Popular Cognitive Performance News and Current Events

Popular Cognitive Performance News and Current Events, Cognitive Performance News Articles.
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Video games to improve mobility after a stroke
A joint research by the Basque research center BCBL and the London Imperial College reveals that, after a cerebral infarction, injuries in areas that control attention also cause motility problems. The authors propose to complement physiotherapy with another type of cognitive training, such as video games. (2018-02-14)

Diet modifications - including more wine and cheese - may help reduce cognitive decline
The foods we eat may have a direct impact on our cognitive acuity in our later years, according to new Iowa State University research. The study is the first of its kind to connect specific foods with cognitive decline. The findings show cheese protected against age-related cognitive problems and red wine was related to improvements in cognitive function. (2020-12-10)

Experience trumps youth among jumping fish
Tiny jumping fish can leap further as they get older, new research shows. (2018-03-16)

Neurological assessment of older adults: A crystal ball to the future
Indiana University Center for Aging Research faculty editorial in Archives of Internal Medicine says standard neurological exams of older adults are good predictors of future brain health and quality of life and should be part of physician's routine iexamination of older adults. (2008-06-23)

High blood pressure may make it difficult for the elderly to think clearly
Adding another reason for people to watch their blood pressure, a new study from North Carolina State University shows that increased blood pressure in older adults is directly related to decreased cognitive functioning, particularly among seniors with already high blood pressure. This means that stressful situations may make it more difficult for some seniors to think clearly. (2008-12-15)

Improving academic performance with physical fitness
Physical fitness in childhood and adolescence is beneficial for both physical and mental health throughout life. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that it may also play a key role in brain health and academic performance. In a new study scheduled for publication in the Journal of Pediatrics, researchers studied the independent and combined influence of components of physical fitness on academic performance. (2014-06-19)

AI algorithms detect diabetic eye disease inconsistently
In a paper published Jan. 5 in Diabetes Care, researchers compared seven algorithms to detect diabetic retinopathy against the diagnostic expertise of retina specialists. (2021-01-05)

More education linked to better cognitive functioning later in life
New research from the University of California, Berkeley, analyzed the performance of around 196,000 Lumosity subscribers to quantify the cumulative effect of attending school on cognition, finding that more education is linked to better cognitive functioning later in life. (2017-08-23)

Parkinson's disease patients benefit from physical activity
A comprehensive review published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease confirms that people living with Parkinson's disease (PD) can benefit from being physically active, especially when it comes to improving gait and balance, and reducing risks of falls. It concludes that health professionals should be confident about prescribing physical activity to improve the health and quality of life of PD patients. (2016-11-15)

In older adults, fluctuating sense of control linked to cognitive ability
Everyone has moments when they feel more in control of their lives than at other times. New research from North Carolina State University shows that this sense of control fluctuates more often, and more quickly, than previously thought - and that this sense of control may actively affect cognitive abilities. (2012-02-13)

Stanford study shows why even well-controlled epilepsy can disrupt thinking
A study by Stanford University School of Medicine investigators may help explain why even people benefiting from medications for their epilepsy often continue to experience bouts of difficulty thinking, perceiving and remembering clearly. (2019-10-16)

Food for thought: Ketogenic diets reduce athletes' anaerobic performance
The Saint Louis University research team found that after following a ketogenic diet, study participants did not perform as well at anaerobic exercise tasks. (2018-05-01)

Adolescents with frequent PE more informed about physical activity's role in health
Frequent, long-term instruction in physical education not only helps adolescents be more fit but also equips them with knowledge about how regular physical activity relates to good health. (2017-04-12)

School performance and body weight affects kids' self-esteem, study shows
It's well-known that within the adult population body weight and self esteem are very much inter related. But until now, the same wasn't known about children's healthy body weight and its relationship with a positive self-image. (2009-01-20)

Food for thought: Studies reveal diet's role in children's brain health
Eating well, drinking enough water and taking certain supplements have all been shown to positively affect brain function in adults. Less is known about how these factors affect children. At Nutrition 2019, the annual meeting of the American Society for Nutrition, researchers announce new findings on the ways nutrition influences how children think, learn and behave. (2019-06-08)

Exposure to childhood bullying and mental health
To what degree does childhood exposure to bullying contribute to mental health difficulties and do the direct contributions of exposure to bullying persist over time? (2017-10-04)

What should be the role of computer games in education?
Game advocates are calling for a sweeping transformation of conventional education to replace traditional curricula with game-based instruction. But what do researchers have to say about this idea and what is the role of policymakers? A new study out today discourages an educational revolution based on gaming and encourages adding promising features to games in schools including heightened use of explanative feedback in games and relevant pregame activities. (2016-01-12)

NUS study: Eating mushrooms may reduce the risk of cognitive decline
Researchers from the National University of Singapore found that seniors who consume more than two standard portions of mushrooms weekly may have 50 percent reduced odds of having mild cognitive impairment. (2019-03-12)

Schools should provide students with daily physical activity, IOM recommends
A new report from the Institute of Medicine says schools should be responsible for helping pupils engage in at least 60 minutes of vigorous or moderate intensity activity during each school day. (2013-05-23)

Influence of technology acquisition on organizational performance studied in Iran
80 international companies from Iran were selected, and 320 respondents in key managerial positions were questioned. As the researchers found out, acquisition and use of technological innovations is a positive influence on organizational efficiency. (2018-05-08)

Vascular risk factors and Alzheimer's disease: A new therapeutic opportunity?
Currently, no possibility exists to reliably quantify the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) onset in the general population and in subjects with mild cognitive impairment. (2017-08-02)

New brain mapping tool produces higher resolution data during brain surgery
Researchers have developed a new device to map the brain during surgery and distinguish between healthy and diseased tissues. The device provides higher resolution neural readings than existing tools used in the clinic and could enable doctors to perform safer, more precise brain surgeries. (2017-05-24)

Researchers propose how REM and non-REM sleep may work together to help us solve problems
Sleep is known to be important for creative thinking, but exactly how it helps and what role each sleep stage -- REM and non-REM -- plays remains unclear. A team of researchers have now developed a hypothesis, outlined in an Opinion published May 15 in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences, to explain how the interleaving of REM and non-REM sleep might facilitate creative problem solving in different but complementary ways. (2018-05-15)

How depression can muddle thinking
Depression is associated with sadness, fatigue and a lack of motivation. But people with depression can also have trouble processing information and solving problems. Now scientists studying a rat model for depression are identifying on a molecular level how the condition could affect thinking. The findings, published in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience, could lead to the development of new depression treatments that would address associated cognitive problems. (2017-02-15)

Better physical fitness and lower aortic stiffness key to slower brain aging
The rate of decline in certain aspects of memory may be explained by a combination of overall physical fitness and the stiffness of the central arteries, researchers from Swinburne's Centre for Human Psychopharmacology have found. (2018-06-12)

Why musical training benefits us in processing speech
A brain imaging study by Dr. DU Yi from the Institute of Psychology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and her collaborator Dr. Zatorre Robert from the Montréal Neurological Institute and McGill University has revealed that musical training might improve speech perception in noisy environments via enhanced neural foundation in bottom-up auditory encoding, top-down speech motoric prediction, and cross-modal auditory-motor integration. (2017-12-04)

Physical abuse and punishment impact children's academic performance
A Penn State researcher and her collaborator found that physical abuse was associated with decreases in children's cognitive performance, while non-abusive forms of physical punishment were independently associated with reduced school engagement and increased peer isolation. (2017-09-29)

Eating more foods with choline during pregnancy could boost baby's brain
When expectant mothers consume sufficient amounts of the nutrient choline during pregnancy, their offspring gain enduring cognitive benefits, a new Cornell University study suggests. (2018-01-04)

Academic performance of urban children with asthma worse than peers without asthma
A new study published in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology shows urban children with poorly controlled asthma, particularly those who are ethnic minorities, also suffer academically. Kids who were kept home due to asthma symptoms weren't able to do as well in the classroom. (2019-03-11)

Descriptive phrases for how often food should be eaten helps preschoolers better understand healthy eating
Preschool is a critical period for children to begin to make their own dietary decisions to develop life-long healthy eating habits. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that preschoolers who learned how to classify food as healthy or unhealthy were more likely to say they would choose healthy food as a snack. (2018-02-22)

Simple tests may predict older patients' risk of falling while hospitalized
Simple Tests May Predict Older Patients' Risk of Falling While Hospitalized A study of 807 older individuals admitted to hospital found that those who had poorer physical function at the time of admission were more likely to fall during their hospital stay; 329 falls occurred in 189 patients, including 161 injurious falls, of which 24 were serious. (2018-02-09)

Sensitivity to time improves performance at remotely controlling devices
A new study finds that people who are more sensitive to the passage of time are better at accounting for the latency -- or time lag -- inherent in remotely controlling robots or other tools. (2017-10-06)

Breast density and outcomes of supplemental breast cancer screening
In a study appearing in the April 26 issue of JAMA, Elizabeth A. Rafferty, M.D., formerly of Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, and colleagues evaluated the screening performance of digital mammography combined with tomosynthesis (a type of imaging) compared with digital mammography alone for women with varying levels of breast density. (2016-04-26)

How the brain might compensate stress during learning
When people have to assess a situation within seconds, it helps them to draw on learned categories. Psychologists from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum examined with the help of electroencephalography (EEG) how well category-learning works in a stressful episode. They published their research on a mechanism, the brain may compensate stress with, in the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. (2018-03-08)

In wine, there's health: Low levels of alcohol good for the brain
While a couple of glasses of wine can help clear the mind after a busy day, new research shows that it may actually help clean the mind as well. The new study, which appears in the journal Scientific Reports, shows that low levels of alcohol consumption tamp down inflammation and helps the brain clear away toxins, including those associated with Alzheimer's disease. (2018-02-02)

Repeated periods of poverty accelerate the ageing process
People who have found themselves below the relative poverty threshold four or more times in their adult life age significantly earlier than others. This is shown in new research from the Department of Health and Medical Sciences at the University of Copenhagen. (2019-09-12)

Are you with me? New model explains origins of empathy
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute and the Santa Fe Institute have developed a new model to explain the evolutionary origins of empathy and other related phenomena, such as emotional contagion and contagious yawning. The model suggests that the origin of a broad range of empathetic responses lies in cognitive simulation. (2019-04-08)

The brains of children with a better physical fitness possess a greater volume of gray matter
Researchers from the University of Granada lead a worldwide pioneering study that confirms that physical fitness in children may affect their brain structure, which in turn may have an influence on their academic performance. (2017-11-22)

Children who commute to school unaccompanied have greater autonomy and decision-making ability
Results of a UGR research show that children of ages above 10-12 years are more likely to travel to school unaccompanied and in an active way, that is to say, walking or cycling, which give them better safety perceptions and autonomy. (2017-11-27)

Teenagers gamble away their education
The odds are stacked against teenagers who regularly gamble. A new study in Springer's Journal of Gambling Studies shows that a 14-year-old who gambles is more likely to struggle at school. The study was led by Frank Vitaro of the University of Montreal, Sainte-Justine Hospital Research Center and the Research Unit on Children's Psychosocial Maladjustment in Canada. (2018-01-11)

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