22)

Health Benefits Of Fitness
Cardiorespiratory fitness and body fatness were measured by treadmill in 21,925 men aged 30-83, of whom 428 died over 8 year followup. All cause mortality risk was correlated with poor fitness irrespective of body fatness. Thus, fitness is more important than leanness and may reduce obesity risk. (1999-03-01)

A fat-regulating enzyme could hold the key to obesity, diabetes, cancer, other diseases
It had already been known that the enzyme known as phosphatidic acid phosphatase plays a crucial role in regulating the amount of fat in the human body. Controlling it is therefore of interest in the fight against obesity. But scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick have now found that getting rid of the enzyme entirely can increase the risk of cancer, inflammation and other ills. Their findings were published online in the Journal of Biological Chemistry last month. (2017-09-18)

In BRCA mutation carriers, obesity is linked with increased DNA damage
Being obese or having a higher body mass index (BMI) while carrying a BRCA (BReast CAncer gene) mutation is positively linked with higher levels of damage to the DNA in normal breast gland cells, new research suggests. The results of the study will be presented Sunday, March 18, at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill. (2018-03-18)

Combating childhood obesity by preventing 'fatty liver' in fetus
New research published in The Journal of Physiology indicates that an obese pregnant mother and exposure to a high fat, high sugar diet during pregnancy produces a 'fatty liver' in the fetus, potentially predisposing children to obesity, metabolic and cardiovascular disorders later in life. (2018-03-07)

Risk factors for prostate cancer
New research suggests that age, race and family history are the biggest risk factors for a man to develop prostate cancer, although high blood pressure, high cholesterol, vitamin D deficiency, inflammation of prostate, and vasectomy also add to the risk. In contrast, obesity, alcohol abuse, and smoking show a negative association with the disease. Details are reported in the International Journal of Medical Engineering and Informatics. (2015-09-29)

Obese mice lose anxiety when 'zombie cells' exit their brain
Mayo Clinic researchers and collaborators have shown in mice that obesity increases the level of 'zombie' or senescent cells in the brain, and that those cells, in turn, are linked to anxiety. When senolytic drugs are used to clear those cells, the anxious behaviors in the mice dissipate. These findings appear in Cell Metabolism. (2019-01-03)

Weight loss medicines underutilized by veterans
Despite the availability of new weight management medications and several clinical guidelines recommending their use as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for obesity, a new study has found that their use is extremely low (about one percent) among eligible Veterans. (2019-05-15)

Baby sleeping in same room associated with less sleep, unsafe sleep habits
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends parents keep babies in the same room with them to sleep for the first year to prevent sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). But room sharing between babies and mothers beyond the first four months is associated with less sleep for babies and unsafe sleeping practices that the AAP is hoping to prevent, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. (2017-06-05)

Obesity may hasten disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritis
Unintentional weight loss also linked with worsening disability, perhaps related to frailty. (2018-04-30)

Study: Exercise mitigates genetic effects of obesity later in life
A new study suggests, for the first time in women over age 70, that working up a sweat can reduce the influence one's genes have on obesity. (2018-06-04)

Exposure to sugary breakfast cereal advertising directly influences children's diets
Laboratory studies have shown that kids will request and prefer brands they have seen recently advertised on TV. A new naturalistic Dartmouth study bridges the gap between lab studies and a real world setting, demonstrating that kids who were exposed to TV ads for high-sugar cereals aired during the programs they watched were more likely to subsequently eat the brands of cereals they had seen advertised. (2019-01-07)

Preschool teachers need better training in science
Preschool instructors appear to lack the knowledge, skills and confidence to effectively teach their young students science -- a problem that is likely contributing to America's poor global performance in this crucially important subject. (2017-09-26)

Parental obesity linked to delays in child development, NIH study suggests
Children of obese parents may be at risk for developmental delays, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. Children of obese mothers were more likely to fail tests of fine motor skill. Children of obese fathers were more likely to fail measures of social competence, and those born to extremely obese couples also were more likely to fail tests of problem solving ability. (2017-01-02)

Lifestyle changes can close regional obesity gap, study finds
Lifestyle differences are to blame for regional variation in obesity rates in Scotland, research from the University of Edinburgh has found. Genetic factors cannot completely explain why obesity is more common in some areas and not others, scientists say. (2017-10-06)

The role of the gut microbiome in posttraumatic stress disorder: More than a gut feeling
The bacteria in your gut could hold clues to whether or not you will develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after experiencing a traumatic event. (2017-10-25)

Study finds experiences of racism associated with weight gain in African American women
A recent analysis conducted by investigators from the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University has found that frequent experiences of racism were associated with a higher risk of obesity among African American women. The findings, which currently appear online in the American Journal of Epidemiology, found the relationship between racism and obesity was strongest among women who reported consistently high experiences of racism over a 12-year period. (2014-03-04)

Childhood aggression linked to deficits in executive function
Researchers find that primary school children with reduced cognitive skills for planning and self-restraint are more likely to show increased aggression in middle childhood. The study examined the relationship between aggression and executive function -- a measure of cognitive skills that allow a person to achieve goals by controlling their behavior. The results suggest that helping children to increase their executive function could reduce their aggression. (2018-03-15)

Protection against Malaria: A matter of balance
A balanced production of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines at two years of age protects against clinical malaria in early childhood, according to a study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by ''la Caixa'' Foundation. The results also indicated that early exposure to the parasite does not affect the risk of developing the disease, although it could affect the parasite-specific immune response later in life. (2018-11-14)

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