Popular Chronic Kidney Disease News and Current Events

Popular Chronic Kidney Disease News and Current Events, Chronic Kidney Disease News Articles.
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Balancing the gut
Researchers from the Cluster of Excellence 'Precision Medicine in Chronic Inflammation' in Kiel and Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have uncovered a critical mechanism that controls immune reactions against microorganisms in the intestine. The results of the international study may contribute to the development of new therapies for chronic inflammatory bowel disease. They have been published in the journal Nature Immunology. (2019-02-26)

Strike three
Researchers uncover a previously unrecognized mechanism that may accelerate polycystic kidney disease. (2019-08-26)

Geisinger study: PTSD a medical warning sign for long-term health problems
New Geisinger research finds that post-traumatic stress disorder is an indicator of long-term health problems, similar to biological warning signs such as elevated white blood cell counts. With an in-depth study of Vietnam vets, pioneering PTSD researcher Joseph Boscarino shows that PTSD leaves a distinct biological mark on a person's overall health. Considered a psychological or mental health problem, PTSD should now be viewed as a threat to a person's physical health, Boscarino concludes. (2008-02-13)

New blood pressure-lowering guidelines could benefit 25 million americans with chronic kidney disease
A recommendation for more intensive blood pressure management from an influential global nonprofit that publishes clinical practice guidelines in kidney disease could, if followed, benefit nearly 25 million Americans. (2021-02-23)

Stem cell 'twins' to study disease
Researchers report a new gene editing method that can modify a single DNA base in the human genome with absolute precision. (2018-03-05)

People with diabetes visit the dentist less frequently despite link between diabetes, oral health
Adults with diabetes are less likely to visit the dentist than people with prediabetes or without diabetes, finds a new study led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and East Carolina University's Brody School of Medicine. (2018-04-02)

Poor sleep hastens progression of kidney disease
People with chronic kidney disease may be especially vulnerable to the deleterious effects of poor sleep, according to a new paper published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. (2017-09-14)

Fitness in childhood linked to healthy lungs in adulthood
Children who are fitter and whose fitness improves during childhood and adolescence have better lung function as young adults, according to a large study published in the European Respiratory Journal. (2018-01-31)

MicroRNA could help treat cancer and asthma
MiR-223 shows promise for treating inflammatory disease. (2018-02-20)

Exercising muscle combats chronic inflammation on its own
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have demonstrated that human muscle has an innate ability to ward off damaging effects of chronic inflammation when exercised. The discovery was made possible through the use of lab-grown, engineered human muscle, demonstrating the potential power of the first-of-its-kind platform in such research endeavors. (2021-01-22)

Microbiome science may help doctors deliver more effective, personalized treatment to children with irritable bowel syndrome
To improve the treatment of children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), investigators have developed a sophisticated way to analyze the microbial and metabolic contents of the gut. A report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier, describes how a new battery of tests enables researchers to distinguish patients with IBS from healthy children and identifies correlations between certain microbes and metabolites with abdominal pain. With this information, doctors envision tailoring nutritional and targeted therapies that address a child's specific gastrointestinal problems. (2019-04-17)

Lung cancer may go undetected in kidney cancer patients
Could lung cancer be hiding in kidney cancer patients? Researchers with the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center's Kidney Cancer Program studied patients with metastatic kidney cancer to the lungs and found that 3.5 percent of the group had a primary lung cancer tumor that had gone undiagnosed. This distinction can affect treatment choices and rates of survival. (2017-03-07)

Avoiding obesity and maintaining stable weight both important in preventing several obesity-related cancers in women
Avoiding obesity as well as maintaining a stable weight in middle adulthood could help prevent certain cancers in women, according to new research presented at this year's European Conference on Obesity (ECO) in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26). (2018-05-23)

Small changes to organ procurement system could lead to more life-saving transplants
Slight changes to the system for allocating deceased-donor kidneys could result in higher rates of organ procurement and lead to more kidney transplants across the country, according to new research co-authored by an Indiana University Kelley School of Business professor. (2017-11-17)

Researchers discover experimental obesity drug prevents development of kidney stones
Copenhagen: Scientists have found that a drug connected with fat regulation prevents the formation of kidney stones in mice. This early work opens the possibility of developing drugs which may help prevent kidney stones in at-risk individuals. The work is presented at the European Association of Urology Conference in Copenhagen. (2018-03-16)

Bacterium present in eyes with 'wet' age-related macular degeneration
Researchers at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (MEEI) have found that Chlamydia pneumoniae, a bacterium linked to heart disease and capable of causing chronic inflammation, was present in the diseased eye tissue of five out of nine people with neovascular, or (2005-11-07)

New methods find undiagnosed genetic diseases in electronic health records
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center have found a way to search genetic data in electronic health records to identify undiagnosed genetic diseases in large populations so treatments can be tailored to the actual cause of the illness. (2018-03-15)

Study finds people with type 2 diabetes at higher risk of death from both obesity-related and non-obesity related cancers
Being overweight or obese may put adults with diabetes at greater risk of dying from cancer than their diabetes-free counterparts, particularly for obesity-related cancers such as those arising from the bowel, kidney, and pancreas in men and women, and from the breast and endometrium (lining of the uterus) in women. (2018-10-02)

How the enzyme lipoxygenase drives heart failure after heart attacks
Heart failure after a heart attack is a global epidemic leading to heart failure pathology. Ganesh Halade, Ph.D., is seeking ways to delay or reverse this heart failure, which comes from non-resolved chronic inflammation. In a study in Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, Halade and colleagues detail the profound lipidomic and metabolic signatures and the modified leukocyte profiling that delay heart failure progression and provide improved survival in 12/15 lipoxygenase-deficient mice. (2019-05-31)

New guidelines discourage use of brain imaging as a 'lie detector' for chronic pain
A task force consisting of researchers from around the world and led by a scientist at the Krembil Research Institute in Toronto has released a set of recommendations that advise against the use of brain imaging as a test for chronic pain. (2017-09-08)

Investigational drug with immunotherapy may provide new therapeutic opportunity for patients previously treated for kidney and lung cancer
Investigational drug with immunotherapy may provide new therapeutic opportunity for patients previously treated for kidney and lung cancer. Pegilodecakin with pembrolizumab and nivolumab shown to be safe in Phase 1B study (2019-09-25)

Nicotine: The link between cigarette smoking and kidney disease progression?
The mechanisms by which cigarette smoke may accelerate some types of chronic kidney disease are currently unknown. A new study demonstrates for the first time that human mesangial cells (MC) - cells in the blood vessels of the kidneys -- are endowed with nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) á4, á5, á7, â2, â3, â4 and â5 (cells that interact with the nicotine in tobacco) and may play an active role in the development of certain kidney diseases. (2007-01-29)

Breastfeeding may protect against chronic pain after Caesarean section
Breastfeeding after a Caesarean section (C-section) may help manage pain, with mothers who breastfed their babies for at least two months after the operation three times less likely to experience persistent pain compared to those who breastfed for less than two months, according to new research being presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia Congress in Geneva (June 3-5). (2017-06-03)

Generous health insurance plans encourage overtreatment, but may not improve health
Offering comprehensive health insurance plans with low deductibles and co-pay in exchange for higher annual premiums seems like a good value for the risk averse, and a profitable product for insurance companies. But according to a study in a leading scholarly marketing journal, the INFORMS journal Marketing Science, such plans can encourage individuals with chronic conditions to turn to needlessly expensive treatments that have little impact on their health outcomes. (2017-06-05)

ESC press release: Loss of muscle and weight associated with disability after stroke
Loss of muscle and body weight is associated with disability after stroke, reports a study presented today at Heart & Stroke 2019, a meeting of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Stroke, and published in the Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle. (2019-01-25)

Maternal chronic disease linked to higher rates of congenital heart disease in babies
Pregnant women with congenital heart defects or type 2 diabetes have a higher risk of giving birth to babies with severe congenital heart disease and should be monitored closely in the prenatal period, according to a study published in CMAJ. (2016-10-11)

Danish-American research presents new ways of developing treatment of chronic inflammation
Researchers from Aarhus University Hospital and Aarhus University in Denmark in collaboration with researchers from Colorado in the United States have found a new way to treat the inflammation involved in chronic diseases such as psoriasis, asthma and HIV. A group of transmitter substances (cytokines) in the immune system, the so-called IL-1 family, has been shown to play an important role in many of these diseases by regulating the body's immune responses. (2019-08-30)

Study: Running helps brain stave off effects of chronic stress
The study, newly published in the journal of Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, finds that running mitigates the negative impacts chronic stress has on the hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for learning and memory. (2018-02-14)

Link between obesity and cancer is not widely recognized
A new study published in the Journal of Public Health has shown that the majority of people in the United Kingdom do not understand the connection between weight issues and cancer. Obesity is associated with thirteen types of cancer, including those of the breast, kidney, bowel, and womb. However, after surveying 3293 adults, taken as representative of the UK population, researchers found that only a quarter of respondents were aware of the link between obesity and cancer. (2017-11-17)

New 3-D technology improving patient care for complex kidney surgeries
Surgeons use unique 3-D solution to prepare for complex surgery that includes a glasses-free 3-D monitor in the operating room that allows them to navigate patient's atypical anatomy. (2017-03-09)

Zinc deficiency may play a role in high blood pressure
Lower-than-normal zinc levels may contribute to high blood pressure (hypertension) by altering the way the kidneys handle sodium. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology--Renal Physiology. (2019-01-24)

Early-life events linked to lung health in young adulthood
Early-life events, such as the exposure to air pollutants, increases the risk of chronic lung disease in young adulthood, according to new results by researchers at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, published in the European Respiratory Journal and Thorax. The studies add to the growing evidence that chronic lung disease in adulthood can be traced back to childhood. (2020-11-12)

Time to reassess blood-pressure goals
High blood pressure or hypertension is a major health problem that affects more than 70 million people in the US, and over one billion worldwide. Despite being a critically important risk factor for heart and kidney disease, defining the 'optimal' blood pressure has been a challenge. (2015-11-09)

Experts call for action to address physician burnout in nephrology
Kidney specialists face increasing work demands, high rates of burnout, and declining interest in nephrology as a career. A group of articles publishing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN) sheds light on how that these factors threaten to reduce job satisfaction and impair the delivery of high-quality care to patients with kidney diseases. (2018-01-11)

Renal hemodynamics and cardiovascular function in health and disease
The SRC will focus on unpublished work that is state-of-the-art in study of cardiovascular and renal disease and hypertension. (2016-01-28)

Air pollution is associated with cancer mortality beyond lung cancer
A large scale epidemiological study associates some air pollutants with kidney, bladder and colorectal cancer death. (2017-10-31)

Technology may help increase number of kidneys transplanted
Many deceased donor kidneys are declined for transplantation because of concerns over their quality, but a new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) study found that a technique called normothermic machine perfusion can assess the quality of a kidney and determine its suitability for transplantation. (2017-12-06)

Kidney stones on the rise, Mayo Clinic study finds
Kidney stones are a painful health condition, often requiring multiple procedures at great discomfort to the patient. Growing evidence suggests that the incidence of kidney stones is increasing steadily, especially in women. Using data from the Rochester Epidemiology Project, Mayo Clinic researchers investigated the rise in stone formers to determine if this is a new trend, or simply an improvement in the way kidney stones are detected. Their findings appear in the March issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2018-02-13)

Statins associated with reduced morbidity and mortality in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitischolangi
An award-winning register-based study reports a reduced risk of all-cause mortality, liver transplantation, liver cancer, and variceal bleeding in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis exposed to statins. (2018-04-12)

Research paves the way for treatment strategies of multidrug-resistant chronic infections
A new study published in Cell Press finds that antibiotic treatment of chronic infections can be optimized by targeting vulnerabilities of antibiotic-resistant pathogens paving the way for more effective treatment strategies. (2018-01-05)

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