Popular Cocaine News and Current Events

Popular Cocaine News and Current Events, Cocaine News Articles.
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Psychostimulants play a major role in fatal strokes among young adults
An estimated 76 million people use psychostimulants, which include illicit drugs such as methamphetamine, cocaine, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, as well as prescription stimulants. A new Journal of Forensic Sciences study from Australia is the first to present national data of psychostimulant use in young adults who experienced a fatal stroke. (2019-04-03)

Traumatic childhood may increase the risk of drug addiction
Previous research has shown that personality traits such as impulsivity or compulsiveness are indicators of an increased risk of addiction. Now, new research from the University of Cambridge suggests that these impulsive and compulsive personality traits are also associated with a traumatic upbringing during childhood. The study was published today, 31 August, in the journal American Journal Psychiatry. (2012-08-31)

One in 10 people have traces of cocaine or heroin on their fingerprints
Scientists have found that drugs are now so prevalent that 13 percent of those taking part in a test were found to have traces of class A drugs on their fingerprints -- despite never using them. (2018-03-22)

'NarcoLogic' computer model shows unintended consequences of cocaine interdiction
Efforts to curtail the flow of cocaine into the United States from South America have made drug trafficking operations more widespread and harder to eradicate. (2019-04-02)

'Chemsex' needs to become a public health priority
Chemsex -- sex under the influence of illegal drugs -- needs to become a public health priority, argue experts in The BMJ this week. (2015-11-03)

Research reveals why some smokers become addicted with their first cigarette
Research from the University of Western Ontario reveals how the brain processes the (2008-08-05)

Researchers discover key link between mitochondria and cocaine addiction
Scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine identified significant mitochondrial changes that take place in cocaine addiction, and they have been able to block them. (2017-12-20)

Cocaine's effects on brain metabolism may contribute to abuse
A new study conducted at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory suggests that cocaine's effects go beyond the dopamine system. (2008-02-18)

Study: One-third of young adults have ridden with an impaired driver
A new study led by a Colorado State University researcher indicates that riding with an impaired driver is prevalent among emerging adults, with 33 percent of recent high school grads reporting the risky behavior at least once in the previous year. (2018-03-19)

How exercise could help fight drug addiction
The siren call of addictive drugs can be hard to resist, and returning to the environment where drugs were previously taken can make resistance that much harder. However, addicts who exercise appear to be less vulnerable to the impact of these environmental cues. Now, research with mice suggests that exercise might strengthen a drug user's resolve by altering the production of peptides in the brain, according to a study in the journal ACS Omega. (2018-11-14)

Women's hormones play role in drug addiction, higher relapse rates
Female-specific interventions are needed, but in the meantime, treatment centers could use this study to educate women about their stronger mental connections to places and objects. (2019-02-08)

Evidence of drug use in mothers of babies with NAS -- but also in control group mothers
Researchers conducting a study of newborns experiencing symptoms of drug withdrawal knew the infants' mothers would test positive for substance use. But in the course of their study they had another, surprising finding: They discovered that 1 in 4 women enrolled in the 'drug-free' comparison group, whose infants were not diagnosed with neonatal abstinence syndrome, also tested positive for illicit drug use. (2017-09-15)

Alcohol makes rats more vulnerable to compulsive cocaine use
Rats given alcohol for 10 days prior to cocaine exhibited enhanced cocaine-addiction behavior, including continuing to seek cocaine despite receiving a brief electric shock when they did so, a new study reports. (2017-11-01)

MDMA users more empathetic than other drug users
Long-term MDMA users have higher levels of empathy than cannabis and other drugs users, new research suggests. (2019-02-08)

First large scale study of cocaine users leads to breakthrough in drug testing
Scientists from the University of Surrey have developed a rapid and highly sensitive fingerprint test that can take just seconds to confirm whether someone has used cocaine. (2017-09-22)

University of Guelph researchers uncover why environmental cues make drug addiction extra hard to beat
Besides triggering the brain's emotional and stimulus-response systems, environmental cues activate areas where memories are processed, according to this University of Guelph study. Prompting these memory processing systems makes it extra difficult to counter addiction because the classic stimulus-response mechanisms are reinforced by the memory effects of environmental drug cues. While this double effect makes it hard to treat drug abuse, this finding may offer a way to use cues to improve cognitive behavioural therapy. (2019-02-27)

Alcohol and tobacco are by far the biggest threat to human welfare of all addictive drugs
A new review published online today in the journal Addiction has compiled the best, most up-to-date source of information on alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use and the burden of death and disease. It shows that in 2015 alcohol and tobacco use between them cost the human population more than a quarter of a billion disability-adjusted life years, with illicit drugs costing a further tens of millions. (2018-05-11)

A potential new weapon in the addiction battle: FDA-approved diabetes and obesity drugs
Research from the University of Pennsylvania reveals that FDA-approved drugs to treat diabetes and obesity may reduce cocaine relapse and help people who are addicted break the habit. Such medications work by targeting receptors for glucagon-like peptide 1, a hormone in the brain. (2018-04-27)

People are more likely to try drugs for the first time during the summer
American teenagers and adults are more likely to try illegal or recreational drugs for the first time in the summer, a new study shows. (2019-07-23)

Cannabis consumption increases violent behaviour in young people in psychiatric care
A new study on cannabis use that involved 1,136 patients (from 18 to 40 years of age) with mental illnesses who had been seen five times during the year after discharge from a psychiatric hospital demonstrates that sustained used of cannabis is associated with an increase in violent behaviour in young people. Moreover, the association between persistent cannabis use and violence is stronger than that associated with alcohol or cocaine. (2017-10-06)

Potential new treatment for drug addiction relapse revealed
Research published in Addiction Biology by scientists at the University of Bath reveals a new potential mechanism for combatting drug addiction relapse. (2018-06-12)

Most reproductive-age women using opioids also use another substance
The majority of reproductive-age and pregnant women who use opioids for non-medical purposes also use at least one other substance, ranging from nicotine or alcohol to cocaine, according to a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health analysis. It was the first to look at use of multiple substances in a nationally representative group of US women age 18 to 44. (2017-06-30)

Drugs used to enhance sexual experiences, especially in UK
Combining drugs with sex is common regardless of gender or sexual orientation, reveals new research by UCL and the Global Drug Survey into global trends of substance-linked sex. The findings, published today in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, revealed that alcohol, cannabis, MDMA and cocaine are the drugs most commonly combined with sex. (2019-04-01)

Cocaine and ecstasy detected in waters of the L'Albufera in Valencia
The water in the canals and irrigation channels in the L'Albufera Natural Park in Valencia contain cocaine, ecstasy and a further six drugs. This has been confirmed by a study carried out by researchers from the University of Valencia, who have issued a warning about the continued presence of these substances on wildlife and human health. (2010-09-22)

'Narco-deforestation' study links loss of Central American tropical forests to cocaine
Central American tropical forests are beginning to disappear at an alarming rate, threatening the livelihood of indigenous peoples there and endangering some of the most biologically diverse ecosystems in North America. The culprit? Cocaine. (2017-05-16)

Emergency departments administering more medications through the nose
Administering medications through the nose as an alternative to injections or IVs is becoming increasingly popular in emergency departments and ambulances, according to a paper by Loyola Medicine pharmacists. The intranasal route 'is easy, fast and noninvasive,' emergency department pharmacist Megan A. Rech, Pharm.D., M.S., and colleagues write in the journal Annals of Emergency Medicine. (2017-04-18)

Setting affects pleasure of heroin and cocaine
Drug users show substance-specific differences in the rewarding effects of heroin versus cocaine depending on where they use the drugs, according to a study published in JNeurosci. Considering this interaction between drug type and location in the treatment of addiction could help to prevent relapse. (2018-05-14)

Psychedelic drug use associated with reduced partner violence in men
In a new study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, researchers from UBC's Okanagan campus have discovered that men who have used psychedelic drugs in the past have a lower likelihood of engaging in violence against their intimate partners. (2018-06-05)

Cell-type specific mechanism for formation and retrieval of cocaine-associated memories
A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University has revealed neuronal mechanisms underlying the formation and retrieval of cocaine use-associated memories. Their research sheds light on how drug addiction develops and reveals pathways that can be exploited for the development of strategies to treat cocaine addiction. (2019-04-15)

Realistic rodent model of drug addiction
Drug addiction may not require a habitual relationship with a substance, suggests findings from a new model of cocaine administration in rats that better captures the human experience of obtaining and using drugs. The research, published in JNeurosci, represents a step towards a translational animal model of addiction that challenges widely held views about drug users. (2017-11-20)

Non-psychoactive cannabis ingredient could help addicts stay clean
A preclinical study in rats has shown that there might be value in using a non-psychoactive and non-addictive ingredient of the Cannabis sativa plant to reduce the risk of relapse among recovering drug and alcohol addicts. The study's findings inform the ongoing debate about the possible medical benefits of non-psychoactive cannabinoids. So says Friedbert Weiss, leader of an investigative team at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California, in Neuropsychopharmacology published by Springer Nature. (2018-03-23)

Unexpected results suggest a few joints may not harm men's sperm
Researchers investigating the effect of cannabis smoking on men's testicular function have made the unexpected discovery that it is linked to higher sperm counts and higher testosterone levels among moderate users compared to men who never smoked it. The study is published in Human Reproduction. (2019-02-05)

Study may help prevent relapse in cocaine use disorder patients
Brazilian researchers combined cognitive dysfunction tests with an analysis of drug use patterns to identify patients at high risk of relapse after treatment. (2019-05-16)

LGBQ teens more likely than peers to use dangerous drugs
Lesbian, gay, bisexual or questioning (LGBQ) teens are at substantially higher risk of substance use than their heterosexual peers, according to a new study led by San Diego State University researchers and published in the American Journal of Public Health. (2018-07-12)

Cicardian system suffers and protects from prenatal cocaine exposure
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine have shown that prenatal cocaine exposure in zebrafish (which share the majority of the same genes with humans) can alter neuronal development and acutely dysregulate the expression of circadian genes and those affecting melatonin signaling, growth and neurotransmission. The circadian factors, including the principal circadian hormone melatonin, can attenuate the prenatal effects of cocaine. These findings appear in the July 11 issue of the journal PLoS ONE. (2007-07-10)

Young people are intentionally taking drink and drugs for better sex
Teenagers and young adults across Europe drink and take drugs as part of deliberate sexual strategies. Findings published today in BioMed Central's open access journal, BMC Public Health, reveal that a third of 16-35 year old males and a quarter of females surveyed are drinking alcohol to increase their chances of sex, while cocaine, ecstasy and cannabis are intentionally used to enhance sexual arousal or prolong sex. (2008-05-08)

Chronic cocaine use modifies gene expression
Chronic cocaine use changes gene expression in the hippocampus, according to research in mice recently published in JNeurosci. (2019-09-02)

Team creates novel vaccine that produces strong immunity against cocaine high
Researchers from The Scripps Research Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College, and Cornell University have produced a long-lasting anti-cocaine immunity in mice by giving them a unique vaccine that combines bits of the common cold virus with a particle that mimics cocaine. (2011-01-04)

Do we need to reform international drug treaties as more countries legalize cannabis?
The future of international drug control treaties is in doubt because of recent treaty-violating decisions to legalize cannabis use in Canada, the United States and Uruguay. Professor Wayne Hall, whose 2014 review of 20 years of cannabis research made world headlines, thinks so. If decriminalization is the way of the future, Hall advocates a cautious approach to policy reform that would involve trialing and evaluating the effects of incrementally more liberal drug policies. (2017-09-08)

Opioid abuse leads to heroin use and a hepatitis C epidemic, USC researcher says
Heroin is worse than other drugs because people inject it much sooner, potentially resulting in increased risk of injection-related epidemics such as hepatitis C and HIV, a Keck School of Medicine of USC study shows. As more people use opioids, many switch to heroin because it's more potent and cheaper - a trend that complicates disease prevention as health officials crack down on opioids. (2018-02-22)

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