Popular Competition News and Current Events

Popular Competition News and Current Events, Competition News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Good neighbors
In the animal kingdom, food access is among the biggest drivers of habitat preference. It influences, among other things, how animals interact, where they roam and the amount of energy they expend to maintain their access to food. But how do different members of ecologically similar species manage to live close to each other? (2019-01-22)

Small changes to organ procurement system could lead to more life-saving transplants
Slight changes to the system for allocating deceased-donor kidneys could result in higher rates of organ procurement and lead to more kidney transplants across the country, according to new research co-authored by an Indiana University Kelley School of Business professor. (2017-11-17)

The effects of variation in T6SS and bacteria on competition in host environment
A group of scientists studying the ways plant-associated bacteria interact were surprised to find that strains predicted to be more sensitive to bacteria were able to coexist with aggressor strains. 'Our findings are not consistent with a 'winner-take-all' result,' says Jeff Chang, 'and may cause researchers to think differently about bacterial behaviors that are generally assumed to be hostile and open new directions to pursue on the role of microbe-microbe interactions in plant-microbe interactions.' (2019-09-17)

Study: Collaborative video games could increase office productivity
Move over trust falls and ropes courses, turns out playing video games with coworkers is the real path to better performance at the office. A new study by four BYU information systems professors found newly-formed work teams experienced a 20 percent increase in productivity on subsequent tasks after playing video games together for just 45 minutes. The study, published in AIS Transactions on Human-Computer Interaction, adds to a growing body of literature finding positive outcomes of team video gaming. (2019-01-29)

Fussy eating prevents mongoose family feuds
Mongooses living in large groups develop 'specialist' diets so they don't have to fight over food, new research shows. (2018-03-14)

The future of grocery shopping: Faster, cheaper, smaller
Walmart was once considered the future of grocery shopping, offering consumers a slew of discounted choices, compared to the competition. Yet, market trends point toward a faster, cheaper, smaller and more streamlined experience. (2018-01-10)

UNLV study finds no testosterone changes in esports gamers
Players of the competitive esports video game League of Legends showed no change in testosterone during game play, UNLV researchers have found. (2018-02-16)

Artificial fingertip that 'feels' wins international robotics competition
An open-source 3-D-printed fingertip that can 'feel' in a similar way to the human sense of touch has won an international Soft Robotics competition for its contribution to soft robotics research. (2017-01-18)

The math of malaria
A new mathematical model for malaria shows how competition between parasite strains within a human host reduces the odds of drug resistance developing in a high-transmission setting. But if a drug-resistant strain does become established, that same competition drives the spread of resistance faster, under strong selection from antimalarial drug use. (2018-08-28)

Industry leaders align on the future of precision medicine
As a panel of judges at the Precision Medicine World Conference (PMWC) 2018 reach agreement, panel judge and Biogerontology Research Foundation Managing Trustee Dmitry Kaminskiy's favoured contenders for the title of Most Promising Company 2018 emerged as semi-finalists. (2018-01-30)

Lack of essential and affordable medicines in India revealed
Research has revealed the shocking lack of access to essential medicines in India, despite thousands being approved in an attempt to generate wider availability. (2018-01-25)

Kids born later in the year can still excel in sport
A child's birth month shouldn't affect their long-term prospects in high-level sport and those who hold off on specialising until later years may be the most successful, according to new research from the University of Sydney. (2018-01-31)

Chance is a factor in the survival of species
In a major study, biologists at Lund University in Sweden have studied the role of chance in whether a species survives or dies out locally. One possible consequence according to the researchers, is that although conservation initiatives can save endangered species, sometimes chance can override such efforts. (2018-03-26)

Spotted hyenas can increase survival rates by hunting alone
In a paper recently published in the journal Animal Behavior, Smith, a student in MSU's department of zoology, shows that while spotted hyenas know the value of living together in large, cooperative societies, they also realize that venturing on their own now and then to hunt for food is often the key to their survival. (2008-07-16)

Female mongooses help their pups by driving out rivals
Mongoose mothers boost their pups' survival chances by evicting rival females from their social groups, new research shows. (2017-11-14)

Why have all Western-owned digital firms failed in China?
Cass Business School publishes new study examining the failures of Western-owned digital firms in China and why this phenomenon is singularly prevalent in this region. (2018-04-23)

Household with mother (-in-law) means fewer kids
Women who live with their own mother or their mother in law in the same household have, on average, fewer children than women who only live with their spouse. Martin Fieder and colleagues, evolutionary anthropologists from the University of Vienna, report this on the basis of intercultural data of 2.5 million women worldwide. Until now, evolutionary biologists have assumed the opposite. The study appears in the renowned scientific journal 'Royal Society Open Science'. (2017-10-25)

Obesity inhibits key cancer defense mechanism
Obesity could enhance cancer development while aspirin might prevent it -- a new insight into potential targets for cancer prevention. (2018-04-26)

Study suggests native UK Pine martens are helping to control invasive gray squirrels
For many years, populations of a little red squirrel with cute ear tufts, a native of Great Britain, Ireland and Europe, have been in serious decline because of competition for food from an invasive North American gray squirrel and a pox it carries for which the native animal has no defense. Now, new research suggests that native pine martens, also once on the decline, are suppressing the invading squirrels' numbers. (2018-03-06)

Searching for the characteristics of award-winning wine
New WSU research shows large wine challenges tend to favor wines with high ethanol and sugar levels. Flavors often associated with sweetness, including exotic fruits in white wines and dried fruit and spiciness in reds, also increase the chances of winning top prizes. (2019-09-18)

Following Presidential action, AGS renews call for bipartisan collaboration
Presidential action to alter current law risks undermining progress made by Congress, the American people, and a cadre of healthcare stakeholders to improve care access, care quality, and care costs for us all as we age, so say experts at the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) evaluating recent orders by the Trump Administration. In light of these concerns, the AGS continues to call for stakeholder input, public hearings, and ample opportunities for feedback on health reform from the American public. (2017-10-13)

A mathematical crystal ball gazes into future of prostate cancer treatment
Using open data from four previously conducted clinical trials, teams of international researchers designed mathematical models predicting the likelihood that a patient will discontinue docetaxel treatment due to adverse events. (2017-08-04)

Biosimilar drugs could cut US health spending by $54 billion over next decade
Biosimilar drugs have been touted as one strategy to help curb the runaway costs of biologics that have advanced the treatment of illness such as rheumatoid arthritis and many cancers. A new study finds biosimilars could cut health care spending in the United States by $54 billion over the next decade. The savings are about 20 percent larger than a similar, widely cited analysis done three years ago by the same researchers. (2017-10-23)

Scientists created nanopowders for the synthesis of new aluminum alloys
The research team of Siberian Federal University together with the scientists of the Krasnoyarsk Scientific Center of the SB RAS has developed a method for the synthesis of aluminum alloys, the use of which will allow the creation of new types of products with improved characteristics based on aluminum. (2017-03-20)

Social work professor's domestic violence project wins major national award
A project which aims to prevent domestic violence in the Caribbean has won a national award for public engagement. The EU funded None-in-Three project, directed by the University of Huddersfield's Professor Adele Jones, was one of three projects shortlisted for the Health & Wellbeing award, in the Engage Competition run by the National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement (NCCPE). (2016-12-07)

Chimpanzees start using a new tool-use gesture during an alpha male take over
Similar to humans, non-human primates combine gestures, facial expressions, and vocalizations in various ways to communicate effectively. Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology investigated one such signal, the 'leaf clip' gesture, which re-emerged in a wild chimpanzee group during an alpha takeover. Importantly, the gesture was produced only by adult male chimpanzees, immediately preceded their pant hoot vocalizations and was associated with acoustic changes in those calls. (2018-06-28)

Cultivating corrupt ties in post-Mao China
This paper examines the unintended consequences of governance and economic reform efforts in post-Mao China through ethnographic examination of state audits, market reforms, and the recent anti-corruption campaign. (2018-05-15)

A classic Darwinian ecological hypothesis holds up -- with a twist
New University of Colorado Boulder-led research shows that a long-held hypothesis about the factors that govern species ranges largely holds true, but may be the result of a previously underappreciated ecological mechanism. (2017-12-25)

The world's first wireless satellite
A satellite whose components are not connected through electric cables but miniaturised radio modules: This innovation has earned two computer scientists from the University of W├╝rzburg the first place in the INNOspace Masters competition. (2016-05-12)

How invasive species threaten bats
A new review is the first to describe the scope of threats to bats by invasive species. (2017-08-30)

Rice psychologist identifies area of brain key to choosing words
New research by a Rice University psychologist clearly identifies the parts of the brain involved in the process of choosing appropriate words during speech. (2008-12-24)

Losing neurons can sometimes not be that bad
Current thinking about Alzheimer's disease is that neuronal cell death in the brain is to blame for the cognitive havoc caused by the disease. But a new study suggests that neuronal death in Alzheimer's may actually be a protective reaction against the disease. This could lead to a complete rethinking of therapeutical approaches to Alzheimer's. (2018-12-26)

Eurovision Song Contest associated with increase in life satisfaction
Participating in the Eurovision Song Contest may be linked to an increase in a nation's life satisfaction, according to new research. (2018-05-10)

Global trade entrenches poverty traps
A theorem published this week suggests that greater engagement in the international exchange can actually reinforce productivity-impeding practices that keep countries in poverty. (2017-10-26)

Alien honeybees could cause plant extinction
New research indicates that introduced 'alien' honeybees are competing for resources with native bees and threatening the survival of plants that rely on interactions with specific pollinators. (2018-02-08)

Life-history traits may affect DNA mutation rates in males more than in females
Large-scale DNA sequencing data have been used to investigate a long-standing evolutionary assumption -- that DNA mutation rates are influenced by such life-history traits as the time between an individual's birth and the birth of its offspring. One of the implications of this research is that life-history traits of extinct species now could be discoverable. (2011-06-13)

Math shows how human behavior spreads infectious diseases
Mathematics can help public health workers better understand and influence human behaviors that lead to the spread of infectious disease, according to a study from the University of Waterloo. (2018-08-16)

UT student wins competition at Beltwide Cotton Conference
Shawn Butler, a doctoral candidate at UT CASNR, recently won first place in a student oral paper competition at the 2017 Beltwide Cotton Conference. His research focused on the effects of spray technology on fungicide efficacy in target spot. (2017-01-30)

Price competition for generic drugs linked to increase in manufacturing-related recalls
Researchers from three universities have found that extreme price competition in the generic pharmaceutical market -- designed to make medications more affordable -- may be putting more patients at serious health risk, as evidenced by a higher number of product recalls caused by manufacturing-related problems. (2018-05-30)

Language juggling rewires bilingual brain
Bilinguals use and learn language in ways that change their minds and brains, which has consequences -- many positive, according to Judith F. Kroll, a Penn State cognitive scientist. (2016-02-13)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.