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Popular Chimpanzees News and Current Events, Chimpanzees News Articles.
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Genetic opposites attract when chimpanzees choose a mate
Duke University researchers find that chimpanzees are more likely to reproduce with mates whose genetic makeup most differs from their own. (2017-01-11)
NIAID-Supported Scientists Discover Origin Of HIV-1
NIAID-supported scientists report that they have discovered the origin of HIV-1, the virus responsible for the global AIDS pandemic. (1999-01-31)
Chimpanzees learn rock-paper-scissors
Chimpanzees of all ages and all sexes can learn the simple circular relationship between the three different hand signals used in the well-known game rock-paper-scissors. (2017-08-10)
Genome sequencing reveals ancient interbreeding between chimpanzees and bonobos
For the first time, scientists have revealed ancient gene mixing between chimpanzees and bonobos, mankind's closest relatives, showing parallels with Neanderthal mixing in human ancestry. (2016-10-27)
Chimpanzees choose cooperation over competition
Tasks that require chimpanzees to work together preferred five-fold, despite opportunities for competition, aggression and freeloading. (2016-08-22)
Like people, great apes may distinguish between true and false beliefs in others
Great apes help a person access an object when that person thinks they knows where it is but is mistaken, according to a study published April 5, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Buttelmann from Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany, and colleagues. (2017-04-05)
Study: Bonobos may be better representation of last common ancestor with humans
A new study examining the muscular system of bonobos provides firsthand evidence that the rare great ape species may be more closely linked, anatomically, to human ancestors than common chimpanzees. (2017-04-28)
Bonobo and chimpanzee gestures share many meanings
If a bonobo and a chimpanzee were to meet face to face, they could probably understand each other's gestures. (2018-02-27)
Chimpanzees: Travel fosters tool use
Chimpanzees traveling far and for longer time periods use tools more frequently to obtain food. (2016-07-19)
New broad-spectrum antiviral protein can inhibit HIV, other pathogens in some primates
University of Colorado Boulder researchers have discovered that a protein-coding gene called Schlafen11 (SLFN11) may induce a broad-spectrum cellular response against infection by viruses including HIV-1. (2017-01-18)
Brain size of human ancestors evolved gradually over 3 million years
Modern humans have brains that are more than three times larger than our closest living relatives, chimpanzees and bonobos. (2018-02-20)
Wild African ape reactions to novel camera traps
An international team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, analyzed video from remote camera-trap devices placed in ape-populated forests throughout Africa to see how wild apes would react to these unfamiliar objects. (2019-03-14)
Human activity quickly killing cultural diversity of the chimpanzee
The impact human activities have on the cultural behaviors and traditions of our closest relative, the chimpanzee, is drastic, reports a new study -- one based on an unprecedented data set of nearly 150 African chimpanzee communities. (2019-03-07)
Viruses in the genome important for our brain
Over millions of years retroviruses have been incorporated into our human DNA, where they today make up almost 10 per cent of the total genome. (2017-01-12)
Penn study identifies new malaria parasites in wild bonobos
Malaria parasites, although widespread among wild chimpanzees and gorillas, have not been detected in bonobos, a chimp cousin. (2017-11-21)
Can chimpanzee vocalizations reveal the origins of human language?
Fossil primates provide important clues about human evolution, but the sounds they made and the soft tissue involved in making those sounds weren't preserved. (2018-05-08)
Meet three new genes that may have influenced human brain size
Three brain development genes are found only in humans and may have helped drive the rapid expansion of the brain starting roughly three million years ago. (2018-05-31)
Pigeons better at multitasking than humans
Pigeons are capable of switching between two tasks as quickly as humans -- and even more quickly in certain situations. (2017-09-26)
'Evolution: A Developmental Approach'
What separates humans from Chimpanzees? Is it the genetics of our population, or our different structures and behavior capabilities? (2011-01-27)
Use of primate 'actors' misleading millions of viewers
More needs to be done to educate audiences, including viewers at home and filmmakers, on the unethical nature of using primates in the film industry, says a leading expert in a new study. (2018-01-17)
Bridging the gap between human and animal communication
Cooperative turn-taking has been suggested as an ancient mechanism of the language system bridging the existing gap between the articulate human species and our inarticulate primate cousins. (2018-06-05)
FSU researcher: Modern civilization doesn't diminish violence
Modern civilization may not have dulled mankind's bloodlust, but living in a large, organized society may increase the likelihood of surviving a war, a Florida State University anthropology professor said. (2017-10-27)
What makes the deadliest form of malaria specific to people?
Why does the deadliest malaria parasite, Plasmodium Falciparum, only infect humans? (2013-12-02)
Chimpanzee calls differ according to context
An important question in the evolution of language is what caused animal calls to diversify and to encode different information. (2018-05-23)
Monkeys benefit from the nut-cracking abilities of chimpanzees and hogs
Researchers of the University of Amsterdam and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology describe for the first time the scavenging behaviour of mangabey monkeys, guinea fowls, and squirrels on energy-rich nut remnants cracked by chimpanzees and red river hogs. (2018-07-19)
Savanna chimpanzees suffer from heat stress
An international team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, has studied the physiological parameters of savanna and rainforest chimpanzees and compared their water and energy budgets as well as their stress levels. (2018-05-15)
Chimpanzees are 'indifferent' when it comes to altruism
New research into chimpanzees suggests that, when it comes to altruistically helping a fellow chimpanzee, they are 'indifferent.' (2016-12-20)
Promising new drug for Hep B tested at Texas Biomedical Research Institute
Research at the Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC) on the campus of Texas Biomedical Research Institute helped advance a new treatment now in human trials for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. (2017-11-07)
The origin of human bipedalism
While no one has an authoritative answer, anthropologists have long theorized that early humans began walking on two legs as a way to reduce locomotor energy costs. (2007-07-16)
What sports matches reveal about gender roles
In the modern era, it's clear that women can do just about anything that men can do. (2016-08-04)
Scientists left camera traps to record wild apes -- watch what happens
Researchers analyzed video from remote camera-trap devices placed in ape-populated forests throughout Africa to see how wild apes would react to these unfamiliar objects. (2019-03-14)
Chimpanzees modify grooming behavior when near higher ranking members
Chimpanzees modify grooming behavior when near higher ranking members. (2017-06-21)
Both chimpanzees and humans spontaneously imitate each other's actions 
Decades of research has shown that apes, in spite of their proverbial aping abilities, are rather poor imitators, especially when compared to human children. (2017-08-21)
Great tit birds have as much impulse control as chimpanzees
Biologists at Lund University in Sweden have in a recent study shown that the great tit, a common European songbird, has a tremendous capacity for self-control. (2018-07-30)
Uncovering the evolution of the brain
What makes us human, and where does this mysterious property of 'humanness' come from? (2019-02-12)
A case of the chimp sniffles or major outbreak? Syndromic surveillance may hold the key
Two sniffling chimps could be one too many for a wild chimpanzee community susceptible to respiratory disease outbreaks, report Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Minnesota. (2019-05-10)
Do animals think rationally?
Previous research has shown that animals can remember specific events, use tools and solve problems. (2017-11-01)
Chimpanzees sniff out strangers and family members
Primates, including humans, are usually thought of as visual animals with reduced reliance on the sense of smell. (2018-10-23)
New study: Male chimpanzees can be players and good fathers
New research suggests that male chimpanzees are more invested in protecting their own offspring than previously thought. (2016-11-08)
Female chimpanzees don't fight for 'queen bee' status
Male and female chimpanzees achieve social status in dramatically different ways, says a new study by Duke University primatologists. (2016-10-14)
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