Popular Chronic Illness News and Current Events

Popular Chronic Illness News and Current Events, Chronic Illness News Articles.
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Balancing the gut
Researchers from the Cluster of Excellence 'Precision Medicine in Chronic Inflammation' in Kiel and Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have uncovered a critical mechanism that controls immune reactions against microorganisms in the intestine. The results of the international study may contribute to the development of new therapies for chronic inflammatory bowel disease. They have been published in the journal Nature Immunology. (2019-02-26)

New blood pressure-lowering guidelines could benefit 25 million americans with chronic kidney disease
A recommendation for more intensive blood pressure management from an influential global nonprofit that publishes clinical practice guidelines in kidney disease could, if followed, benefit nearly 25 million Americans. (2021-02-23)

Poor sleep hastens progression of kidney disease
People with chronic kidney disease may be especially vulnerable to the deleterious effects of poor sleep, according to a new paper published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. (2017-09-14)

Fitness in childhood linked to healthy lungs in adulthood
Children who are fitter and whose fitness improves during childhood and adolescence have better lung function as young adults, according to a large study published in the European Respiratory Journal. (2018-01-31)

Unethical promotion of medicines is rife in India
The Indian government has failed to prevent the unethical and illegal promotion of prescription drugs, according to an editorial in this week's BMJ. (2004-04-01)

A foodborne illness outbreak could cost a restaurant millions, study suggests
A single foodborne outbreak could cost a restaurant millions of dollars in lost revenue, fines, lawsuits, legal fees, insurance premium increases, inspection costs and staff retraining, a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. (2018-04-16)

How the enzyme lipoxygenase drives heart failure after heart attacks
Heart failure after a heart attack is a global epidemic leading to heart failure pathology. Ganesh Halade, Ph.D., is seeking ways to delay or reverse this heart failure, which comes from non-resolved chronic inflammation. In a study in Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, Halade and colleagues detail the profound lipidomic and metabolic signatures and the modified leukocyte profiling that delay heart failure progression and provide improved survival in 12/15 lipoxygenase-deficient mice. (2019-05-31)

UTSA researchers explore little-known, deadly fungal infections
A new study by Althea Campuzano, Ph.D., a student at the University of Texas at San Antonio, and Floyd Wormley, Jr., Professor of Biology and Senior Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies, sheds light on little-known fungal infections caused by the fungus Cryptococcus. There are currently no vaccines available for any fungal infection, which can be extremely deadly to patients under treatment for diseases like HIV, AIDS and cancer. (2018-04-10)

Mysterious vaping illness characterized by fat-laden cells in the lung
University of Utah Health investigators have identified a previously unrecognized characteristic of the vaping-related respiratory illness that has been emerging in clusters across the US in recent months. Within these patients' lungs are large immune cells containing numerous oily droplets, called lipid-laden macrophages. The finding may allow doctors to definitively diagnose the nascent syndrome more quickly and could provide clues into causes of the condition. The research publishes in the New England Journal of Medicine. (2019-09-06)

New approach to predict respiratory allergy in early childhood
A new study in EBioMedicine by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the Medical University of Vienna, Austria, suggests that immune response in early childhood to a handful of allergen molecules can predict the onset of allergic rhinitis and asthma in adolescence. These findings could accelerate the development of preventive strategies and novel treatments for respiratory allergy in children. (2017-12-04)

Mental health matters
UCSB researchers study the effectiveness of an innovative program designed to help youth learn about mental health. (2016-10-13)

Experts provide insights on the body's stress response during critical illness
Critical illness causes the body to initiate a stress response, which activates the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis to increase the availability of the stress hormone cortisol. (2018-01-10)

New guidelines discourage use of brain imaging as a 'lie detector' for chronic pain
A task force consisting of researchers from around the world and led by a scientist at the Krembil Research Institute in Toronto has released a set of recommendations that advise against the use of brain imaging as a test for chronic pain. (2017-09-08)

Why stress doesn't always cause depression
Rats susceptible to anhedonia, a core symptom of depression, possess more serotonin neurons after being exposed to chronic stress, but the effect can be reversed through amygdala activation, according to new research in JNeurosci. (2019-12-02)

How highly contagious norovirus infection gets its start
Researchers have shown, in mice, that norovirus infects a rare type of intestinal cell called a tuft cell. Noroviruses tucked inside tuft cells are effectively hidden from the immune system, which could explain why some people continue to shed virus long after they are no longer sick. These 'healthy carriers' are thought to be the source of norovirus outbreaks, so understanding how the virus evades detection in such people could lead to better ways to prevent outbreaks. (2018-04-12)

Studies suggest inflammatory cytokines are associated with depression and psychosis, and that anti-cytokine treatment can reduce depression symptoms
Studies presented at this year's International Early Psychosis Association meeting in Milan, Italy, (Oct. 20-22) suggest that increased levels of inflammatory cytokines are associated with increased rates of depression and psychosis, and that treatment to reduce cytokine levels can reduce symptoms of depression. (2016-10-20)

Study: Sepsis survivors require follow-up support
Survivors of sepsis -- a life-threatening response to an infection -- have expressed a need for advocacy and follow-up support, according to a study authored by professors at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis, and published in Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing. (2019-11-19)

Wide variation in rate of death between VA hospitals for patients with heart disease, heart failure
Death rates for veterans with ischemic heart disease and chronic heart failure varied widely across the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system from 2010 to 2014, which could suggest differences in the quality of cardiovascular health care provided by VA medical centers. (2018-05-16)

Breastfeeding may protect against chronic pain after Caesarean section
Breastfeeding after a Caesarean section (C-section) may help manage pain, with mothers who breastfed their babies for at least two months after the operation three times less likely to experience persistent pain compared to those who breastfed for less than two months, according to new research being presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia Congress in Geneva (June 3-5). (2017-06-03)

Generous health insurance plans encourage overtreatment, but may not improve health
Offering comprehensive health insurance plans with low deductibles and co-pay in exchange for higher annual premiums seems like a good value for the risk averse, and a profitable product for insurance companies. But according to a study in a leading scholarly marketing journal, the INFORMS journal Marketing Science, such plans can encourage individuals with chronic conditions to turn to needlessly expensive treatments that have little impact on their health outcomes. (2017-06-05)

Danish-American research presents new ways of developing treatment of chronic inflammation
Researchers from Aarhus University Hospital and Aarhus University in Denmark in collaboration with researchers from Colorado in the United States have found a new way to treat the inflammation involved in chronic diseases such as psoriasis, asthma and HIV. A group of transmitter substances (cytokines) in the immune system, the so-called IL-1 family, has been shown to play an important role in many of these diseases by regulating the body's immune responses. (2019-08-30)

Study: Running helps brain stave off effects of chronic stress
The study, newly published in the journal of Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, finds that running mitigates the negative impacts chronic stress has on the hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for learning and memory. (2018-02-14)

Early-life events linked to lung health in young adulthood
Early-life events, such as the exposure to air pollutants, increases the risk of chronic lung disease in young adulthood, according to new results by researchers at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, published in the European Respiratory Journal and Thorax. The studies add to the growing evidence that chronic lung disease in adulthood can be traced back to childhood. (2020-11-12)

Testosterone replacement therapy may slow the progression of COPD
GALVESTON, Texas -- Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston found that testosterone replacement therapy may slow disease progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The paper is currently available in Chronic Respiratory Disease. (2018-09-13)

Annual influenza vaccination does not prevent natural immunity
Earlier studies have suggested that having repeated annual influenza vaccination can prevent natural immunity to the virus, and potentially increase the susceptibility to influenza illness in the event of a pandemic, or when the vaccine does not 'match' the virus circulating in the community. But now, researchers at the Influenza Center in Bergen have published a study, which concludes that annual influenza vaccination does not increase susceptibility to influenza infection in years of vaccine mismatch. (2017-11-13)

Research paves the way for treatment strategies of multidrug-resistant chronic infections
A new study published in Cell Press finds that antibiotic treatment of chronic infections can be optimized by targeting vulnerabilities of antibiotic-resistant pathogens paving the way for more effective treatment strategies. (2018-01-05)

Racism is a public health issue
Racism may be important in the development of illness and countering it should be considered a public health issue, argues a senior psychiatrist in this week's BMJ. (2003-01-09)

More than half of all opioid prescriptions go to people with mental illness
Fifty-one percent of all opioid medications distributed in the US each year are prescribed to adults with mood disorders such as depression and anxiety, according to new research from the University of Michigan and the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. (2017-06-27)

New mechanism of bacterial pathogenesis discovered
Scientists have identified a new mechanism of bacterial pathogenesis. The results of the research project, partly funded by the Academy of Finland, have been published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2012-06-27)

Improving pain care through implementation of the Stepped Care Model for Pain Management
A new study published in the Journal of Pain Research provides evidence that implementation of a Stepped Care Model for Pain Management has the potential to more adequately treat chronic pain. (2016-11-14)

mHealth as effective as clinic-based intervention for people with serious mental illness
A mobile health (mHealth) intervention was found to be as effective as a clinic-based group intervention for people with serious mental illness in a new study published online today in Psychiatric Services. In a randomized controlled trial, researchers compared an mHealth approach (FOCUS), using mobile phones to deliver intervention, to a more traditional clinic-based group intervention, the Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP). (2018-05-25)

Unexpected helpers in wound healing
Nerve cells in the skin help wounds to heal. When an injury occurs, cells known as glial cells change into repair cells and disseminate into the wound, where they help the skin to regenerate, researchers from the University of Zurich have shown. (2018-01-24)

New recommendations for endoscopic eradication therapy in Barrett's esophagus
A new guideline by the ASGE Standards of Practice Committee offers evidence-based recommendations and clinical guidelines addressing key issues related to Endoscopic Eradication Therapy (EET) in the management of Barrett's esophagus (BE)-related lesions. (2018-04-06)

Dangers of commonly prescribed painkillers highlighted in study
Commonly prescribed painkillers need to be given for shorter periods of time to reduce the risk of obesity and sleep deprivation, a new study has revealed. (2017-12-06)

Why you feel hungrier after you lose weight
Blame it on hormones: one hunger hormone continues to be elevated after you lose weight, making you feel hungry even though your new, slanker body has had enough to eat. (2018-02-08)

New study finds reading can help with chronic pain
A study conducted by researchers from the University of Liverpool, The Reader and the Royal Liverpool University Hospitals Trust, and funded by the British Academy, has found that shared reading (SR) can be a useful therapy for chronic pain sufferers. (2017-03-01)

Obesity drives US health care costs up by 29 percent, varies by state
Recent research by John Cawley, professor of policy analysis and management at Cornell University, provides new insights on how individual states are affected by the health care costs of obesity. (2018-02-08)

A new solution for chronic pain
Neuropathic pain is a chronic illness affecting 7-10 percent of the population in France and for which there is no effective treatment. Researchers at the Institute for Neurosciences of Montpellier (INSERM/Université de Montpellier) and the Laboratory for Therapeutic Innovation (CNRS/Université de Strasbourg) have uncovered the mechanism behind the appearance and continuation of pain. Based on their discovery, an innovative treatment was developed which produces, in animal subjects, an immediate, robust and long-lasting therapeutic effect on pain symptoms. (2018-03-12)

Chronic fatigue syndrome linked to stomach virus
Chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as ME, is linked to a stomach virus, suggests research published ahead of print in Journal of Clinical Pathology. The researchers base their findings on 165 patients with ME, all of whom were subjected to endoscopy because of longstanding gut complaints. (2007-09-13)

Linking heart attack damage to the spleen and kidney, an integrated study of heart failure
Ganesh Halade, who uses a mouse heart attack model to research ways to prevent heart failure, has published a functional and structural compendium of the simultaneous changes taking place in the heart, spleen and kidneys in mice during the period of acute heart failure immediately following a heart attack and during the longer period of chronic heart failure that comes next. (2017-11-15)

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