Popular Citations News and Current Events

Popular Citations News and Current Events, Citations News Articles.
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Harnessing the potential of blockchain to transform education
Blockchain technology can help improve old models of data management and bring benefits to learners and educational institutions in the EU -- if policymakers are well prepared to embrace the change. (2018-01-05)

How social media helps scientists get the message across
Analyzing the famous academic aphorism 'publish or perish' through a modern digital lens, a group of emerging ecologists and conservation scientists wanted to see whether communicating their new research discoveries through social media -- primarily Twitter -- eventually leads to higher citations years down the road. Turns out, the tweets are worth the time investment. (2018-04-12)

Stanford University study: 12 Tel Aviv University researchers among top 50 in the world
A new study from Stanford University identified 12 Tel Aviv University (TAU) researchers among the world's top 50 researchers in their fields. 333 TAU faculty members were also ranked among the top 2% of researchers in their respective disciplines based on publications, citations, and impact. 155 of them are included in the top 1%, and 74 in the top 0.5%. (2020-12-21)

Does obesity lead to more nursing home admission and a lower quality of care?
In a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, researchers examined the care that obese older adults receive when they are admitted to nursing homes. (2016-05-31)

A model explains effects like the formation of clouds from the sea
All liquids always contain gases in a greater or lesser concentration, depending on the pressure and temperature to which it is subjected. Almost always, these gases end up as more or less small bubbles on the surface of the liquid. When these bubbles explode, especially if they are microscopic, minuscule drops are expelled at great velocity, and these drops almost instantly travel notable distances from the surface of the liquid that they came from. (2017-11-29)

JOT releases orthopaedic residency program rankings by research output
What's the best way to rate the quality and quantity of research produced by orthopaedic surgery residency programs? A new 'research impact ranking' provides a more objective approach to assessing and comparing research productivity at US orthopaedic departments, according to a study in the November Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma (JOT), published by Wolters Kluwer. (2018-01-10)

Study finds diversity boosts innovation in US companies
A recent study finds that taking steps to foster diversity makes a company more innovative, in terms of product innovations, patents created and citations on patents -- meaning the relevant innovations are also used to develop new technologies. (2018-01-09)

Even physicists are 'afraid' of mathematics
Physicists avoid highly mathematical work despite being trained in advanced mathematics, new research suggests. (2016-11-11)

Scientific misconduct harms prior collaborators
Luxembourg, 14 March 2018 - Scientists should choose their associates carefully, researchers at the University of Luxembourg and the Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW), Mannheim, recommend, as future misconduct by colleagues could seriously impact the reputation of their former collaborators. (2018-03-15)

The evolution of neuroscience as a research
When the first issue of the JDR was published, the field of neuroscience did not exist but over subsequent decades neuroscience has emerged as a scientific field that has particular relevance to dentistry. The JDR Centennial article 'The Evolution of Neuroscience as a Research Field Relevant to Dentistry' reviews many of the novel insights that have been gained through neuroscience research into the neural basis of these functions and their clinical relevance to the diagnosis and management of pain and sensorimotor disorders. (2019-11-20)

Call for unis and others to consider women juggling research/childcare
Offering financial aid to cover childcare costs for female academics attending conferences is one of the suggestions offered by QUT researchers who surveyed Australian women on how caring for children has affected their careers. They also recommend institutions and funding bodies that use publication and citation benchmarks as a key criteria for appointment, promotion and the awarding of grants should adjust those to cater for women who have cared for children. (2019-03-29)

Citations show academic and non-academic researchers 'win' when they collaborate
Findings in new PNAS paper indicate that when academics work with business, government, and/or NGO partners they produce more cited, higher impact research. (2018-12-11)

Oral health effects of tobacco products: Science and regulatory policy proceedings
AADR held the 'Oral Health Effects of Tobacco Products: Science and Regulatory Policy' meeting. The papers resulting from this conference are published in the latest issue of Advances in Dental Research, an e-Supplement to the Journal of Dental Research. (2019-09-20)

The case for economics -- by the numbers
In recent years, criticism has been levelled at economics for being insular and unconcerned about real-world problems. But a new study led by MIT scholars finds that the field increasingly overlaps with the work of other disciplines, and, in a related development, has become more empirical and data-driven, while producing less work of pure theory. (2020-03-03)

Docetaxel given after doxorubicin reduces recurrence
Adding the drug docetaxel to anthracycline-based chemotherapy slightly improved disease-free survival in breast cancer patients, according to a randomized clinical trial published online Jan. 8 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (2008-01-08)

Wikipedia readers get shortchanged by copyrighted material
When Google Books digitized 40 years worth of copyrighted and out-of-copyright issues of Baseball Digest magazine, Wikipedia editors realized they had scored. Suddenly they had access to pages and pages of player information from a new source. Yet not all information could be used equally: citations to out-of-copyright issues increased 135 percent more than issues still subject to copyright restrictions, according to a new UC Berkeley study. (2017-02-13)

Advances in precision oral health research proceedings published in Advances in Dental Research
On November 8-9, 2018 the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) held the '9th AADR Fall Focused Symposium: Advances in Precision Oral Health Research' meeting on the National Institutes of Health (NIH) campus in Bethesda, Maryland, USA. The papers resulting from this symposium are published in the latest issue of Advances in Dental Research, an e-Supplement to the Journal of Dental Research (JDR). (2019-10-22)

Oral implants -- The paradigm shift in restorative dentistry
The discovery of the phenomenon osseointegration has led to the development of oral implants with high clinical performance. In the JDR Centennial article 'Oral Implants -- The Paradigm Shift in Restorative Dentistry,' Niklaus P. Lang, Professor Emeritus, University of Berne, Switzerland, reviews history and progression of dental implants. (2019-10-22)

Bioengineered tooth replacement opens doors to new therapies
Tooth loss is a significant health issue currently affecting millions of people worldwide. Two articles published in the September 2018 issue of the Journal of Dental Research share recent advances in bioengineering teeth. (2018-08-20)

Study finds early career publications as likely source of NIH funding racial gap
In seeking to pinpoint why black or African-American scientists are less likely than their white counterparts to receive National Institutes of Health research funding, a group of researchers has identified early career publications as a likely contributor to the gap. (2018-11-14)

journal of Dental Research centennial featured article: Tooth bioengineering and regene
Over the past 100 years, tremendous progress has been made in the fields of dental tissue engineering and regenerative dental medicine. The October 2019 JDR Centennial article, 'Tooth Bioengineering and Regenerative Dentistry' discusses key successes that have contributed most to current knowledge and understanding of regenerative dentistry. (2019-09-20)

IADR's Women Pioneers: Celebrating a Century of Achievement published in Advances in Dental Research
The latest issue of Advances in Dental Research, an e-Supplement to the Journal of Dental Research (JDR), 'IADR's Women Pioneers: Celebrating a Century of Achievement' highlights the history of the tremendous advancements in dental research made by women, while also identifying areas where the profession needs to continue to grow to be more inclusive in the promotion of women scientific innovators. (2019-11-20)

Immune deficiency linked to a type of eye cancer
The incidence of squamous cell eye cancer is greater among kidney transplant patients and people with human immunodeficiency virus than the general public, which suggests the disease is associated with immune deficiency. (2007-08-14)

Patent mining indicates promising routes for research
Methodology developed by Brazilian scientists uses big data tools, has been validated in an analysis of studies on hemophilia, and can also be used to search for partnerships and technology transfer opportunities. (2018-08-31)

Journal of Dental Research Centennial July 2019: Fluoride Revolution and Dental Caries
While the global epidemic of dental caries that began about 140 years ago was very largely caused by the rise in sugar consumption, the more recent decline in caries during the last 50 years has been due largely to the use of fluoride. (2019-07-08)

Individual macromolecule motion in a crowded living cell
The research article embraces the status of the experimental situation and touches obstacles that still hinder the applications of single molecules in the cellular environment. (2016-02-22)

Scientists stack algorithms to improve predictions of yield-boosting crop traits
To help researchers better predict high-yielding crop traits, a team from the University of Illinois have stacked together six high-powered, machine learning algorithms that are used to interpret hyperspectral data -- and they demonstrated that this technique improved the predictive power of a recent study by up to 15 percent, compared to using just one algorithm. (2019-06-03)

Behavioral sciences in the promotion of oral health
The importance and value of behavioral sciences in dentistry has long been recognized and over time behavioral sciences have expanded our understanding of oral health beyond 'disease' to a broader biopsychosocial concept of oral health. In the JDR Centennial article 'Behavioral Sciences in the Promotion of Oral Health,' Colman McGrath, University of Hong Kong, SAR, China, discusses how this broadened view has led dentistry away from a focus of 'treatment' to oral health 'care.' (2019-11-20)

How to pay top executives if you want them to be innovative
When pay dispersion is perceived as linked to an executive's individual performance (as in variable pay), it's considered legitimate and may promote knowledge-sharing and cooperation among top executives. On the contrary, when pay dispersion is not perceived to depend on individual contribution (as in fixed pay), it ignites a demotivating process of social comparison, detrimental to knowledge sharing and cooperation, according to a study by Bocconi University's Mario Daniele Amore. (2019-02-12)

Study shows how retractions significantly hurt scientists
Life scientists who have published papers that are retracted by journals subsequently suffer a 10 percent drop in citations of their remaining work, compared to similar but unaffected scientists, according to a new study by MIT researchers. (2017-09-06)

Culture not a factor in management styles globally
Geert Hofstede's 'Culture's Consequences' is one of the most influential management books of the 20th century. With well over 80,000 citations, Hofstede argues that 50 percent of managers' differences in their reactions to various situations are explained by cultural differences. Now, a researcher at the University of Missouri has determined that culture plays little or no part in leaders' management of their employees; this finding could impact how managers are trained and evaluated globally. (2016-12-19)

Hyphens in paper titles harm citation counts and journal impact factors
According to the latest research results, the presence of simple hyphens in the titles of academic papers adversely affects the citation statistics, regardless of the quality of the articles. The phenomenon applies to all major subject areas. Thus, citation counts and journal impact factors, commonly used for professorial evaluations in universities worldwide, are unreliable. (2019-05-31)

Integrated space-group and crystal-structure determination
SHELX is a system of nine programs for the solution and refinement of crystal structures against X-ray and neutron diffraction data. (2015-01-08)

Everything you always wanted to know about marketing channels
A handy guide to the much-studied subject of marketing channels that includes definitions, context, key theories, strategies, and analysis, along with many content-rich tables and citations to important literature on virtually all key aspects of the subject. (2015-10-21)

Major cities concentrate less scientific production
The world's major cities, such as New York, London, and Tokyo, are losing their predominant position in the production and circulation of scientific articles, according to a study carried out by the Laboratoire interdisciplinaire solidarités, sociétés, territoires (CNRS/University of Toulouse Jean Jaurès/EHESS/ENSFEA), the INCREASE Federation at the CNRS, and the Centre Marc Bloch in Berlin (CNRS/MEAE). These results are published in the October issue of the journal Scientometrics. (2017-10-11)

Influence of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine jumps 25%
The Journal of Nuclear Medicine again ranks among the top 5 medical imaging journals in the world. JNM continues to lead among nuclear medicine journals, with the highest impact factor (7.354), the highest immediacy index, the highest number of citations, the highest 5-year impact factor, the highest number of citable articles, and the highest influence score. (2019-06-27)

UAHuntsville business faculty investigate research ethics; Results are published in Science magazine
Two UAHuntsville faculty members from the College of Business were published today in the prestigious journal Science for their investigation of an important issue in research ethics. (2012-02-02)

NIH scientists publish new metric to measure the influence of scientific research
A new metric, known as the Relative Citation Ratio (RCR), will allow researchers to measure the influence of a scientific article, regardless of publication and scientific field. While RCR cannot replace expert review, it does overcome many of the issues faced by previous metrics. RCR was developed by scientists with the Office of Portfolio Analysis, Division of Program Coordination, Planning and Strategic Initiatives, part of the National Institutes of Health. (2016-09-06)

Higher frequency of financial reporting hinders corporate innovation
Research shows that more regular financial reporting increases managerial myopia and stifles innovation. (2020-12-03)

'Pedigree is not destiny' when it comes to scholarly success
A new analysis of academic productivity finds researchers' current working environments better predict their future success than the prestige of their doctoral training. (2019-04-29)

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