Popular Computed Tomography News and Current Events

Popular Computed Tomography News and Current Events, Computed Tomography News Articles.
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NUS researchers use AI to successfully treat metastatic cancer patient
A translational research team led by the National University of Singapore (NUS) has harnessed CURATE.AI, a powerful artificial intelligence (AI) platform, to successfully treat a patient with advanced cancer, completely halting disease progression. This new development represents a big step forward in personalised medicine. (2018-08-30)

New features of a gene defect that affects muzzle length and caudal vertebrae in dogs
A recent genetic study at the University of Helsinki provides new information on the occurrence of a DVL2 gene defect associated with a screw tail and its relevance to canine constitution and health. The variant was found in several Bulldog and Pit Bull type breeds, and it was shown to result in caudal vertebral anomalies and shortening of the muzzle. The DLV2 variant may also affect the development of the heart. (2021-02-23)

Model of health
Until now, there's never been a tool that could determine how long it will take a patient to heal from a tibial fracture. But researchers at Lehigh University's P.C. Rossin College of Engineering and Applied Science have found that a virtual mechanical test can do just that. Mechanical engineering professor Hannah Dailey is lead author of the paper, which appeared in the July 3, 2019 issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. (2019-09-10)

Free lung-cancer screening in the Augusta area finds more than double the cancer rate of previous screenings
The first year of free lung cancer screening in the Augusta, Ga., area found more than double the rate seen in a previous large, national study as well as a Massachusetts-based screening for this No. 1 cancer killer. (2017-03-09)

Hi-tech scans catch prehistoric mite hitching ride on spider
Scientists have produced amazing three-dimensional images of a prehistoric mite as it hitched a ride on the back of a 50 million-year-old spider. (2011-11-08)

Androgen receptor targeted imaging of prostate cancer as future modality for diagnosis
Future direction in prostate cancer imaging involves the development of androgen receptor based imaging using nonsteroidal antiandrogen agent for early diagnosis of prostate cancer. (2017-10-06)

New technique improves outcome for living donor liver transplants
Thanks to a review paper done at the University of Alberta radiologists at the University of Alberta Hospital are now using CT imaging for living-donor liver transplantation. CT imaging allows surgeons to plan the operation more accurately, which increases the likelihood for organ graft survival in recipients and reduces complication rates in donors. (2008-03-18)

Skin-ditching gecko inexplicably leaves body armor behind when threatened
When trouble looms, the fish-scale geckos of Madagascar resort to what might seem like an extreme form of self-defense -- tearing out of their own skin. Now, new research shows the geckos' skin contains a hidden strength: bony deposits known as osteoderms, the same material that makes up the tough scales and plates of crocodilians and armadillos. But the presence of osteoderms in fish-scale geckos raises a herpetological mystery: If they have armor, why do they discard it? (2017-08-03)

PET myocardial perfusion imaging more effective than SPECT scans in detecting coronary disease
Patients who receive cardiac positron emission testing (PET) imaging instead of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan experienced a significant increase in the detection of severe obstructive coronary artery disease, according to researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City. (2018-03-10)

Radiologists attempt to solve mystery of Tut's demise
Egyptian radiologists who performed the first-ever computed tomography (CT) evaluation of King Tutankhamun's mummy believe they have solved the mystery of how the ancient pharaoh died. The CT images and results of their study were presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. (2006-11-27)

Surrey AI predicts cancer patients' symptoms
Doctors could get a head start treating cancer thanks to new AI developed at the University of Surrey that is able to predict symptoms and their severity throughout the course of a patient's treatment. (2019-01-02)

CT scans reveal new muscles in horseshoe crab appendages
Digital dissection shows that two horseshoe crab appendages -- the pushing leg and the male pedipalp -- each have one more muscle than had been thought, according to a study published Feb. 14, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Russell Bicknell from University of New England, Australia, and colleagues. (2018-02-14)

American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) takes steps to improve the quality of ultrasound imaging in obstetrics and gynecology
The American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) convened a forum tasked with developing a roadmap for quality improvement in ultrasound imaging in obstetrics and gynecology and set up a task force to establish a consensus curriculum and competency assessment tools for residency training. The results of these efforts are published simultaneously today in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, and Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology. (2018-01-03)

On cryptocurrency exchanges, it's better to be a miner than a speculator, study finds
Someone who starts mining a crypto-currency shortly after it is listed on exchanges can potentially earn higher returns than average. But a speculator who enters the market shortly after the currency is listed might potentially earn lower returns. These are some of the findings from a study where computer scientists estimated the potential profitability of mining versus speculating for 18 crypto-currencies that are not Bitcoin and Litecoin--known under the general label of altcoin. (2018-03-27)

HBOT showed improvement in Alzheimer's Disease
Dr. Paul Harch, at LSU Health New Orleans, and Dr. Edward Fogarty, at the University of North Dakota, report the first PET scan-documented case of improvement in brain metabolism in Alzheimer's disease in a patient treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). (2019-01-24)

General emergency departments use CT to diagnose abdominal pain in children more often
A child with non-traumatic abdominal pain, a common symptom of appendicitis, is more likely to receive a computed tomography (CT) scan in a general emergency department (ED) than if he or she visited a pediatric emergency department, according to a study published in Pediatrics. (2017-09-15)

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Jan. 2018
ORNL story tips, Jan. 2018: Study identifies microbes to diagnose endometriosis without surgery; brain-inspired device can quickly classify data; neutrons 'see' how water flows through fractured rock; new method could help with demand for electric vehicle charging stations; bio-based, shape-memory material could replace today's conductors; novel approach for studying material's magnetic behavior could boost quantum computing. (2018-01-03)

Ultrasound for children with abdominal trauma
Despite evidence showing that the routine use of sonography in hospital emergency departments can safely improve care for adults when evaluating for possible abdominal trauma injuries, researchers at UC Davis Medical Center could not identify any significant improvements in care for pediatric trauma patients. (2017-06-13)

Are anxiety disorders all in the mind?
Using single-photon emission computed tomography, researchers in the Netherlands were able to detect biochemical differences in the brains of individuals with generalized social anxiety disorder, providing evidence of a long-suspected biological cause for the dysfunction. (2008-05-12)

Novel theranostic approach for treating pancreatic cancer patients shows promise
German researchers have developed a novel diagnostic and therapeutic (theranostic) procedure for patients with ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma, a deadly cancer with an extremely poor prognosis (five-year survival rate of less than 5 percent) and limited treatment options. The study is featured in the May issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2018-05-01)

Radiation therapy algorithm could reduce side effects, maintain effect against tumors
A mathematical model for computing radiation therapy treatments could substantially reduce patient side effects while delivering the same results as conventional radiation therapy. (2018-01-05)

Terahertz imaging technique reveals subsurface insect damage in wood
Insect infestation is becoming an increasingly costly problem to the forestry industry, especially in areas experiencing increased droughts and hot spells related to climate change. A new terahertz imaging technique could help slow the spread of these infestations by detecting insect damage inside wood before it becomes visible on the outside. (2019-07-25)

Once revolutionary, now dominant: OCT still shows rich potential for new applications
The revolutionizing technology of optical coherence tomography (OCT) is celebrated in a special section of the Journal of Biomedical Optics, published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. Detailed to the microscopic scale and noninvasive, OCT yields 3-D images of tissues inside the body and is a dominant diagnostic tool in ophthalmology with potential in numerous other areas. (2018-01-10)

Exceptionally preserved eggs and embryos reveal the life history of a pterosaur
Dr. WANG Xiaolin, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and his team reported on hundreds of three-dimensional (3-D) pterosaur eggs of the species Hamipterus tianshanensis from a Lower Cretaceous site in the Turpan-Hami Basin, 16 of which contain embryonic remains, allowing for an unexpected look at the embryology and reproductive strategy of these flying reptiles. (2017-12-01)

UGR scientist developed 3-D scans of beetles for Blade Runner 2049
One of the main visual effects companies behind Blade Runner 2049, BUF, sought the collaboration of Javier Alba-Tercedor, a Professor of Zoology at the University of Granada, to obtain scans of different species of beetles used in the film's visual effects. (2018-02-27)

Computed tomography provides anatomy -- we need ischemia!
CTA may facilitate management of symptomatic patients with low pre-test likelihood of CAD, in particular by conclusively showing absence of CAD. However, testing for inducible ischemia remains central for management decisions in both suspected and proven CAD and cannot be replaced by morphologic information. The use of CTA as a screening test for CAD in asymptomatic patients -- discouraged by current recommendations anyway -- should be abandoned. (2008-08-31)

Hundreds of fossilized eggs sheds light on pterosaur development
An invaluable collection of more than 200 eggs is providing new insights into the development and nesting habits of pterosaurs. (2017-11-30)

The Lancet: Prostate cancer study finds molecular imaging could transform management of patients with aggressive cancer
Results from a randomised controlled trial involving 300 prostate cancer patients find that a molecular imaging technique is more accurate than conventional medical imaging and recommends the scans be introduced into routine clinical practice. (2020-03-22)

New method effective in detecting dangerous coronary plaque
A new noninvasive method has shown success in detecting and measuring noncalcified plaque, a buildup of soft deposits embedded deep within the walls of the heart's arteries, undetectable by angiography or cardiac stress tests -- and prone to rupture without warning. (2008-05-29)

CT angiography highly accurate, multicenter trials show
Computed tomography angiography is as accurate as an invasive angiogram in detecting coronary artery disease, according to findings from the first two prospective multicenter 64-slice scanner trials. (2007-11-26)

Embryo fossils reveal animal complexity 10 million years before Cambrian Explosion
Fossilized embryos predating the Cambrian Explosion by 10 million years provide evidence that early animals had already begun to adopt some of the structures and processes seen in today's embryos, say researchers from Indiana University Bloomington and nine other institutions in this week's Science. (2006-10-12)

New research suggests a simple blood test could improve the early detection of lung cancer
New research led by scientists at the MRC Toxicology Unit suggests that by analysing levels of DNA in the blood, the early detection of lung cancer could be improved. The study, published in the journal Disease Models and Mechanisms, found that in preliminary tests using mice, a blood test could measure the circulating levels of DNA in the blood which cancer cells shed as they grow and multiply, and could even predict the presence of tumours in the lungs before they became cancerous. (2019-02-12)

Racial and ethnic differences seen in antibiotics prescribed for viral illnesses in pediatric EDs
Non-Latino white children seeking treatment for viral infections in the Emergency Department are about twice as likely to receive an antibiotic unnecessarily compared with non-Latino black children or Latino children, a multi-center study indicates. (2017-09-05)

Teaching quantum physics to a computer
An international collaboration led by ETH physicists has used machine learning to teach a computer how to predict the outcomes of quantum experiments. The results could prove to be essential for testing future quantum computers. (2018-02-27)

Study shows cycling as number one cause of cervical fractures in men
Sporting-related cervical fractures increased by 35 percent from 2000 to 2015, mainly due to an increase in cycling-related injuries, according to research presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Men experienced the most fractures due to cycling, while the most common cause of fractures in women was horseback riding. The most common cause of cervical spine injury in the United States was football, with the majority of those injuries being sprains. (2018-03-06)

Numerical infinities and infinitesimals open new horizons in computations and give unexpected answers to 2 Hilbert problems
In the last issue of the prestigious journal EMS Surveys in Mathematical Sciences published by the European Mathematical Society there appeared a 102 pages long paper entitled 'Numerical infinities and infinitesimals: Methodology, applications, and repercussions on two Hilbert problems' written by Yaroslav D. Sergeyev, Professor at Lobachevsky State University in Nizhni Novgorod, Russia and Distinguished Professor at the University of Calabria, Italy. (2017-11-22)

Artificial intelligence could prevent unneeded tests in patients with stable chest pain
Artificial intelligence (AI) could prevent unnecessary diagnostic tests in patients with stable chest pain, according to research presented today at ICNC 2019. A decision support system saved one hour of testing per patient. (2019-05-12)

Crabs in your computer
A study published in GigaScience provides three-dimensional visual data from hermit crabs using 3-D microCT scanning technology. The authors not only describe the data, they also provide downloadable, interactive files of everything in this study, allowing everyone to use and manipulate the data. They even include interactive web-based viewers and 3-D printable file formats. Making this complex data publicly available, allows researchers cost-efficient options for examining specimens without the need to send out precious samples. (2018-03-14)

Aortic aneurysm associated with decreased incidence of atherosclerosis
Having an aneurysm in the ascending aorta is significantly associated with decreased incidence of atherosclerosis. (2005-09-13)

First 3-D imaging of excited quantum dots
Quantum dots are rapidly taking center stage in emerging applications and research developments, but researchers are still studying how to precisely control the growth of these nanoscale particles and their underlying quantum behavior. For instance, defects form during production of semiconductor materials, so identical dots can differ in composition from one another. To learn more about these defects, a team has demonstrated imaging of an electronically excited quantum dot at multiple orientations. (2018-02-08)

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