Popular Cognitive Function News and Current Events

Popular Cognitive Function News and Current Events, Cognitive Function News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Curcumin improves memory and mood, new UCLA study says
Daily consumption of a certain form of curcumin -- the substance that gives Indian curry its bright color -- improved memory and mood in people with mild, age-related memory loss, (2018-01-23)

Physical activity in midlife not linked to cognitive fitness in later years, long-term study shows
A study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers that tracked activity levels of 646 adults over 30 years found that, contrary to previous research, exercise in mid-life was not linked to cognitive fitness in later years. (2017-08-24)

Video games to improve mobility after a stroke
A joint research by the Basque research center BCBL and the London Imperial College reveals that, after a cerebral infarction, injuries in areas that control attention also cause motility problems. The authors propose to complement physiotherapy with another type of cognitive training, such as video games. (2018-02-14)

Diet modifications - including more wine and cheese - may help reduce cognitive decline
The foods we eat may have a direct impact on our cognitive acuity in our later years, according to new Iowa State University research. The study is the first of its kind to connect specific foods with cognitive decline. The findings show cheese protected against age-related cognitive problems and red wine was related to improvements in cognitive function. (2020-12-10)

High blood pressure may make it difficult for the elderly to think clearly
Adding another reason for people to watch their blood pressure, a new study from North Carolina State University shows that increased blood pressure in older adults is directly related to decreased cognitive functioning, particularly among seniors with already high blood pressure. This means that stressful situations may make it more difficult for some seniors to think clearly. (2008-12-15)

Neurological assessment of older adults: A crystal ball to the future
Indiana University Center for Aging Research faculty editorial in Archives of Internal Medicine says standard neurological exams of older adults are good predictors of future brain health and quality of life and should be part of physician's routine iexamination of older adults. (2008-06-23)

One step closer to finding a cure for brain diseases
Korean researchers identified a mechanism for signaling brain nerve cells through excitatory synaptic binding proteins. The finding provides important clues to understanding the principles of synaptic nerve transmission and thus can be used to analyze the fundamental causes of brain diseases and treat them. (2018-07-12)

Fitness in childhood linked to healthy lungs in adulthood
Children who are fitter and whose fitness improves during childhood and adolescence have better lung function as young adults, according to a large study published in the European Respiratory Journal. (2018-01-31)

Losing sleep undoes the rejuvenating effects new learning has on the brain
University of California and Stanford University researchers shed light on the role sleep plays in learning, showing that sleep-restricted rats had a lower rate of new cell survival in the hippocampus region of the brain than their rested counterparts. Ironically, a group of sleep-restricted rats given a non-memory task did better than their rested counterparts, suggesting there could be ways to design training regimens for chronically sleep-deprived people, including members of the military. (2006-01-09)

More education linked to better cognitive functioning later in life
New research from the University of California, Berkeley, analyzed the performance of around 196,000 Lumosity subscribers to quantify the cumulative effect of attending school on cognition, finding that more education is linked to better cognitive functioning later in life. (2017-08-23)

Parkinson's disease patients benefit from physical activity
A comprehensive review published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease confirms that people living with Parkinson's disease (PD) can benefit from being physically active, especially when it comes to improving gait and balance, and reducing risks of falls. It concludes that health professionals should be confident about prescribing physical activity to improve the health and quality of life of PD patients. (2016-11-15)

Aerobic exercise may mildly delay, slightly improve Alzheimer's symptoms
Geriatrics experts have suggested that exercising can improve brain health in older adults. However, not all studies of exercise and older adults have proven the benefits of exercise. A team of researchers designed a study to learn whether exercise could delay or improve AD symptoms. They reviewed 19 studies that examined the effect of an exercise training program on cognitive function in older adults who were at risk for or diagnosed with AD. (2018-01-26)

In older adults, fluctuating sense of control linked to cognitive ability
Everyone has moments when they feel more in control of their lives than at other times. New research from North Carolina State University shows that this sense of control fluctuates more often, and more quickly, than previously thought - and that this sense of control may actively affect cognitive abilities. (2012-02-13)

Stanford study shows why even well-controlled epilepsy can disrupt thinking
A study by Stanford University School of Medicine investigators may help explain why even people benefiting from medications for their epilepsy often continue to experience bouts of difficulty thinking, perceiving and remembering clearly. (2019-10-16)

Adolescents with frequent PE more informed about physical activity's role in health
Frequent, long-term instruction in physical education not only helps adolescents be more fit but also equips them with knowledge about how regular physical activity relates to good health. (2017-04-12)

Exposure to childhood bullying and mental health
To what degree does childhood exposure to bullying contribute to mental health difficulties and do the direct contributions of exposure to bullying persist over time? (2017-10-04)

Food for thought: Studies reveal diet's role in children's brain health
Eating well, drinking enough water and taking certain supplements have all been shown to positively affect brain function in adults. Less is known about how these factors affect children. At Nutrition 2019, the annual meeting of the American Society for Nutrition, researchers announce new findings on the ways nutrition influences how children think, learn and behave. (2019-06-08)

NUS study: Eating mushrooms may reduce the risk of cognitive decline
Researchers from the National University of Singapore found that seniors who consume more than two standard portions of mushrooms weekly may have 50 percent reduced odds of having mild cognitive impairment. (2019-03-12)

Better physical fitness and lower aortic stiffness key to slower brain aging
The rate of decline in certain aspects of memory may be explained by a combination of overall physical fitness and the stiffness of the central arteries, researchers from Swinburne's Centre for Human Psychopharmacology have found. (2018-06-12)

Vascular risk factors and Alzheimer's disease: A new therapeutic opportunity?
Currently, no possibility exists to reliably quantify the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) onset in the general population and in subjects with mild cognitive impairment. (2017-08-02)

Researchers propose how REM and non-REM sleep may work together to help us solve problems
Sleep is known to be important for creative thinking, but exactly how it helps and what role each sleep stage -- REM and non-REM -- plays remains unclear. A team of researchers have now developed a hypothesis, outlined in an Opinion published May 15 in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences, to explain how the interleaving of REM and non-REM sleep might facilitate creative problem solving in different but complementary ways. (2018-05-15)

How depression can muddle thinking
Depression is associated with sadness, fatigue and a lack of motivation. But people with depression can also have trouble processing information and solving problems. Now scientists studying a rat model for depression are identifying on a molecular level how the condition could affect thinking. The findings, published in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience, could lead to the development of new depression treatments that would address associated cognitive problems. (2017-02-15)

Study describes changes to structural brain networks after radiotherapy for brain tumors
Researchers compared the thickness of brain cortex in patients with brain tumors before and after radiation therapy was applied and found significant dose-dependent changes in the structural properties of cortical neural networks, at both the local and global level. (2017-06-26)

Physical abuse and punishment impact children's academic performance
A Penn State researcher and her collaborator found that physical abuse was associated with decreases in children's cognitive performance, while non-abusive forms of physical punishment were independently associated with reduced school engagement and increased peer isolation. (2017-09-29)

Children's complex thinking skills begin forming before they go to school
New research reveals that children begin to show signs of higher-level thinking skills as young as age 4 and a half. Researchers have previously attributed higher-order thinking development to knowledge acquisition and better schooling, but the new longitudinal study shows that other skills, not always connected with knowledge, play a role in the ability of children to reason analytically. (2013-01-23)

Eating more foods with choline during pregnancy could boost baby's brain
When expectant mothers consume sufficient amounts of the nutrient choline during pregnancy, their offspring gain enduring cognitive benefits, a new Cornell University study suggests. (2018-01-04)

Repeated periods of poverty accelerate the ageing process
People who have found themselves below the relative poverty threshold four or more times in their adult life age significantly earlier than others. This is shown in new research from the Department of Health and Medical Sciences at the University of Copenhagen. (2019-09-12)

Study: Sepsis survivors require follow-up support
Survivors of sepsis -- a life-threatening response to an infection -- have expressed a need for advocacy and follow-up support, according to a study authored by professors at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis, and published in Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing. (2019-11-19)

Descriptive phrases for how often food should be eaten helps preschoolers better understand healthy eating
Preschool is a critical period for children to begin to make their own dietary decisions to develop life-long healthy eating habits. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that preschoolers who learned how to classify food as healthy or unhealthy were more likely to say they would choose healthy food as a snack. (2018-02-22)

Can a video game-based 'digital medicine' help children with autism and co-occurring ADHD?
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) evaluated a digital medicine tool designed as an investigational treatment for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and co-occurring attention/deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). (2019-01-03)

Brain scans show why people get aggressive after a drink or two
Researchers have used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans that measure blood flow in the brain to better understand why people often become aggressive and violent after drinking alcohol. After only two drinks, the researchers noted changes in the working of the prefrontal cortex of the brain, the part normally involved in tempering a person's levels of aggression. (2018-02-12)

NUS researchers unravel new insights into how brain beats distractions to retain memories
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have recently discovered a mechanism that could explain how the brain retains working memory when faced with distractions. These findings could endow cognitive flexibility to neural networks used for artificial intelligence. (2017-10-31)

Neurotrophic factor GDNF is an important regulator of dopamine neurons in the brain
New research results are expanding our understanding of the physiological role of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor GDNF in the function of the brain's dopamine systems. In an article recently published in the Journal of Neuroscience, University of Helsinki researchers establish that GDNF is an important physiological regulator of the functioning of the brain's dopamine neurons. (2017-02-15)

How the brain might compensate stress during learning
When people have to assess a situation within seconds, it helps them to draw on learned categories. Psychologists from the Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum examined with the help of electroencephalography (EEG) how well category-learning works in a stressful episode. They published their research on a mechanism, the brain may compensate stress with, in the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. (2018-03-08)

In wine, there's health: Low levels of alcohol good for the brain
While a couple of glasses of wine can help clear the mind after a busy day, new research shows that it may actually help clean the mind as well. The new study, which appears in the journal Scientific Reports, shows that low levels of alcohol consumption tamp down inflammation and helps the brain clear away toxins, including those associated with Alzheimer's disease. (2018-02-02)

Are you with me? New model explains origins of empathy
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute and the Santa Fe Institute have developed a new model to explain the evolutionary origins of empathy and other related phenomena, such as emotional contagion and contagious yawning. The model suggests that the origin of a broad range of empathetic responses lies in cognitive simulation. (2019-04-08)

New biomarker for dementia diagnosis
Medical researchers in the UK and Australia have identified a new marker which could support the search for novel preventative and therapeutic treatments for dementia. In an innovative new study, coordinated by Flinders University and University of Aberdeen, the researchers investigated the role of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), a blood marker associated with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease in epidemiological studies, on temporal changes in cognition in an established cohort of human ageing (the 1936 Aberdeen Birth Cohort). (2020-07-10)

Brain development disorders in children linked to common environmental toxin exposures
Exposures of pregnant women and children to common thyroid-hormone-disrupting toxins may be linked to the increased incidence of brain development disorders, according to a review published in Endocrine Connections. The review describes how numerous, common chemicals can interfere with normal thyroid hormone actions, which are essential for normal brain development in fetuses and young children, and suggests a need for greater public health intervention. (2018-03-23)

Brain pattern flexibility and behavior
The scientists analyzed an extensive data set of brain region connectivity from the NIH-funded Human Connectome Project (HCP) which is mapping neural connections in the brain and makes its data publicly available. (2016-11-29)

Respiratory tract infections in young children linked to asthma and worse lung function
Respiratory tract infections in young children are linked to an increased risk of asthma and worse lung function in later life, according to new research to be presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. An international study of 154,942 European children found a 1.5- to four-fold increased risk. (2017-09-09)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.