Popular Cleft Palate News and Current Events

Popular Cleft Palate News and Current Events, Cleft Palate News Articles.
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Samara Polytech geologists discovered the fullest skull of Wetlugasaurus
Traditionally, Petroleum Engineering Faculty staff and students of the Flagship University took part in the annual complex scientific expedition on monitoring the flora of Triassic and Jurassic deposits in the southeast of the Samara region. More than 50 specimens of the Triassic fauna containing amphibians and reptiles' bone fragments were collected. Unique geological material will replenish museum funds and will be used in interactive excursions and events. (2018-08-27)

Face shape is in the genes
Many of the characteristics that make up a person's face, such as nose size and face width, stem from specific genetic variations, reports John Shaffer of the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, and colleagues, in a study published on Aug. 25 in PLOS Genetics. (2016-08-25)

Jurassic crocodile discovery sheds light on reptiles' family tree
A 150 million-year-old fossil has been identified as a previously unseen species of ancient crocodile that developed a tail fin and paddle-like limbs for life in the sea. (2019-04-04)

My, what big teeth you had! Extinct species had large teeth on roof of mouth
Paleontologists have found a previously unknown amphibious predator that probably made the Antarctica of 240 million years ago something less than a hospitable place. (2008-09-11)

Better learning through zinc?
Zinc is a vital micronutrient involved in many cellular processes: For example, in learning and memory processes, it plays a role that is not yet understood. By using nanoelectrochemical measurements, Swedish researchers have made progress toward understanding by demonstrating that zinc influences the release of messenger molecules. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, zinc changes the number of messenger molecules stored in vesicles and the dynamics of their release from the cell. (2017-03-21)

3D-Printed implants shown to help grow 'real bone'
Chemically coated, ceramic implants successfully guided the regrowth of missing bone in lab animals while 'steadily dissolving,' researchers report. (2018-08-01)

Remake, refill, reuse: Recycling at the synapse revealed
OIST Researchers have shown that the speed of neurotransmitter recycling at the synapse is determined by the refilling speed of vesicles. (2018-03-26)

Cause of severe genetic disease identified
Mutations in the p63 protein lead to a number of disorders, but none is as severe as the AEC syndrome. Scientists at Goethe University Frankfurt in collaboration with a research group from the University of Naples Federico II have now discovered that this syndrome resembles diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's or ALS more closely than it does other p63-based syndromes. Their results were recently published in the scientific journal (2018-02-02)

Augmented tongue ultrasound for speech therapy
Researchers have developed a system that can display the movements of our own tongues in real time. These movements are processed by a machine learning algorithm that controls an 'articulatory talking head.' This avatar shows the tongue, palate and teeth, which are usually hidden inside the vocal tract. This (2017-10-13)

Interferon regulatory factor 6 mutations implicated in neural tube defects, including spina bifida
Mutations in a gene known as interferon regulatory factor 6 that cause cleft lip and palate also are implicated in neural tube defects such as spina bifida, suggests research by an international study team published online Jan. 25, 2019, in Human Molecular Genetics. (2019-01-25)

Topiramate in early pregnancy increases risk of oral clefts
A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health suggest that using topiramate in early pregnancy, particularly at the high doses used for epilepsy, increases the risk of oral clefts. Their results are published in Neurology. (2017-12-28)

In-utero treatment reverses cleft palate in mice
Researchers at University of Utah Health clarified a molecular pathway responsible for the formation of cleft palate and identified a new treatment to reverse this defect in mouse pups in utero. (2017-09-13)

Warnings on Anesthesia before age 3 -- plastic surgeons get update on evidence
The evidence behind the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recent drug safety warning regarding prolonged anesthesia in infants and young children is discussed in the October issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). (2017-10-02)

Exposure to air pollution just before or after conception raises risk of birth defects
Women exposed to air pollution just prior to conception or during the first month of pregnancy face an increased risk of their children being born with birth defects, such as cleft lip or palate or abnormal hearts. (2017-12-11)

Novel genome-wide association study risk loci for nonsyndromic orofacial clefts
At the 96th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the IADR Pan European Regional (PER) Congress, Azeez Butali, University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA, gave an oral presentation titled 'Novel Genome-wide Association Study Risk Loci for Nonsyndromic Orofacial Clefts.' (2018-07-27)

Surveys of patients about health care providers are likely of little use
For anyone who has ever taken a survey after a medical appointment and wondered whether the effort was worthwhile, the answer is probably 'No,' says a Baylor University psychologist and researcher. (2018-07-16)

A docking site per calcium channel cluster
In our brain, information is passed from one neuron to the next at a structure called synapse. At a chemical synapse, a chemical is released from the signal-sending neuron or presynaptic neuron. This neurotransmitter then crosses the synaptic cleft to bind to receptors in the target neuron or postsynaptic neuron. An extensive molecular machinery is at work: for example, vesicles filled with neurotransmitter dock at 'docking sites' in the pre-synaptic active zone before they fuse and release the neurotransmitter into the synapse. (2017-06-13)

Ancient amphibian had mouthful of teeth ready to grab you: UTM research
The idea of being bitten by a nearly toothless modern frog or salamander sounds laughable, but their ancient ancestors had a full array of teeth, large fangs and thousands of tiny hook-like structures called denticles on the roofs of their mouths that would snare prey, according to new research by paleontologists at the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM). (2017-09-15)

Older fathers put health of partners, unborn children at risk, Rutgers study finds
Men who delay starting a family have a ticking 'biological clock' -- just like women -- that may affect the health of their partners and children, according to Rutgers researchers. (2019-05-12)

Cost-effective imaging can determine patients' OSA risk and severity
Researchers from the Center for Sleep & Circadian Neurobiology aimed to reproducibly quantify pharyngeal structures by using digital morphometrics based on a laser ruler, and to assess differences between subjects with OSA and control subjects and associations with apnea-hypopnea index. (2017-09-12)

Bulldogs' screw tails linked to human genetic disease
With their small size, stubby faces and wide-set eyes, bulldogs, French bulldogs and Boston terriers are among the most popular of domestic dog breeds. Now researchers at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine have found the genetic basis for these dogs' appearance, and linked it to a rare inherited syndrome in humans. (2019-01-03)

Children with craniofacial defects face most difficult social pressures in grade school
Elementary school children with craniofacial anomalies show the highest levels of anxiety, depression and difficulties in peer interactions when compared to youths with craniofacial defects in middle and high schools. The findings suggest that keeping a close watch for these signs and educating the child's peers about their condition may be necessary for this age group. (2017-09-28)

Genetic profile reveals susceptibility to cleft palate
For the first time, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine have identified a series of genetic mutations that appear to be linked to significant risk for cleft palate and other dental abnormalities. These are devastating conditions that cause tremendous social isolation, and also are associated with decreased lifespan, a higher risk of cancer and increased susceptibility to psychiatric disorders, even after surgical repair. (2008-09-15)

Chinese scientists unlock structural secrets of whale baleen
Chinese scientists working with other researchers have for the first time uncovered the underlying mechanisms of the hierarchical structure of baleen, with an eye toward developing advanced engineered materials. (2018-11-21)

How fever in early pregnancy causes heart, facial birth defects
Researchers have known for decades that fevers in the first trimester of pregnancy increase risk for some heart defects and facial deformities such as cleft lip or palate. Exactly how this happens is unclear. Scientists have debated whether a virus or other infection source causes the defects, or if fever alone is the underlying problem. (2017-10-10)

Signal peptides' novel role in glutamate receptor trafficking and neural synaptic activity
Dr. SHENG Nengyin at the Kunming Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with Dr. SHI Yun's Lab at the Model Animal Research Center of Nanjing University, revealed a signal peptide function for glutamate receptor trafficking and uncovered a novel trafficking mechanism for glutamate receptors. (2018-11-19)

CRISPR screen reveals new targets in more than half of all squamous cell carcinomas
Team of University of Colorado Cancer Center researchers sheds light on p63 activity in squamous cell carcinoma of the lung, providing an actionable path forward to drug development against this known cause of cancer. (2018-09-18)

The tale of the bats, dark matter and a plastic surgeon
What happens when a plastic surgeon meets a bat expert zoologist and a paleobiologist? No, it's not a strange Halloween story about spooky bat dinosaurs but rather, a story about a new discovery about bats which may unlock vital clues about the causes of cleft palate in humans. (2016-10-24)

About face: Special collection of papers celebrates research on how the human face forms
Our faces can reveal a lot about us, and now scientists are revealing a lot about faces. PLOS Genetics announces a special collection of papers to highlight recent advances in our understanding of how faces form, curated by Seth Weinberg of the University of Pittsburgh, and colleagues. The collection, entitled ''Craniofacial genetics: where have we been and where are we going,'' publishes June 22 and features research on the development of the face and skull, facial birth defects and normal facial variation. (2018-06-22)

Mapping a genetic risk
Clinicians and health researchers often look at gene mutation to predict whether a fetus is at risk for a birth defect, or a person is at risk of developing a disease, but these predictions are not always accurate. University of Calgary researchers have discovered an important factor that changes our understanding of the relationship between gene mutations (genotype) and how they present in people (phenotype) that may, one day, help to improve this accuracy. (2018-03-07)

Does dosing of drug for mom make a difference for baby's risk of cleft lip, palate?
Taking a higher dose of topiramate during the first three months of pregnancy may increase a baby's risk of cleft lip or cleft palate more than when taking a lower dose, according to a study published in the Dec. 27, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2017-12-27)

Plastic and reconstructive surgery ... in brief
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery ... in Brief is distributed monthly and designed to keep you updated on the most current scientific news from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. (2009-02-27)

Babies need free tongue movement to decipher speech sounds
Inhibiting infants' tongue movements impedes their ability to distinguish between speech sounds, researchers with the University of British Columbia have found. The study is the first to discover a direct link between infants' oral-motor movements and auditory speech perception. (2015-10-12)

A Fox code for the face
In the developing face, how do stem cells know whether to become cartilage, bones or teeth? To begin to answer this question, scientists from the USC Stem Cell laboratory of Gage Crump tested the role of a key family of genes, called 'Forkhead-domain transcription factors,' or Fox. Their findings appear in the journal Development. (2018-06-26)

Cockroach gardeners: Spreading plant seeds across the forest floor
Researchers in Japan have discovered that cockroaches can disperse seeds like birds and mammals. A variety of seed dispersing animals had been identified, including birds, monkeys, ants, and even slugs, but no cockroaches. This unexpected discovery was made during a study of the seed dispersal mechanism of Monotropastrum humile, a small herb that thrives in the same temperate forests of Japan that the Blattella nipponica cockroach inhabits. (2017-08-02)

Discovery lights path for Alzheimer's research
A metallic probe invented at Rice University that lights up when it binds to a misfolded amyloid beta peptide has identified a binding site that could facilitate better drugs to treat Alzheimer's disease. When the probe is illuminated, it catalyzes oxidation of the protein in a way that might keep it from aggregating in the brains of patients. (2017-10-19)

Uncontrolled asthma attacks during pregnancy increase health risks for mothers and babies
Women with asthma who suffer severe symptoms while they are pregnant face higher risks of health problems both for themselves and their babies compared to women with well-controlled asthma, according to research published in the European Respiratory Journal. (2019-11-26)

Blueprint for the skull
Once upon a time in Europe, pregnant women avoided rabbits to prevent their babies from being born with a 'harelip.' But, that isn't the only misconception about the condition now known as cleft lip. In the May 1 issue of Cell Reports, UConn Health researchers report the popular modern belief that the condition is caused by a gene is wrong. Their research could transform how we understand the formation of the face. (2018-05-01)

In the gaping mouth of ancient crocodiles
A new study by a team of international experts, led by University of Witwatersrand PhD candidate Kathleen Dollman and Professor Jonah Choiniere published today in the American Museum Novitates, endeavoured to further explore the mouth of one of the earliest occurring and least understood groups of crocodilians, the shartegosuchids. (2018-06-18)

New technique uses umbilical cord stem cells for early repair of cleft palate
A technique using umbilical cord blood stem cells could be a promising new approach for repair of cleft palate in infants, reports a paper in The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2018-10-02)

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