Popular Coco Bonds News and Current Events

Popular Coco Bonds News and Current Events, Coco Bonds News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Building stronger health systems could help prevent the next epidemic in Madagascar
The peak epidemic season for plague in Madagascar is fast approaching and the severity of these outbreaks could be significantly reduced with improvements to their public health system, argues Matthew Bonds from Harvard Medical School and the nongovernmental health care organization, PIVOT, in a new Viewpoint publishing Jan. 4, 2018, in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. (2018-01-04)

A painless adhesive
Pulling off a Band-Aid may soon get a lot less painful. Researchers from Harvard and Xi'an Jiaotong University in China have developed a new type of adhesive that can strongly adhere wet materials -- such as hydrogel and living tissue -- and be easily detached with a specific frequency of light. The adhesives could be used to attach and painlessly detach wound dressings, transdermal drug delivery devices, and wearable robotics. (2018-12-14)

Polymer reversibly glows white when stretched
Polymers that change their appearance in response to mechanical forces can warn of damage developing in a material before the stress causes structural failure. Researchers now report in ACS Central Science that they've developed a first-of-its-kind elastic polymer blend that displays white fluorescence when deformed and then goes dark after relaxing back to its original shape. (2019-04-24)

The science behind the fizz: How the bubbles make the beverage
From popping a bottle of champagne for a celebration to cracking open a soda while watching the Super Bowl, everyone is familiar with fizz. But little is known about the chemistry behind the bubbles. Now, one group sheds some light on how carbonation can affect the creaminess and smoothness of beverages, as reported in ACS' The Journal of Physical Chemistry B. (2018-01-31)

The fast dance of electron spins
Metal complexes show a fascinating behavior in their interactions with light, which for example is utilized in organic light emitting diodes, solar cells, quantum computers, or even in cancer therapy. In many of these applications, the electron spin, a kind of inherent rotation of the electrons, plays an important role. Sebastian Mai and Leticia González from the University of Vienna succeeded in simulating the extremely fast spin flip processes that are triggered by the light absorption of metal complexes. (2019-10-04)

Why musical training benefits us in processing speech
A brain imaging study by Dr. DU Yi from the Institute of Psychology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and her collaborator Dr. Zatorre Robert from the Montréal Neurological Institute and McGill University has revealed that musical training might improve speech perception in noisy environments via enhanced neural foundation in bottom-up auditory encoding, top-down speech motoric prediction, and cross-modal auditory-motor integration. (2017-12-04)

New record set for carbon-carbon single bond length
A stable organic compound has been synthesized with a record length for the bond between its carbon atoms, exceeding the assumed limit. (2018-03-08)

Hydrogen bonds directly detected for the first time
For the first time, scientists have succeeded in studying the strength of hydrogen bonds in a single molecule using an atomic force microscope. Researchers from the University of Basel's Swiss Nanoscience Institute network have reported the results in the journal Science Advances. (2017-05-12)

UChicago scientists craft world's tiniest interlinking chains
For decades, scientists have been trying to make a true molecular chain: a repeated set of tiny rings interlocked together. In a study in Science published online Nov. 30, University of Chicago researchers announced the first confirmed method to craft such a molecular chain. (2017-12-06)

The ultimate green technology
Imagine patterning and visualizing silicon at the atomic level, something which, if done successfully, will revolutionize the quantum and classical computing industry. A team of scientists in Edmonton, Canada has done just that, led by a world-renowned physicist and his up-and-coming protégé. (2017-02-13)

Adding hydrogen to graphene
IBS researchers report a fundamental study of how graphene is hydrogenated. (2016-11-03)

Bitcoin crash could derail other cryptocurrencies
A sharp fall in the value of Bitcoin may cause other cryptocurrencies to crash, but is unlikely to have a significant impact on traditional assets, according to new research published in the journal Economics Letters. (2018-02-08)

We feel connected when we move together in time with music
Go dancing! A new study conduted at Center for Music in the Brain at Aarhus University, Denmark, suggest that then moving together with music, synchronous movements between individuals increase social closeness. (2020-06-26)

Biophysics: Bacterial adhesion in vitro and in silico
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich researchers have characterized the physical mechanism that enables a widespread bacterial pathogen to adhere to the tissues of its human host. (2018-03-29)

'Tricking' bacteria into hydroxylating benzene
Researchers at Nagoya University used bacteria to convert benzene into phenol. They developed 'decoy' molecules -- modified amino acids -- mimicking the native substrates of a genetically expressed oxygenase enzyme. When absorbed by live E.coli cells, the decoys were misrecognized as substrates of the oxygenase, which became activated. The bacteria then oxidized a supplied benzene source, needing only glucose as fuel. (2018-06-11)

New method to overcome multiple drug resistant diseases developed by Stanford researchers
Many drugs once considered Charles Atlases of the pharmaceutical realm have been reduced to the therapeutic equivalent of 97-pound weaklings as the diseases they once dispatched with ease have developed resistance to them. But researchers at Stanford University have developed a method to get around one of the most common forms of resistance, thereby opening up some if not many resistant diseases to the reinvigorated fury of the medications that once laid them low. (2008-08-18)

RUDN University chemists suggest a new way to synthesize steroid analogs
Scientists from RUDN University and the Ivan Franko National University of Lviv have found a way to produce aromatic rings in organic compounds in three stages. These stages proceed successively in one-pot conditions and at room temperature. Now analogues of hormones, steroids, some sugars, terpenes and other complex organic substances can be synthesized faster and at softer conditions. The paper was published in Tetrahedron Letters. (2017-11-15)

Water, water -- the two types of liquid water
There are two types of liquid water, according to research carried out by an international scientific collaboration. This new peculiarity adds to the growing list of strange phenomena in what we imagine is a simple substance. The discovery could have implications for making and using nanoparticles as well as in understanding how proteins fold into their working shape in the body or misfold to cause diseases such as Alzheimer's or CJD. (2016-11-10)

Bound by blood
After studying vampire bat relationships in captivity, researchers at the Smithsonian in Panama released the bats into the wild colony where they originally came from. Using proximity sensors, they discovered that bats stayed close to the same individuals from their captive roost. (2019-10-31)

Outperforming nature's water filtration ability with nanotubes
At just the right size, carbon nanotubes can filter water with better efficiency than biological proteins, a new study reveals. (2017-08-24)

Breaking the chain: Catalyzing a green future for chemistry
Osaka University researchers create catalyst for refining chemicals in plant waste, allowing a green way to produce valuable raw materials. (2017-11-06)

Osaka chemists build new chemical structures on unreactive bonds
Osaka University organic chemists transform strong carbon fluorine bonds into crowded quaternary carbon centers with cobalt catalyzed Grignard chemistry. (2017-07-26)

Green material for refrigeration identified
Researchers from the UK and Spain have identified an eco-friendly solid that could replace the inefficient and polluting gases used in most refrigerators and air conditioners. (2019-04-18)

Interstellar molecules inspire new transformations
When illuminating with LED light, chemists at ICIQ generated carbynes, a highly reactive chemical species that allowed them to modify drugs like anticancer paclitaxel, antidepressant duloxetine and NSAID ibuprofen. The study, led by young chemist Marcos García-Suero, just published in Nature. (2018-01-31)

Successful synthesis of gamma-lactam rings from hydrocarbons
IBS scientists have designed a novel strategy to synthesize ring-shaped cyclic molecules, highly sought-after by pharmaceutical and chemical industries, and known as gamma-lactams. This study describes how these five-membered rings can be prepared from inexpensive and readily available feedstock hydrocarbons, as well as from complex organic molecules, such as amino acids and steroids. (2018-03-01)

Orphaned elephants' social lives substantially altered by poaching
Colorado State University researchers found that orphaned elephants have less access to mature, dominant individuals than non-orphaned elephants, whose dominant social partners are their mothers and aunts. (2017-10-31)

2-D Electronics' metal or semiconductor? Both
IBS researchers produced the first 2-D field-effect transistor (FET) made of a single material. (2017-09-18)

Scientists identify a key mechanism regulating a protein required for muscle and heart function
Scientists at the CNIC and Columbia University have identified a new mechanism regulating the elasticity of titin, a protein with important roles in the function of skeletal and heart muscle. (2018-01-12)

New core-shell catalyst for ethanol fuel cells
Scientists at Brookhaven Lab and the University of Arkansas have developed a highly efficient catalyst for extracting electrical energy from ethanol, an easy-to-store liquid fuel that can be generated from renewable resources. The catalyst steers the electro-oxidation of ethanol down an ideal chemical pathway that releases the liquid fuel's full potential of stored energy. (2019-06-07)

Clarifying how lithium ions ferry around in rechargeable batteries
IBS scientists observe the real-time ultrafast bonding of lithium ions with the solvents, in the same process that happens during charging and discharging of lithium batteries, and conclude that a new theory is needed. (2017-03-27)

Generation of a stable biradical
The world of chemistry has witnessed another step forward: researchers at the University of Würzburg in Germany have succeeded in twisting molecules so much that their double bonds have been completely destroyed. The result: unusually stable biradicals. (2018-03-22)

For Americans, understanding money eases old age anxiety
A new household economics study from Hiroshima University suggests that financially literate people are more capable of accumulating wealth and worrying less about life in old age. (2018-02-01)

Seeking a better way to design drugs
With a three-year, $346,000 award from the National Institutes of Health, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Led by Marion Emmert, Ph.D., will seek to advance the development of a chemical process that could significantly improve the ability to design new pharmaceuticals and streamline the manufacturing of existing drugs. The early-stage technology may yield a more efficient and predictable way of bonding aromatic and benzylic amines to a drug molecule. (2015-09-23)

Breaking local symmetry: Why water freezes but silica forms a glass
University of Tokyo researchers simulated water and silica at low temperature. Despite structural similarities, the two liquids act differently when they are cooled: water freezes into ice, while silica continues to supercool, and eventually forms a glass. This arises from poor symmetry-breaking in silica; although atoms arrange properly in the first shell in both liquids, local rotational symmetry is harder to break in the second shell in silica, because of the less directional Si-O bonds. (2018-02-13)

New catalyst for making fuels from shale gas
Methane in shale gas can be turned into hydrocarbon fuels using an innovative platinum and copper alloy catalyst, according to new research led by UCL (University College London) and Tufts University. (2018-01-08)

Diverse natural fatty acids follow 'Golden Mean'
Bioinformatics scientists at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena (Germany) have discovered that the number of theoretically possible fatty acids with the same chain length but different structures can be determined with the aid of the famous Fibonacci sequence. As they explain in Scientific Reports, the number of possible fatty acids with increasing chain length rises at each step by a factor of approximately 1.618, and therefore agrees with what is called the 'Golden Mean.' (2017-01-27)

A less hazardous means to create phosphorus compounds
Scientists have identified a precursor that helps convert phosphorus into a range of useful compounds, all the while bypassing the need for hazardous intermediate substances that have been conventionally required for such reactions. (2018-02-08)

Deducing the properties of a new form of diamond
Earlier this year, amorphous diamond was synthesized for the first time using a technique involving high pressures, moderately high temperatures and a tiny amount of glassy carbon as starting material. A father-son team at Clemson University has now successfully calculated a number of basic physical properties for this new substance, including elastic constants and related quantities. The results are reported this week in Applied Physics Letters. (2017-11-30)

Artificial bio-inspired membranes for water filtration
Access to clean drinking water is considered to be one of the main challenges of the 21st century, and scientists have just opened a path to new filtration processes. Inspired by cellular proteins, they have developed membranes with asymmetric artificial channels in the interior, from which they were able to observe 'chiral' water. Chirality is a property that favors the flow of materials that are indispensable to filtration. (2018-03-26)

From C-H to C-C at room temperature
By oxidizing the iridium center of the reaction intermediate, IBS scientists achieve arylation of C-H bonds at mild conditions. (2017-12-27)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.