Popular Color Vision News and Current Events

Popular Color Vision News and Current Events, Color Vision News Articles.
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Automated technique for anime colorization using deep learning
Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology, IMAGICA GROUP Inc. and OLM Digital, Inc. report the world's first technique for automatic colorization focused on Japanese anime production. The new technique is expected to promote efficiency and automation in anime production. (2018-11-27)

For students of color, online racism leads to real-world mental health challenges
For college students of color who encounter online racism, the effect of racialized aggressions and assaults reaches far beyond any single social media feed and can lead to real and significant mental health impacts - even more significant than in-person experiences of racial discrimination, according to a recently published study from researchers at UConn and Boston College. (2021-02-23)

Researchers use smart phone to make a faster infection detector
Washington State University researchers have developed a low-cost, portable laboratory on a phone that works nearly as well as clinical laboratories to detect common viral and bacterial infections. The work could lead to faster and lower-cost lab results for fast-moving viral and bacterial epidemics, especially in rural or lower-resource regions where laboratory equipment and medical personnel are sometimes not readily available. (2018-04-24)

A simulator allows patients to experiment how their vision will improve before surgery
For the first time, patients will be able to experience how their vision will improve after a cataract surgery just before being operated. Thanks to a new wearable visual simulator developed by scientists from the National Research Council (CSIC), patients and surgeons are able to see the effects of an intraocular multifocal lens -- which allows seeing at different distances -- in a realistic way before being implanted. (2019-02-07)

Buzzkill?
They say love is blind, but if you're a queen honeybee it could mean true loss of sight. New research from UC Riverside finds male honeybees inject toxins during sex that cause temporary blindness. (2019-09-10)

Neurons that regenerate, neurons that die
In a new study published in Neuron, investigators report on a transcription factor that they have found that can help certain neurons regenerate, while simultaneously killing others. (2017-06-21)

New test may quickly identify mild traumatic brain injury with underlying brain damage
A new test using peripheral vision reaction time could lead to earlier diagnosis and more effective treatment of mild traumatic brain injury, often referred to as a concussion. (2017-02-16)

Recreating the chameleon: material mimics color changes of living organisms
Researchers at Nagoya University created a material containing photochromic dyes, crystals providing structural coloration, and a colored background that mimics the color changes that animals such as frogs, chameleons, and octopuses can display. This material could display different patterns and images depending on whether it was exposed to visible or ultraviolet light, or had a white or black background, which suggests its potential application in a range of next-generation display technologies. (2018-06-27)

Chameleon-inspired structural color soft robot can interact with environment
A novel structural color soft robot with both color-changing and locomotion capabilities has been developed by a research team led by Dr. DU Xuemin from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences. (2019-07-31)

Deep-sea fish reveals twilight trick
A new type of cell has been found in the eye of a deep-sea fish, and scientists say the discovery opens a new world of understanding about vision in a variety of light conditions. University of Queensland scientists found the new cell type in the deep-sea pearlside fish (Maurolicus spp.), which have an unusual visual system adapted for twilight conditions. (2017-11-08)

Better, bolder printing with silicon nanostructures
From textbooks to artwork to newspapers, printed items are a part of our everyday life. But the ink used in today's printers are limited in colors and resolution. Now in a new study in ACS' journal Nano Letters, scientists have found a way to expand the printable color spectrum with a novel nanostructure system. (2017-11-08)

Lightning-fast communications
Researchers from the University of Utah have discovered that a special kind of perovskite, a combination of an organic and inorganic compound that has the same structure as the original mineral, can be layered on a silicon wafer to create a vital component for the communications system of the future. That system would use the terahertz spectrum, the next generation of communications bandwidth that uses light instead of electricity to shuttle data. (2017-11-06)

SF State study finds US Forest Service lands underused by minorities
A new study by San Francisco State University and the US Forest Service finds that Forest Service lands are underused by minorities. The study recommends that public agencies improve their outreach to and hiring of minorities. (2018-05-31)

Study: Much of the surface ocean will shift in color by end of 21st century
Climate change is causing significant changes to phytoplankton in the world's oceans, and a new MIT study finds that over the coming decades these changes will affect the ocean's color, intensifying its blue regions and its green ones. Satellites should detect these changes in hue, providing early warning of wide-scale changes to marine ecosystems. (2019-02-04)

Pong paddles and perception: Our actions influence what we see
Most people think of vision as simply a function of information the eye gathers. For cognitive psychologist Jessica Witt, vision is a little more complicated than that. She has a new paper that faces head-on the notion that her experimental subjects have been victims of a psychological phenomenon called response bias. She employed a classic, action-specific experiment involving a video game familiar to children of the 80s: Pong. (2018-01-03)

Thin to win
University of Utah electrical and computer engineering researchers have developed a new kind of optical lens that is much thinner and lighter than conventional camera lenses that also works with night imaging, a future boon for smartphones that could flatten those unsightly 'camera bumps' as well as for drones and night vision cameras for soldiers. (2019-10-08)

Where you live is more influential than where you worship in shaping racial attitudes
Whites in multiracial congregations have more diverse friendship networks and are more comfortable with minorities -- but that is more because of the impact of neighbors and friends of other races than due to congregations' influence, a Baylor University study has found. (2018-04-23)

Zooming into cilia sheds light into blinding diseases
A new study reveals an unprecedented close-up view of cilia linked to blindness. (2019-11-05)

Infants can't talk, but they know how to reason
A new study reveals that preverbal infants are able to make rational deductions, showing surprise when an outcome does not occur as expected. (2018-03-15)

Reproducing paintings that make an impression
MIT CSAIL's new system can faithfully remake your favorite paintings via 3D printing and deep learning. (2018-11-29)

A chameleon-inspired material that stiffens and changes color
Researchers have developed a new material that mimics the dynamic properties of skin as it tenses -- and that changes colors in the process. (2018-03-29)

Study finds that people are attracted to outward signs of health, not actual health
Findings published in the journal Behavioral Ecology reveal that skin with yellow and red pigments is perceived as more attractive in Caucasian males, but this skin coloring does not necessarily signal actual good health. (2017-02-13)

Researchers discover evidence of the technology & behaviors linked to the emergence of human species
An anthropology professor from the George Washington University and a team of international collaborators, including scientists from the Smithsonian's National Museum of National History, have discovered that early humans in East Africa used coloring materials and obtained a range of raw materials from distant sources-- activities which imply the existence of social networks--about 320,000 years ago, much earlier than previously thought. (2018-03-15)

Improving mannequin design and training sessions could boost residents' success in clinic
As mannequins go, preemie Hal is on the top of his game. Because he's not real, that's where Hal and mannequins like him fall short, Children's National Health System researchers explained during the 2017 American Academy of Pediatrics national conference. (2017-09-15)

Is evolution predictable?
An international team of scientists working with Heliconius butterflies at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama was faced with a mystery: how do pairs of unrelated butterflies from Peru to Costa Rica evolve nearly the same wing-color patterns over and over again? The answer, published in Current Biology, forever changes the way evolution is understood. (2019-11-14)

Annoyed by floating specks in your vision? You may soon be able to zap them away
Millions of people who put up with seeing annoying specks drift through their field of vision may now have a safe, high-tech solution to their problem. A study of patients who had laser treatment to vaporize these flecks and spots known as floaters, showed a very low complication rate, according to research presented today at AAO 2017, the 121st Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. (2017-11-13)

Temperature may affect pollen color
While studies on flowers' petal-color variation abound, new research looks at differences in the performance of pollen under varied environmental conditions based on its color. (2018-01-05)

UTSA researchers create method that can quickly and accurately detect infections
Two chemistry researchers at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) have developed a method that can show quickly and accurately whether a person has been infected with harmful bacteria or other pathogens. Additionally, this new method shows the exact severity of infection in a person. (2018-06-12)

Transforming patient health care and well-being through lighting
The world of health care is changing rapidly and there is increased interest in the role that light and lighting can play in improving health outcomes for patients and providing healthy work environments for staff, according to many researchers. Recently, the Center for Lighting Enabled Systems & Applications (LESA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, together with the Illumination Engineering Society (IES), sponsored a workshop to explore pathways to define and promote the adoption of lighting systems specifically for health-care environments. (2018-02-23)

How the color-changing hogfish 'sees' with its skin
The hogfish can go from white to reddish in milliseconds as it adjusts to shifting conditions in the ocean. Scientists have long suspected that animals with quick-changing colors don't just rely on their eyes to tune their appearance to their surroundings -- they also sense light with their skin. But exactly how remains a mystery. A study reveals that hogfish skin senses light differently from eyes. (2018-03-12)

Retraining the brain to see after stroke
A new study out today in Neurology, provides the first evidence that rigorous visual training restores rudimentary sight in patients who went partially blind after suffering a stroke, while patients who did not train continued to get progressively worse. (2017-04-12)

Patients to skip the lab, get immediate results with new blood test technology
Engineers have developed a mobile version of the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), proving a cheap and easy way to obtain bloodwork and urinalysis without visiting a laboratory. (2018-03-26)

New tool predicts eye, hair and skin color from a DNA sample of an unidentified individual
An international team has developed a novel tool to accurately predict eye, hair and skin color from human biological material -- even a small DNA sample -- left, for example, at a crime scene or obtained from archeological remains. This all-in-one pigmentation profile tool provides a physical description of the person in a way that has not previously been possible by generating all three pigment traits together using a freely available webtool. (2018-05-14)

The 3-D selfie has arrived
Computer scientists at the University of Nottingham and Kingston University have solved a complex problem that has, until now, defeated experts in vision and graphics research. They have developed technology capable of producing 3-D facial reconstruction from a single 2-D image -- the 3-D selfie. People are queuing up to try it and so far, more than 400,000 users have had a go. (2017-09-26)

Hearing and visual aids linked to slower age-related memory loss
Hearing aids and cataract surgery are strongly linked to a slower rate of age-related cognitive decline, according to new research by University of Manchester academics. According to Dr. Piers Dawes and Dr. Asri Maharani, cognitive decline -- which affects memory and thinking skills -- is slowed after patient's hearing and sight are improved. (2018-10-11)

Cell phone use and distracted driving begins in the mind
Even simple cell phone conversations can cause distracted driving. Researchers have found listening on the phone while driving creates a lag in the mind to extract itself from one object before fixing attention on another object. Results published in the journal Psychonomic Bulletin and Review. (2017-06-05)

Animals have it all over us when it comes to color
University of Queensland researchers have developed new knowledge on how animals see and use color, and how their color vision has evolved. The Queensland Brain Institute's Professor Justin Marshall, co-author of a study undertaken with international colleagues, said color had an important role in reproduction and prey-predator interactions, although it served diverse functions in various animals. (2017-08-03)

New technique measures ultrashort laser pulses at focus
Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are used for numerous applications, but the quality of the results is limited by distortions caused by lenses and other optical components that are part of the experimental instrumentation. Researchers have developed a system that tells researchers what types of aberrations are present, which allows them to create the desired pulse at the focus that's free of distortions. (2008-05-08)

Honey bees have sharper eyesight than we thought
Research conducted at the University of Adelaide has discovered that bees have much better vision than was previously known, offering new insights into the lives of honey bees, and new opportunities for translating this knowledge into fields such as robot vision. (2017-04-06)

Haze pollution affects satellite cloud detection
Scientists compare cloud detection from four sensors onboard the 'A-Train' satellite constellation during two severe haze episodes in winter 2015-2016 and suggest that in severe haze weather the cloud product of MODIS should be used with caution. (2017-11-27)

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