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Popular Circadian Rhythms News and Current Events, Circadian Rhythms News Articles.
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Can't sleep? Could be down to genetics
Researchers have identified specific genes that may trigger the development of sleep problems, and have also demonstrated a genetic link between insomnia and psychiatric disorders such as depression, or physical conditions such as type 2 diabetes. The study in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, which is published by Springer Nature, was led by Murray Stein of the University of California San Diego and the VA San Diego Healthcare System. (2018-03-09)

Is ADHD really a sleep problem?
Around 75 percent of children and adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) also have sleep problems, but until now these have been thought to be separate issues. Now a in a pulling together of the latest research, Scientists are proposing of a new theory which says that much of ADHD may in fact be a problem associated with lack of regular circadian sleep. (2017-09-02)

The circadian clock controls the cell cycle and tumor growth in plants
Biological rhythms are ubiquitous in nature, from the beating of the heart to the rhythms of flowering plants. A research team led by the Spanish researcher, Paloma Mas, has shown that the two main cellular oscillators -- the circadian clock and the cell cycle -- are closely connected. The study demonstrates that the circadian clock controls the speed of the cell cycle, regulating the cell division and growth in synchronization with the day and night cycles. (2018-03-22)

Timing of stress-hormone pulses controls weight gain, Stanford study finds
New research provides the first molecular understanding of why people gain weight due to chronic stress, disrupted circadian rhythms and treatment with glucocorticoid drugs: it's all in the timing of the dips and rises of a class of hormones called glucocorticoids -- predominantly the 'stress hormone' cortisol, according to a new study by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers. (2018-04-03)

For children, immersion in a rainforest lifestyle can lead to more diverse gut microbes
Can immersing yourself in a South American jungle and the high-fiber, unprocessed diet of its villagers make your gut microbes more diverse? And could it have benefits for people with obesity, type 1 diabetes and other disorders? A study led by Rutgers University-New Brunswick researchers followed seven city-dwelling adults and children who lived in a remote Venezuelan jungle village without electricity, soap or other amenities for 16 days. (2018-08-29)

Clapping Music app reveals that changing rhythm isn't so easy
Scientists at Queen Mary University of London have developed an app to understand why some rhythms are more difficult to perform than others. (2018-10-19)

Studying sleep's profound and extensive effects on brain function
Although the general benefits of a good night's sleep are well established, one-third of American adults do not get a sufficient amount of sleep. Recent research sheds new light on the extensive effects of sleep on the brain, as well as the harms caused by sleep loss. The studies were presented at Neuroscience 2017, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. (2017-11-12)

Powering up the circadian rhythm
Salk team first to discover protein that controls the strength of body's circadian rhythms. (2016-05-26)

Could the biological clock be a key ally in the fight against inflammatory disease?
What if the symptoms and seriousness of certain inflammatory diseases were linked to time of day? Researchers from Inserm have been working on this hypothesis, after noting that the seriousness and mortality associated with fulminant hepatitis were dependent on the time at which the disease was induced. Their study, conducted on human cells and mice, shows that the anti-inflammatory action of a biological clock protein could prevent the onset of fulminant hepatitis, by alleviating symptoms and increasing survival rates. (2018-01-26)

Three genes essential for cells to tell time
One family of genes allows cells to adapt to daily changes in environmental conditions by adjusting their internal 'body clock,' the circadian clock responsible for regular sleep-wake cycles. The new discovery by University of Tokyo scientists reveals for the first time that circadian regulation may be directly connected to cellular stress. (2018-03-19)

Study dives into genetic risk of Alzheimer's and dementia for diverse Latinx groups
To better understand the association of the APOE gene with cognitive decline in Latinx populations, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and collaborators analyzed metrics of cognitive decline in six diverse Latinx populations: those of Cuban, Central American, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, and South American backgrounds. They found that the APOE-ε4 genetic variant was associated with risk of cognitive decline in Latinx populations, with the strongest effect among those of Cuban backgrounds. (2020-11-06)

Fish oil -- helpful or harmful?
Fish oil supplements may help some cardiac patients while harming others, suggests a new review of evidence compiled by St. Michael's Hospital and University of Toronto researchers. In a systematic review of trials where patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators used fish oil supplements, Dr. David Jenkins and Dr. Paul Dorian found significant differences among the trials, indicating fish oil may be beneficial to some patients while having a negative impact on others. (2008-01-14)

After searching 12 years for bipolar disorder's cause, U-M team concludes it has many
Nearly 6 million Americans have bipolar disorder, and most have probably wondered why. After more than a decade of studying over 1,100 of them in-depth, a team of scientists has an answer -- or rather, seven answers. (2017-12-15)

The rhythm of genes: How the circadian clock regulates 3-D chromatin structure
EPFL biologists and geneticists have uncovered how the circadian clock orchestrates the 24-hour cycle of gene expression by regulating the structure of chromatin, the tightly wound DNA-protein complex of the cell. The work is published in Genes & Development. (2018-03-26)

Clockwork under the microscope
Circadian clocks regulate the behaviour of all living things. Scientists from the University of Würzburg have now taken a closer look at the clock's anatomical structures and molecular processes in the honeybee. (2018-01-16)

Could melatonin be the key to healthy aging?
A new British Journal of Pharmacology review highlights the role of melatonin -- a hormone that is produced at night -- in regulating sleep and the body's biological, or circadian, clock. Research suggests that melatonin treatments may even help to improve the restorative value of sleep and to promote healthy physical and mental aging. (2018-01-10)

New doctors' intense and changing schedules take a toll on sleep, activity and mood
This week, thousands of graduating medical students around the country will find out where they'll head next, to start their residency training. But a new study gives the first objective evidence of the heavy toll that the first year of residency can take on their sleep, physical activity and mood. (2018-03-15)

Novel pathway identified in development of acute myeloid leukemia with poor prognosis
NUS researchers have discovered a new pathway by which a severe form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) develops. The main player in the pathway, a protein called SHARP1, promotes leukemia development and maintenance, both on its own and through its actions on other genes. The discovery could lead to the development of novel SHARP1-specific treatments for this difficult-to-treat form of AML. (2018-04-24)

Poor grades tied to class times that don't match our biological clocks
It may be time to tailor students' class schedules to their natural biological rhythms. A study from UC Berkeley and Northeastern Illinois University shows that students whose circadian rhythms were out of sync with their class schedules received lower grades due to 'social jet lag,' a condition in which peak alertness times are at odds with work, school or other demands. (2018-03-29)

Clocking in with malaria parasites
Discovery of a malaria parasite's internal clock could lead to new treatment strategies. (2020-06-09)

The love lives of fruit flies
New study reveals that a male fruit fly's decision to court or ignore a female stems from the convergence of motivation, perception and chance. The triad affects the balance of excitatory versus inhibitory signals in the brain to influence decision making. Findings may yield insights about addiction disorders, depression. (2018-07-13)

U of G study reveals why heart failure patients suffer depression, impaired thinking
A new study by University of Guelph researchers explains why heart failure patients often have trouble with thinking and depression, pointing to ways to prevent and treat both heart and brain maladies through the emerging field of circadian medicine. (2019-04-05)

Cancer overrides the circadian clock to survive
Tumor cells use the unfolded protein response to alter circadian rhythm, which contributes to more tumor growth, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) find. A key part of the the circadian clock opposes this process, according to a report published online on December 11 in Nature Cell Biology. (2017-12-28)

New leads in the development and treatment of liver disease
A treatment gap remains for many conditions involving damage to the liver, the body's main organ for removing toxins, among other functions. The Experimental Biology 2018 meeting (EB 2018) will feature important research announcements related to the causes of liver degradation and possible treatments. (2018-04-21)

Body clock disruptions occur years before memory loss in Alzheimer's
People with Alzheimer's disease have disturbances in their internal body clocks that affect the sleep/wake cycle and may increase risk of developing the disorder. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that such circadian rhythm disruptions also occur much earlier in people whose memories are intact but whose brain scans show early, preclinical evidence of Alzheimer's. (2018-01-29)

Sex differences in 'body clock' may benefit women's heart health
Research suggests that a gene that governs the body's biological (circadian) clock acts differently in males versus females and may protect females from heart disease. The study is the first to analyze circadian blood pressure rhythms in female mice. The research, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology--Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for January. (2019-01-10)

Atherosclerosis: Stopped on time
For the first time, LMU researchers are pointing out the influence of the internal clock on atherosclerosis. Their study gives an important indication on how the therapeutic approach can be improved. (2018-05-31)

Cicardian system suffers and protects from prenatal cocaine exposure
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine have shown that prenatal cocaine exposure in zebrafish (which share the majority of the same genes with humans) can alter neuronal development and acutely dysregulate the expression of circadian genes and those affecting melatonin signaling, growth and neurotransmission. The circadian factors, including the principal circadian hormone melatonin, can attenuate the prenatal effects of cocaine. These findings appear in the July 11 issue of the journal PLoS ONE. (2007-07-10)

SEX4, starch and phosphorylation
Mutational and structural analyses by Dr. Zeeman and his colleagues have revealed that starch degradation in Arabidopsis leaves at night differs significantly from the versions traditionally described in textbooks. (2008-06-26)

The circadian clock sets the pace of plant growth
Researchers at the Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG) discover that the members of a protein family from the plant internal clock act sequentially to limit the plant growth until the end of the night. This knowledge could help to understand how plants face different kinds of stress that affect their growth, such as drought or high temperature. (2018-01-11)

Cell therapy could improve brain function for Alzheimer's disease
Inhibitory interneurons are particularly important for managing brain rhythms. They're also the research focus of a laboratory led by Jorge Palop, PhD, assistant investigator at the Gladstone Institutes. In a study published in Neuron, Palop and his collaborators uncovered the therapeutic benefits of genetically improving these interneurons and transplanting them into the brain of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. (2018-03-15)

Light-induced hormone surge points to benefits of light therapy
A report in the November Cell Metabolism reveals powerful effects of light on the adrenal glands, a finding that might explain the broad benefits of bright light therapy for a variety of conditions, including sleep and depressive disorders, according to researchers. The body's two adrenal glands sit atop each kidney, where they secrete hormones that regulate stress response and metabolism. (2005-11-08)

Meeting a microbe in the morning or in the evening: Is it all the same?
Does the time of day matter when our body is infected by a parasite? According to new research from McGill University, it matters a great deal. (2017-09-08)

Beware of evening stress
Stressful events in the evening release less of the body's stress hormones than those that happen in the morning, suggesting possible vulnerability to stress in the evening. (2018-11-26)

Skipping breakfast associated with hardening of the arteries
Skipping breakfast is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis, or the hardening and narrowing of arteries due to a build-up of plaque, according to research published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2017-10-02)

'Morning larks' have weaker sleep spindles during night than 'night owls'
A new study from the University of Helsinki shows that individual circadian preference is associated with brain activity patterns during the night. (2017-11-03)

Night shifts and unhealthy lifestyle linked to particularly high risk of type 2 diabetes
Women who work intermittent night shifts and do not follow a healthy lifestyle face an especially high risk of type 2 diabetes, suggests a study published by The BMJ today. (2018-11-21)

CLOCK gene may hold answers to human brain evolution
A gene controlling our biological clocks plays a vital role in regulating human-specific genes important to brain evolution. The findings from the O'Donnell Brain Institute open new paths of research into how CLOCK proteins produced by the CLOCK gene affect brain function and the processes by which neurons find their proper place in the brain. (2017-12-06)

The insulin under the influence of light
By understanding how the brain links the effects of insulin to light, researchers (UNIGE) are deciphering how insulin sensitivity fluctuates according to circadian cycles. At the heart of their discovery are neurons of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, a part of the brain that masters this balance. These results should also encourage diabetic patients to consider the best time to take insulin to properly control its effect and limit the risk of hypoglycemia. (2019-05-21)

Switching to hunter-gatherer lifestyle may increase diversity in children's gut microbes
An international team of researchers has shown that immersing city dwellers in the traditional lifestyle and diet of a rainforest village for two weeks increases the diversity of the visiting children's -- but not the adults' -- gut microbiota. In a small pilot study published this week in mSphere®, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, the team shows that the immersion visit did little to shift the adults' skin, oral, nasal and fecal microbiota. (2018-08-29)

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