Popular Cigarette News and Current Events

Popular Cigarette News and Current Events, Cigarette News Articles.
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Don't treat e-cigarettes like cigarettes
Assuming e-cigarettes are equal to cigarettes could lead to misguided research and policy initiatives, reports a new Northwestern Medicine commentary, published Friday, Sept. 28, in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research. The commentary distills articles and published studies that compare e-cigarettes to cigarettes and supports the importance of investigating e-cigarettes as a unique nicotine delivery system. It was published less than a month after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration declared youth vaping an epidemic. (2018-10-01)

The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health: 40% of countries show no progress in reducing cigarette smoking in adolescents over last 20 years
Despite an overall reduction in cigarette use over the last 20 years, nearly 1 in 5 boys (17.9%) and more than 1 in 10 girls (11.5%) around the world used tobacco at least once in the past month between 2010-2018, according to a new study published today in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal. (2021-02-02)

Predictors of successfully quitting smoking among smokers registered at the quit smoking clinic at a public hospital in northeastern Malaysia
In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health, Nur Izzati Mohammad et al. consider how cigarette smoking is one of the risk factors leading to noncommunicable diseases such as cardiovascular and respiratory system diseases and cancer. (2019-01-04)

Cigarette butts hamper plant growth -- study
Researchers have shown for the first time that cigarette butts reduce plant growth. Cigarette butts are the most common form of litter worldwide, with an estimated 4.5 trillion discarded annually. (2019-07-19)

E-cigarettes may be more harmful than beneficial according to evidence-based research
The popularity of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) has grown rapidly in the United States over the past decade. E-cigarettes may help cigarette smokers quit smoking, but they may also encourage transitions to start smoking cigarettes. Based on available evidence, Dartmouth researchers quantified the balance of health benefits and harms associated with e-cigarette use at the population level and found that e-cigarettes could substantially increase the number of adolescents and young adults who eventually become cigarette smokers. (2018-03-14)

Airway-on-a-chip could lead to new treatments for cigarette smoke-induced lung injury
Researchers have developed an airway-on-a-chip that supports living small-airway-lining cells from normal or diseased human lungs and an instrument that 'breathes' cigarette smoke in and out over these chips. Using this technology, researchers from the Wyss Institute at Harvard University recreated and analyzed the effects of smoking at the molecular, cellular, and tissue level to understand the damage occurring in normal lung and in engineered lung tissues from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). (2016-10-27)

Poor oral health may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer among African American women
African American women with poor oral health may be more likely to get pancreatic cancer (PC). (2019-03-28)

Fake social media accounts can be hazardous to your health
Fake social media accounts already have a reputation of swaying political discourse, but a Keck School of Medicine of USC researcher says these automated accounts are even more dangerous -- they can be bad for your health. USC researchers focused on how these bots promoted the notion that using electronic cigarettes helps people stop smoking, a conclusion not definitively supported by research. (2017-12-20)

No safe level of smoking
People who consistently smoked an average of less than one cigarette per day over their lifetime had a 64 percent higher risk of earlier death than people who never smoked. (2016-12-05)

Nicotine: The link between cigarette smoking and kidney disease progression?
The mechanisms by which cigarette smoke may accelerate some types of chronic kidney disease are currently unknown. A new study demonstrates for the first time that human mesangial cells (MC) - cells in the blood vessels of the kidneys -- are endowed with nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) á4, á5, á7, â2, â3, â4 and â5 (cells that interact with the nicotine in tobacco) and may play an active role in the development of certain kidney diseases. (2007-01-29)

As smoking declines, more are likely to quit
Smokeless tobacco and, more recently, e-cigarettes have been promoted as a harm reduction strategy for smokers who are 'unable or unwilling to quit.' The strategy, embraced by both industry and some public health advocates, is based on the assumption that as smoking declines overall, only those who cannot quit will remain. A new study by researchers at UC San Francisco has found just the opposite. (2015-06-24)

Association of quitting smoking during pregnancy, risk of preterm birth
This study of more than 25 million pregnant women reports on rates of smoking cessation at the start of and during pregnancy and also examines the association of quitting cigarette smoking and the risk of preterm birth. (2019-04-19)

Toxicant levels up to 99 percent less in myblu™ aerosols compared to cigarette smoke
A new aerosol chemistry study presented at the 1st Scientific Summit -- Tobacco Harm Reduction: Novel products, Research & Policy, has revealed toxicant levels in myblu pod-system e-cigarette aerosols are up to 99 percent lower than in cigarette smoke. (2018-06-11)

Fewer Americans think smoking a pack a day poses a great health risk
About 3 out of 4 Americans agree that smoking cigarettes causes health problems, but public perception of the risks posed by smoking may be declining, according to a Duke Health study published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence. (2018-02-27)

Smoke-damaged airway tissue restored on switching to glo
Studies by British American Tobacco show that airway tissue damaged on exposure to smoke was restored when exposed to vapor from glo rather than smoke. These results add to evidence that glo has reduced risk potential compared to cigarettes. glo is a tobacco heating product designed to heat rather than burn tobacco. Tests show that glo heated tobacco vapor has around 90-95 percent less of certain toxicants than cigarette smoke. (2018-03-14)

Cigarette price differences and infant mortality in the European Union
Higher cigarette prices were associated with reduced infant mortality in the European Union, while increased price differences between premium and budget cigarettes were associated with higher infant mortality, according to a new article published by JAMA Pediatrics. (2017-09-18)

No adverse health impacts from long term vaping -- Study
A new peer-reviewed clinical trial to be published in the February edition of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology shows that regular use of e-cigarettes does not have any negative health impact on smokers. (2018-01-17)

Vaping doubles risk of smoking cigarettes for teens
Teenagers who try e-cigarettes double their risk for smoking tobacco cigarettes, according to a new study. The study -- from the University of Waterloo and the Wake Forest School of Medicine -- found that students in grades seven to 12 who had tried an e-cigarette are 2.16 times more likely to be susceptible to cigarette smoking. (2017-09-18)

Cannabis use up among parents with children in the home
Cannabis use increased among parents who smoke cigarettes, as well as among non-smoking parents, according to a new study. Cannabis use was nearly four times more common among cigarette smokers compared with non-smokers. Until now, little had been known about current trends in the use of cannabis among parents with children in the home, the prevalence of exposure to both tobacco and cannabis, and which populations might be at greatest risk. (2018-05-14)

Effect of deployment on use of e-cigarettes in US military
At the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Prescott McWilliams, United States Air Force, San Antonio, Texas and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU), Postgraduate Dental College (PDC), presented a poster titled 'Effect of Deployment on Use of E-Cigarettes in U.S. Military.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., USA from March 21-24, 2018. (2018-03-23)

Study shows a potential new approach to opioid crisis
In a six-month study recently concluded, a research unit affiliated with two hospital institutions and a university in Ottawa found that a reduction in the number of cigarettes smoked daily also reduced a smoker's dependence on opioids. (2018-01-25)

Scientists discover how cigarette smoke causes cancer: Study points to new treatments, safer tobacco
Everyone has known for decades that that smoking can kill, but until now no one really understood how cigarette smoke causes healthy lung cells to become cancerous. In a research report published in the March print issue of The FASEB Journal, researchers show that hydrogen peroxide (or similar oxidants) in cigarette smoke is the culprit. This finding may help the tobacco industry develop (2008-02-28)

E-cig use increases risk of beginning tobacco cigarette use in young adults
Young adults who use electronic cigarettes are more than four times as likely to begin smoking tobacco cigarettes within 18 months as their peers who do not vape, according to new University of Pittsburgh research. The findings demonstrate that e-cigarettes are serving as a gateway to traditional smoking, contrary to their purported value as a smoking cessation tool. The study is the first nationally representative survey that followed for more than a year people 18 to 30 years old who were initially nonsmokers. (2017-12-11)

Alcohol ads linked to teen alcohol brand choices
Overall exposure to brand-specific alcohol advertising is a significant predictor of underage youth alcohol brand consumption, with youth ages 13 to 20 more than five times more likely to consume brands that advertise on national television and 36 percent more likely to consume brands that advertise in national magazines compared to brands that don't advertise in these media. (2015-10-20)

Advocating for raising the smoking age to 21
Henry Ford Hospital pulmonologist Daniel Ouellette, M.D., who during his 31-year career in medicine has seen the harmful effects of smoking on his patients, advocates for raising the smoking age to 21. He says the move would help curb access to tobacco products at an early age and lead to reductions in smoking prevalence. (2015-10-22)

A 'joint' problem: Investigating marijuana and tobacco co-use
A survey of marijuana and tobacco co-users by Medical University of South Carolina investigators found that co-users with high degree of interrelatedness between their use of the two substances had greater tobacco dependence and smoked more cigarettes per day. However, the finding of a strong link between the two substances was not universal. These findings, reported in Addictive Behaviors, suggest that highly personalized treatments are needed for co-users who want to quit smoking. (2019-02-22)

Smoking during pregnancy increases risk of SIDS
A new study provides the most direct evidence that there exists a causal link between smoking during pregnancy and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Clinicians have long considered prenatal cigarette smoke exposure a major contributing risk factor for SIDS, but researchers had not proved a casual relationship. Other contributing factors include disturbances of breathing and heart rate regulation and impaired arousal responses, thermal stress (primarily overheating from too high temperatures or too much clothing) and sleeping in the prone (belly-down) position. (2008-05-30)

Tobacco smoke makes germs more resilient
University of Louisville School of Dentistry researcher David A. Scott, Ph.D., explores how cigarettes lead to colonization of bacteria in the body. (2016-05-31)

Smokers might benefit from earlier colon cancer screening
New evidence suggests screening for colorectal cancer, which is now recommended to begin at age 50 for most people, should start five to 10 years earlier for individuals with a significant lifetime exposure to tobacco smoke, a University of Rochester Medical Center study said. (2008-02-13)

Study finds that quitting smoking during pregnancy lowers risk of preterm births
Dartmouth-led study of more than 25 million pregnant women reports on rates of smoking cessation at the start of and during pregnancy and also examines the association of quitting cigarette smoking and the risk of preterm birth. (2019-04-19)

Higher cigarette taxes may increase use of chewing tobacco and cigars in adolescents
Raising cigarette taxes to combat smoking may increase the use of cigars and smokeless tobacco, such as chewing tobacco, in adolescents according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Public Health, involving 499,381 adolescents. (2018-02-14)

Study suggests vaping does not stain teeth
Scientists at British American Tobacco have studied the impact of the vapor from Vype, an e-cigarette and glo, a tobacco-heating-product, on teeth and compared it to that of cigarette smoke. The results show that teeth exposed to Vype e-cigarette vapor or vapor from glo do not become stained, whereas teeth exposed to cigarette smoke became stained very quickly. (2018-03-24)

First-of-its-kind study in endothelial stem cells finds exposure to flavored e-cigarette liquids, e-cigarette use exacerbates cell dysfunction
There has been a rapid rise in e-cigarette use, but its health effects have not been well-studied and their effect on vascular health remains unknown. A first of its kind study in endothelial stem cells, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, found acute exposure to flavored e-liquids or e-cigarette use exacerbates endothelial cell dysfunction, which often precedes heart disease. (2019-05-27)

How environmental pollutants and genetics work together in rheumatoid arthritis
New research documents how chemicals and a certain gene activate an enzyme to increase the risk and severity of RA and bone destruction. (2018-04-19)

E-cigarettes may lead to accumulation of fat in the liver
Using e-cigarettes may lead to an accumulation of fat in the liver, a study of mice exposed to the devices suggests. The research will be presented Sunday, March 18, at ENDO 2018, the Endocrine Society's 100th annual meeting in Chicago, Ill. (2018-03-18)

Breastfeeding mothers stop nursing sooner when living with smokers
Nursing mothers who live with two or more smokers are more likely to stop breastfeeding sooner than those who live in nonsmoking households. (2018-06-27)

E-cigarette vapor slows heart rate in mice
Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) such as e-cigarettes, affect heart rhythm and cardiovascular function in mice, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians. (2017-11-12)

For racial minority adolescents, cigarette and alcohol use linked to suicidality
Examining more than 20 years of national data for US adolescents, a research team led by Andrew Subica at the University of California, Riverside reports that adolescents have high prevalence of alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use, and concerning rates of suicide-related thoughts and behaviors. The data show that among U.S. adolescents in ninth to 12th grades, 75 percent had used alcohol, 58 percent had used cigarettes, and 41 percent tried marijuana. (2018-04-13)

States with strong tobacco control measures have fewer e-cigarette users
States with robust tobacco control policies and regulations, such as smoke free air laws and taxes on cigarettes, not only have fewer cigarette users but also fewer e-cigarette users, according to research from NYU School of Medicine and the NYU College of Global Public Health. (2018-02-27)

Common e-cigarette chemical flavorings may impair lung function
Two chemicals widely used to flavor electronic cigarettes may be impairing the function of cilia in the human airway, according to a new study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. (2019-02-01)

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