Popular Coffee News and Current Events

Popular Coffee News and Current Events, Coffee News Articles.
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Study shows high phenolic acid intake -- associated with a healthy diet -- is associated with reduced breast cancer risk
New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Glasgow, Scotland (April 28-May 1) shows that a high intake of phenolic acids -- associated with a healthy diet -- is associated with a decreased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. The study is by Andrea Romanos Nanclares, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain, and colleagues. (2019-04-30)

Mathematical model reveals solution to sloshing coffee
Americans drink an average of 3.1 cups of coffee per day; for many people, the popular beverage is a morning necessity. When commuters rush out the door with coffee in hand, chances are their hastiness causes some of the hot liquid to slosh out of the cup. In a recent paper in SIAM Review, authors use surprisingly simple mathematics to develop a model for such sloshing. (2017-12-21)

Smartly containing the cloud increases computing efficiency, says first-of-its-kind study
Virginia Tech researchers discovered ways to further improve computing efficiency using management tools for cloud-based light-weight virtual machine replacements called containers. (2018-02-06)

Cheeseburger or salad? How music volume impacts your decision
Ambient music played in restaurants plays a major role in whether you order a healthy or unhealthy meal. (2018-05-23)

Mediterranean-style diet improves gut microbial diversity and reduces hospitalization
ILC 2018: Diets rich in vegetables, fermented milk products, tea, coffee and chocolate may improve outcomes in patients with liver cirrhosis. (2018-04-12)

The coffee cannabis connection
Coffee affects your metabolism in dozens of other ways besides waking you up, including your metabolism of neurotransmitters typically linked to cannabis, a study reports. The neurotransmitters related to the endocannabinoid system -- the same ones affected by cannabis -- decreased after drinking four to eight cups of coffee in a day. That's the opposite of what occurs after someone uses cannabis. The study also gives possible insight in the cause of munchies. Coffee may also increase the elimination of steroids. (2018-03-15)

Researchers simulate privacy leaks in functional genomics studies
In a study publishing November 12 in the journal Cell, a team of investigators demonstrates that it's possible to de-identify raw functional genomics data to ensure patient privacy. They also demonstrate how these raw data could be linked back to specific individuals through their gene variants by something as simple as an abandoned coffee cup if these sanitation measures are not put in place. (2020-11-12)

Can chocolate, tea, coffee and zinc help make you more healthy?
Ageing and a low life expectancy are caused, at least partly, by oxidative stress. A team of researchers led by Prof. Dr. Ivana Ivanovi-Burmazovi from the Chair of Bioinorganic Chemistry at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), together with researchers from the USA, have discovered that zinc can activate an organic molecule, helping to protect against oxidative stress. (2018-11-02)

Higher coffee consumption associated with lower risk of death
Higher coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of death, according to research presented today at ESC Congress.1 The observational study in nearly 20 000 participants suggests that coffee can be part of a healthy diet in healthy people. (2017-08-27)

Solid research leads physicists to propose new state of matter
The term 'superfluid quasicrystal' sounds like something a comic-book villain might use to carry out his dastardly plans. In reality, it's a new form of matter proposed by theoretical physicists at The University of Texas at Dallas in a recent study published in the journal Physical Review Letters. Their study also describes a 'recipe' for making the exotic materials in the lab. (2018-04-09)

Non-toxic filamentous virus helps quickly dissipate heat generated by electronic devices
The researcher team of Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) discovered that the film constructed by assembling a nontoxic filamentous virus functions as a heat dissipation material, and that can be simply prepared by drying the virus aqueous solution at room temperature. This discovery is expected to elucidate the mechanism of new heat transport in electronics. (2018-04-03)

Energy drinks can negatively impact health of youth
Over half of Canadian youth and young adults who have consumed energy drinks have experienced negative health effects as a result, according to a study from the University of Waterloo. (2018-01-15)

Pesticides give bees a hard time
Scientists from the University of Würzburg have investigated the impact of a new pesticide on the honeybee. In high doses, it has a negative impact on the insects' taste and cognition ability. (2018-04-05)

Birds and beans: Study shows best coffee for bird diversity
It's an age-old debate for coffee lovers. Which is better: Arabica beans with their sweeter, softer taste, or the bold, deep flavor of Robusta beans? A new study by WCS, Princeton University, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison appearing in the journal Scientific Reports has taken the question to unlikely coffee aficionados: birds. (2018-02-16)

The secret behind a choice cuppa or a perfect pint -- a mathematician
Professor William Lee shows how the science of math can aid the profits of industry. (2018-04-13)

How often do quantum systems violate the second law of thermodynamics?
The likelihood of seeing quantum systems violating the second law of thermodynamics has been calculated by UCL scientists. (2016-10-25)

Is a cup of tea really the answer to everything -- even anthrax?
A cup of black tea could be the next line of defense in the threat of bio-terrorism according to new international research. A new study by an international team of researchers from Cardiff University and University of Maryland has revealed how the humble cup of tea could well be an antidote to Bacillus anthracis -- more commonly know as anthrax. (2008-03-12)

Exploring the ground truth: NASA's twin study investigates metabolites
Stanford University School of Medicine Postdoctoral Fellow Tejaswini Mishra, Ph.D., is integrating multi-omics data for NASA's Twins Study and comparing all the metabolites in retired twin astronauts Scott and Mark Kelly. She saw a number of Scott's metabolites increase in levels when he went to space and when he returned to Earth some of those stayed elevated. By integrating data from other Twins Study investigations, she hopes they can determine the cause of this elevation. (2017-08-24)

Microbes help make the coffee
When it comes to processing coffee beans, longer fermentation times can result in better taste, contrary to conventional wisdom. Lactic acid bacteria play an important, positive role in this process. Other species of microbes may play a role in this process as well, but more research is needed to better understand their role. The research is published Feb. 1 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. (2019-02-01)

Two compounds in coffee may team up to fight Parkinson's
Rutgers scientists have found a compound in coffee that may team up with caffeine to fight Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia -- two progressive and currently incurable diseases associated with brain degeneration. (2018-12-10)

Moths with a nose for learning
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health, the Chinese University of Hong Kong and NIST have discovered that when training insects, the process of building associations is not a simple matter of strengthening connections through reinforcement. Understanding how associations are built between stimuli and behavior gives insight into the nature of learning and could inform the design of artificial (2008-10-02)

Wild coffee plants, Christmas trees and chocolate's tree are surprisingly poorly protected
An indicator to measure plant conservation shows a wide range of wild plants used for food, medicine, shelter, fuel, livestock forage and other valuable purposes are at risk. These include wild populations of firs used for Christmas trees, the original types of kitchen-cupboard staples like vanilla, chamomile, cacao and cinnamon, wild relatives of crops like coffee, and non-cultivated plants used by bees to make honey. (2018-11-21)

Shade trees can protect coffee crops
The use of shade trees in coffee plantations is declining, but evidence suggests the trend may make the crop more susceptible to extremes of temperature and precipitation that are likely to become more frequent with climate change. The traditional technique is more effective in marginal production areas, but further studies are needed to determine where it could be advantageous. (2008-10-01)

Increased overweight in children of mothers who drank coffee while pregnant
A study published in the BMJ Open journal shows that even moderate coffee consumption during pregnancy, one to two cups per day, is related to a risk of overweight or obesity in school age children. It has not been clearly shown if caffeine is the direct cause of the overweight, but the relationship, alone, has caused researchers to encourage increased caution. (2018-05-11)

Scientists identify foods that fight disease
Nutrition 2018 will feature the latest research into how adding certain foods to our diet might help lower risk for diabetes, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and other health issues. (2018-06-10)

Study reveals that italian adolescents are heavy consumers of caffeine
More than three-quarters (76 percent) of Italian adolescents who completed anonymous questionnaires consumed caffeine on a daily basis and nearly half (46 percent) exceeded the upper limits recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics. The findings are published in Acta Paediatrica. (2018-03-07)

Substance in coffee delays onset of diabetes in laboratory mice
In recent years, researchers have identified substances in coffee that could help quash the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. But few of these have been tested in animals. Now in study appearing in ACS' Journal of Natural Products, scientists report that one of these previously untested compounds appears to improve cell function and insulin sensitivity in laboratory mice. The finding could spur the development of new drugs to treat or even prevent the disease. (2017-09-06)

Study links chocolate production to increased deforestation in poor nations
In newly published research, Mark Noble, visiting assistant professor of sociology and anthropology at Lehigh, focuses on the link between cocoa exports and deforestation in developing nations. (2017-10-17)

'Coffee filter' helps make new cancer drug Z-endoxifen 1000 times cheaper
Making drugs cheaper doesn't always require pricey investments. A joint initiative by researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology, the Dutch company Syncom BV and the Antoni van Leeuwenhoek hospital proves just that. What started out as a Bachelor project laid the foundation for a much cheaper production of the promising cancer drug Z-endoxifen. (2018-04-05)

Coffee helps teams work together, study suggests
Good teamwork begins with a cup of coffee for everyone, a new study suggests. Researchers found that people gave more positive reviews for their group's performance on a task -- and their own contribution -- if they drank caffeinated coffee beforehand. A second study showed that people talked more in a group setting under the influence of caffeinated coffee -- but they also were more on-topic than those who drank decaf. (2018-06-05)

Study tallies extra calories Americans consume in their coffee, tea
More than 160 million people in the US drink coffee or tea on a regular basis, and many of them use sugar, cream, flavored syrups or other calorie-laden additives in their drinks of choice. A new analysis reveals just how much Americans are adding to their caloric intake by spicing up or sweetening their coffee or tea. (2017-01-30)

To reduce postoperative pain, consider sleep -- and caffeine
A new preclinical study found that a brief period of extended wakefulness before surgery enhances pain and prolongs recovery time after surgery. Caffeine administration helped to reduce the harmful effects of sleep loss on subsequent surgical pain. (2017-08-18)

K-State professor's research suggests that cigarettes' power may not be in nicotine itself
K-State professor's research suggests that cigarettes' power may not be in nicotine itself but in how it enhances other experiences while smoking. (2008-09-03)

New antbird species discovered in Peru by LSU ornithologists
LSU describes a distinctive new species of antbird from humid montane forest of the Cordillera Azul, Martin Region, Peru. (2017-12-14)

A rose is a rose is a rose: Mathematical model explains how two brains agree on smells
Columbia scientists have discovered why the brain's olfactory system is so remarkably consistent between individuals, even though the wiring of brain cells in this region differs greatly from person to person. To make sense of this apparent paradox, the researchers developed a computational model showing that two brains need not have previously sniffed the same exact set of odors in order to agree on a new set of scents. (2018-05-01)

The perfect shot of espresso every time with chemistry
The average American drinks more than three cups of coffee a day, contributing to a $40 billion industry in the US alone, according to the National Coffee Association. But not all coffee is created equal; flavor profiles vary. Focusing on espresso, scientists say they have now unlocked the key to creating consistent cups of java. The researchers are presenting their results today at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2018-03-21)

New report suggests three main groups of caffeine sensitivity
Coffee drinkers fall into one of three major groups based on their caffeine sensitivity, according to physician and author Dr J.W. Langer, in a new report authored for the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee. (2018-06-06)

Arabica coffee genome sequenced
University of California, Davis, researchers today announce the sequencing of the genome of Coffea arabica, the species responsible for more than 70 percent of global coffee production. (The researchers are all in San Diego through the weekend for the Plant and Animal Genome Conference and can be reached on cell or by e-mail.) (2017-01-13)

Researchers find short bouts of stairclimbing throughout the day can boost health
It just got harder to avoid exercise. A few minutes of stair climbing, at short intervals throughout the day, can improve cardiovascular health, according to new research from kinesiologists at McMaster University and UBC Okanagan. (2019-01-18)

Nut consumption may aid colon cancer survival
People with stage III colon cancer who regularly eat nuts are at significantly lower risk of cancer recurrence and mortality than those who don't, according to a new, large study led by researchers at Yale Cancer Center. (2018-02-28)

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