Popular Colonoscopy News and Current Events

Popular Colonoscopy News and Current Events, Colonoscopy News Articles.
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New colon cancer finding could lead to earlier diagnosis -- and better outcomes
For many years, physicians have puzzled over why people with 'clean' colonoscopies went on to develop colon cancer. New findings from OMRF may help explain why, and the discovery could lead to ways to detect these cancers earlier and more effectively. (2018-03-28)

An epidemiologic study of microscopic colitis in Turkey
Microscopic colitis is a chronic diarrheal disease with normal colonoscopic but abnormal histopathologic features. It is a disease with two subtypes of similar clinical but different histological features: Lymphocytic colitis, which is characterized by pronounced colonic mucosal lymphocyte infiltration. Collagenous colitis, which is characterized by increased subepithelial collagenous band thickness. A group from Turkey investigated the prevalence and demography of microscopic colitis in patients with diarrhea of unknown etiology and normal colonoscopy in Turkey. (2008-10-07)

ASGE encourages patients to speak to their doctor about colorectal cancer screening options
Results of the National CT Colonography Trial, published in the Sept. 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, show improvements in the technology's ability to diagnose intermediate- to large-sized polyps in the colon, but this method of testing is not as effective in diagnosing small polyps. CT colonography is one of several colorectal cancer screening options. The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy encourages patients to speak to their doctor about the screening method that is best for them. (2008-09-17)

New guideline on calcium and vitamin D supplementation
A new evidence-based clinical guideline from the National Osteoporosis Foundation and the American Society for Preventive Cardiology says that calcium with or without vitamin D intake from food or supplements that does not exceed the tolerable upper level of intake should be considered safe from a cardiovascular standpoint. (2016-10-24)

New guidelines update recommendations on colorectal cancer screening
A new guideline on colorectal cancer screening released March 5, 2008 by an expert group representing a broad spectrum of health care organizations, including the American College of Gastroenterology, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and the American Cancer Society, offers recommendations for various alternatives for colorectal cancer detection and states a strong preference for screening tests that can prevent colorectal cancer. (2008-03-06)

Health groups issue updated colorectal cancer screening guidelines
The American Cancer Society, the American College of Radiology, and the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer (a group that comprises representatives from the American College of Gastroenterology, American Gastroenterological Association, and American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy) have released the first-ever joint consensus guidelines for colorectal cancer screening. (2008-03-05)

Beyond drugs for IBD: Improving the overall health of IBD patients
1.6 million Americans suffer from IBD. Identifying the best medical treatment leads to improved disease management, but IBD patients also experience mental, emotional and other physical side effects that need to be understood and managed to improve the overall health of IBD patients. Research presented at the Crohn's & Colitis Congress™ helps health care providers understand how to better manage their patients' overall health and mental well-being to increase the quality of their lives. (2018-01-19)

Adults with disabilities screened less often for colorectal cancer
Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer in the United States, with nearly 135,000 cases reported in 2016. The likelihood of surviving colorectal cancer is strongly related to the stage in which it is diagnosed. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine found that individuals with certain disabilities are less likely to receive recommended preventive screenings. The researchers hope the finding will lead to targeted interventions and increased awareness. (2017-03-29)

Colon cancer screenings may not pay off and could pose harm to some
Even though current guidelines advocate colorectal cancer screenings for those with severe illnesses, they may bring little benefit and may actually pose harm, according to a recent study by Yale School of Medicine researchers published in the Archives of Internal Medicine. (2007-12-18)

Regular cannabis users require up to 220% higher dosage for sedation in medical procedures
Researchers in Colorado examined medical records of 250 patients who received endoscopic procedures after 2012, when the state legalized recreational cannabis. They found patients who smoked or ingested cannabis on a daily or weekly basis required 14% more fentanyl, 20% more midazolam, and 220% more propofol to achieve optimum sedation for routine procedures, including colonoscopy. (2019-04-15)

New screening technologies improve detection of polyps during colonoscopy
Two studies presented at the American College of Gastroenterology's 73rd Annual Scientific Meeting in Orlando highlight new technologies with the potential to improve the detection of colorectal polyps and flat lesions during colonoscopy. The American College of Gastroenterology endorses colonoscopy as the preferred strategy for colorectal cancer screening because of its remarkable sensitivity in detecting and removing polyps before they become cancerous. (2008-10-06)

Blue dye tablet helps identify polyps during colonoscopy
Ingestion of a blue dye tablet during bowel prep for colonoscopy could be a significant advance in the early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). When used in conjunction with colonoscopy, the blue dye increased adenoma detection rate (ADR) by nearly 9 percent, according to a study scheduled for presentation at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018. (2018-05-22)

Comparison of fecal transplant using capsule vs. colonoscopy to prevent Clostridium difficile infection
Fecal transplant administered by swallowing a capsule was no worse than transplant using colonoscopy to reduce the risk of recurrent Clostridium difficile. (2017-11-28)

Colorectal cancer patients need colonoscopy after cancer resection
It is critically important that colorectal cancer patients undergo colonoscopy after surgery to ensure that they do not have a second colon cancer, and to find and remove any additional polyps. According to new recommendations from the U.S. Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer, the evidence shows that post-operative colonoscopy is associated with improved overall survival for colorectal cancer patients. Between 0.7 and 7 percent of colorectal cancer patients have a second, concurrent cancer. (2016-02-16)

Machine learning method identifies precancerous colon polyps
A machine learning algorithm helps accurately differentiate benign and premalignant colorectal polyps on CT colonography scans, according to a new study. (2021-02-23)

Some people uncomfortable discontinuing cancer screening even when benefit is low
A new study finds 29 percent of veterans who underwent recommended screening colonoscopies were uncomfortable with the idea of stopping these screenings when the benefit was expected to be low for them personally. (2018-12-07)

Water method for unsedated colonoscopy; interval between prep and colonoscopy predicts prep quality
A study appearing in the monthly March issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy from researchers in California focuses on the impact of a novel water method on scheduled unsedated colonoscopy in US veterans. Researchers in Texas looked at how the time interval between the completion of the last dose of bowel preparation and the start of colonoscopy predicts the quality of the bowel preparation in a study appearing in the March special issue. (2009-03-02)

By sending tests in the mail, researchers boost colorectal cancer screening
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers report that mailing colorectal cancer screening tests to patients insured by Medicaid increased screening rates for this population. Patients who received a screening kit in the mail were more likely to be screened than patients who received a reminder, a finding that suggests this method could serve as a model to improve screening on a larger scale. (2018-07-13)

CancerSEEK: Generalized screening for multiple cancer types
Researchers have developed a noninvasive blood test based on combined analysis of DNA and proteins that may allow earlier detection of eight common cancer types. In more than 1,000 patients, their method, dubbed CancerSEEK, detected cancer with a sensitivity of 69 to 98 percent (depending on cancer type). (2018-01-18)

A new, streamlined approach to diagnosing and treating bowel cancer
Researchers at the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) and the University of Adelaide have discovered a faster, more cost-effective way to determine which DNA mutations cause human bowel cancer. (2018-04-17)

Artificial intelligence: Is this the future of early cancer detection?
Overall, 306 polyps were assessed real-time by using the AI-assisted system, providing a sensitivity of 94 percent, specificity of 79 percent, accuracy of 86 percent, and positive and negative predictive values of 79 percent and 93 percent respectively, in identifying neoplastic changes. (2017-10-29)

Model predicting colorectal cancer screening suggests higher mortality for virtual colonoscopy
A model predicting complications for colorectal screening options found a greater risk of cancer deaths and procedure-related deaths in virtual colonoscopy as compared to traditional colonoscopy. (2004-11-01)

Many patients diagnosed with adenomas may not receive colonoscopies in recommended time frame
Patients who are diagnosed with adenomas, a possible precursor of colorectal cancer, often do not receive subsequent colonoscopies within the recommended time frame. (2018-11-20)

Colorectal cancer screening should start at 45, new research shows
Scientists in France analyzed over 6,000 colonoscopies and found a 400 percent increase in the detection of neoplasia in patients aged between 45-49 in comparison to aged 40-44. The vast majority of colorectal cancer screening programs throughout Europe commence between the ages of 50 and 55, with some not beginning until the age of 60. (2017-10-29)

Kaiser Permanente Northern California's colorectal cancer screening program saves lives
Kaiser Permanente members in Northern California are 52 percent less likely to die from colorectal cancer since the health care system launched a comprehensive, organized screening program, according to a new study in the specialty's top journal, Gastroenterology. (2018-08-09)

Screening for colorectal cancer spares male patients from intense treatments
While screening for colorectal cancer did not, so far, reduce mortality, it did reduce the need for chemotherapy and emergency surgeries among male patients, shows a recent Finnish study. (2018-11-21)

Study: Katie Couric wakes up America on colonoscopy screening
Colonoscopies in America increased nearly 20 percent after Katie Couric underwent a live, on-air cancer screening, University of Michigan researchers report today. The results show the power of having a celebrity spokesperson for a disease or condition. (2002-05-03)

Bleeding during endoscopy: Do anti-inflammatories play a role?
Does an aspirin-a-day increase the risk of bleeding during invasive diagnostic procedure? This is an important concern for many patients who take these and other antiplatelet agents in an effort to reduce heart attacks or strokes. Researchers at the MUHC have shown that antiplatelet drugs do not contribute to post-endoscopic bleeding. Their findings are published in this month's issue of Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. (2007-03-15)

Obesity linked to increased risk of early-onset colorectal cancer
Women who are overweight or obese have up to twice the risk of developing colorectal cancer before age 50 as women who have what is considered a normal body mass index (BMI), according to new research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (2018-10-12)

Multicenter study looks at colon polyps
According to a University of Pittsburgh-led study published in the December issue of Gastroenterology, medium-sized polyps found in the colon with flexible sigmoidoscopy and subsequently evaluated by full colonoscopy are associated with a significant number of advanced adenomas (high-risk polyps) and cancers. (2006-12-01)

American Cancer Society updates colorectal cancer screening guideline
An updated American Cancer Society guideline says colorectal cancer screening should begin at age 45 for people at average risk, based in part on data showing rates are increasing in young and middle-aged populations. (2018-05-30)

Brown-assisted trial finds new colorectal screening procedure is accurate and less invasive
A major clinical trial for colorectal screening finds that more patients stand to benefit from a comprehensive, less invasive method to accurately detect colorectal cancer and precancerous polyps. The Brown Center for Statistical Sciences helped design the trial, then monitored it and conducted the data analysis The results are published in this week's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. (2008-09-17)

Henry Ford Hospital study: Less prep needed for colonoscopy
Researchers at Henry Ford Hospital may have found a better way to prep patients for colonoscopy procedures so they no longer need to drink a gallon of prescribed fluids prior to the procedure. The study found that patients who took a pill that is FDA-approved for chronic constipation as part of the colonoscopy prep only needed to drink half of the liquid previously required to cleanse the bowels. (2010-05-02)

Study finds that competency in colonoscopy requires experience with 150 cases or more
Researchers from Korea have found that technically efficient screening and diagnostic colonoscopy generally requires experience with 150 cases or more. The study appears in the April issue of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. (2008-04-23)

Changing patient's position helps effectiveness of colonoscopy -- especially on one side
Having patients lie on their left side while the right side of their colon is being examined can result in more polyps being found, thus increasing the effectiveness of colonoscopy for colorectal cancer screening, according to a study in the September issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. (2015-09-10)

Infection rates after colonoscopy, endoscopy at US specialty centers are far higher than expected
The rates of infection following colonoscopies and upper-GI endoscopies performed at US outpatient specialty centers are far higher than previously believed, according to a Johns Hopkins study published online this month in the journal Gut. (2018-05-31)

Study examines interval colorectal cancer despite surveillance colonoscopy
Researchers studied the rate of interval colorectal cancer in patients participating in the Polyp Prevention Trial Continued Follow-up Study and found that nine cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed over 7,626 person-years of observation for an incidence rate of 1.2 per 1,000 person-years of observation. Of patients in whom colorectal cancer developed, 78 percent had a history of advanced adenoma. The majority of the cancers detected were early stage and therefore highly curable. (2010-01-06)

Studies examine Third Eye Retroscope during colonoscopy
Two new studies show an increase in polyp detection rates using the Third Eye Retroscope, a retrograde viewing device, during colonoscopy. The first study found that TER added to standard colonoscopy detected 13.2 percent more polyps than colonoscopy alone, including 11 percent additional adenomas (precancerous polyps). A second study examined endoscopist experience using TER and its impact on polyp detection rates, concluding that polyp detection rates improved significantly with TER. (2010-03-18)

Chronic diarrhea unresponsive to conventional medication: Are you taking lansoprazole?
Lansoprazole is a proton pump inhibitor which powerfully suppresses gastric acid production and is widely prescribed for chronic use in gastroesophageal reflux disease. Lansoprazole uncommonly causes chronic watery diarrhea unresponsive to conventional medication as a symptom of collagenous colitis. This association has recently been reported and is not widely known. Correct diagnosis and treatment without this knowledge is impossible. Discontinuation of lansoprazole results in the prompt resolution of diarrhea. (2009-05-12)

Breakthrough optical technology to assess colon cancer risk, accuracy
Researchers at NorthShore University HealthSystem and Northwestern University have discovered that fiber optic technology can for the very first time effectively measure blood levels in the colonic lining (mucosa) in humans, thus having potential applications for analyzing risk of colon cancer. The study used fiber optic technology to map microvascular blood content in patients during colonoscopy. The results provide the first indication that the early increase in blood supply is detectable in humans. (2008-10-01)

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