Popular Computer Graphics News and Current Events

Popular Computer Graphics News and Current Events, Computer Graphics News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Automated technique for anime colorization using deep learning
Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology, IMAGICA GROUP Inc. and OLM Digital, Inc. report the world's first technique for automatic colorization focused on Japanese anime production. The new technique is expected to promote efficiency and automation in anime production. (2018-11-27)

Measuring AI's ability to learn is difficult
Organizations looking to benefit from the artificial intelligence (AI) revolution should be cautious about putting all their eggs in one basket, a study from the University of Waterloo has found. (2019-01-17)

The fast dance of electron spins
Metal complexes show a fascinating behavior in their interactions with light, which for example is utilized in organic light emitting diodes, solar cells, quantum computers, or even in cancer therapy. In many of these applications, the electron spin, a kind of inherent rotation of the electrons, plays an important role. Sebastian Mai and Leticia González from the University of Vienna succeeded in simulating the extremely fast spin flip processes that are triggered by the light absorption of metal complexes. (2019-10-04)

New computational method provides optimized design of wind up toys
A team of leading computer scientists has developed a novel computational system to aid the design and fabrication of wind-up toys, focusing on automating the intricate interior machinery responsible for the toys' wind-up motion. (2017-11-17)

For blind gamers, equal access to racing video games
Computer Scientist Brian A. Smith has developed the RAD -- a racing auditory display -- to enable visually impaired gamers play the same types of racing games that sighted players play with the same speed, control, and excitement as sighted players. Developers can integrate the audio-based interface, which a player can listen to using a standard pair of headphones, into almost any racing video game, making a popular genre of games equally accessible to people who are blind. (2018-03-06)

Get dressed!
Computer scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology and Google Brain, Google's artificial intelligence research arm, have devised a novel computational method, driven by machine learning techniques, to successfully and realistically simulate the multi-step process of putting on clothes. The new method will be presented at SIGGRAPH Asia 2018 (2018-11-20)

Engineering material magic
University of Utah engineers have discovered a new kind of 2-D semiconducting material for electronics that opens the door for much speedier computers and smartphones that also consume a lot less power. (2016-02-15)

Software lets designers exploit the extremely high resolution of 3-D printers
Software lets designers exploit the extremely high resolution of 3-D printers. (2017-08-04)

New behavioral science approach combines experiments, models
Researchers are outlining a new approach to behavioral research that draws on experimental studies and computer models to offer new insights into organizational and group behavior. (2018-01-03)

Student develops gaming technology for environmental scientific research
A Ph.D. student at The University of Manchester has developed a new method and software for using computer game technology for complex scientific and engineering simulations. (2018-04-12)

The magic of movies not tied to using latest technology according to new research
In the nearly 60 years between the 1939 release of Hollywood's first animated movie, Snow White and the Seven Dwarves and modern hits like Toy Story, Shrek and more, advances in animation technology have revolutionized not only animation techniques, but moviemaking as a whole. However, a new study in the INFORMS journal Organization Science found that employing the latest technology doesn't always ensure creative success for a film. (2018-01-26)

On cryptocurrency exchanges, it's better to be a miner than a speculator, study finds
Someone who starts mining a crypto-currency shortly after it is listed on exchanges can potentially earn higher returns than average. But a speculator who enters the market shortly after the currency is listed might potentially earn lower returns. These are some of the findings from a study where computer scientists estimated the potential profitability of mining versus speculating for 18 crypto-currencies that are not Bitcoin and Litecoin--known under the general label of altcoin. (2018-03-27)

Accelerating genome analysis
An international team of scientists, led by researchers from A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore and the Bioinformatics Institute, have developed SIFT 4G (SIFT for Genomes) -- a software that can lead to faster genome analysis. This development was published in the scientific journal Nature Protocols. (2016-02-22)

The 3-D selfie has arrived
Computer scientists at the University of Nottingham and Kingston University have solved a complex problem that has, until now, defeated experts in vision and graphics research. They have developed technology capable of producing 3-D facial reconstruction from a single 2-D image -- the 3-D selfie. People are queuing up to try it and so far, more than 400,000 users have had a go. (2017-09-26)

Algorithm generates origami folding patterns for any shape
A new algorithm generates practical paper-folding patterns to produce any 3-D structure. (2017-06-23)

It sounds like music to my ... brain!
It may sound like sci-fi, but mind reading equipment are much closer to become a reality than most people can imagine. Researchers used a magnetic resonance machine to read participants' minds and find out what song they were listening to. The study contributes to improve the technique and pave the way to new research on reconstruction of auditory imagination, inner speech and to enhance brain-computer interfaces for communication with locked-in syndrome patients. (2018-02-02)

Re-engineering antibodies for COVID-19
Catholic University of America researcher uses 'in silico' analysis to fast-track passive immunity (2020-07-30)

Speedy collision detector could make robots better human assistants
A faster collision detection algorithm could enable robots to work more fluidly in the operating room or at home for assisted living. The algorithm, dubbed 'Fastron,' runs up to 8 times faster than existing collision detection algorithms. It uses machine learning to help robots avoid moving objects and weave through complex, rapidly changing environments in real time. (2017-11-14)

New technology for dynamic projection mapping
It has been thought technically difficult to achieve projection mapping onto a moving/rotating object so that images look as though they are fixed to the object. A group of researchers from Osaka University succeeded to develop a technology for image projection onto moving objects. (2015-11-18)

Technique to allow AI to learn words in the flow of dialogue developed
A group of researchers at Osaka University has developed a new method for dialogue systems. This new method, lexical acquisition through implicit confirmation, is a method for a computer to acquire the category of an unknown word over multiple dialogues by confirming whether or not its predictions are correct in the flow of conversation. (2017-12-26)

Authors of year's best books in mathematics honored
Prizes for the year's best books in mathematics were awarded to Ian Stewart and Tim Chartier by the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) on Jan. 5 in Atlanta at the Joint Mathematics Meetings, the world's largest gathering of mathematicians. (2017-01-05)

Dew helps ground cloud computing
The most obvious disadvantage of putting your data in the cloud is losing access when you have no internet connection. According to research publishes in the International Journal of Cloud Computing, this is where 'dew' could help. (2015-09-15)

Review examines everything we know about Internet gaming disorder
An analysis of all published articles on Internet gaming disorder (IGD) notes that the condition has a complex psychosocial background, and many personal, neurobiological, familial, and environmental factors may put certain individuals at increased risk. (2018-04-10)

Software automatically generates knitting instructions for 3-D shapes
Carnegie Mellon University computer scientists have developed a system that can translate a wide variety of 3-D shapes into stitch-by-stitch instructions that enable a computer-controlled knitting machine to automatically produce those shapes. (2018-03-29)

Researchers develop data bus for quantum computer
The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future to build a data bus for quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the journal Nature Communications. (2017-11-06)

Artificial intelligence predicts patient lifespans
A computer's ability to predict a patient's lifespan simply by looking at images of their organs is a step closer to becoming a reality, thanks to new research led by the University of Adelaide. (2017-06-01)

In first, 3-D printed objects connect to WiFi without electronics
UW engineers have developed the first 3-D printed plastic objects that can connect to other devices via WiFi without using any electronics, including a laundry bottle that can detect when soap is running low and automatically order more. (2017-12-05)

Supercomputers use graphics processors to solve longstanding turbulence question
Advanced simulations have solved a problem in turbulent fluid flow that could lead to more efficient turbines and engines. (2019-07-25)

Researchers help to bridge the gap between psychology and gamification
A multi-disciplinary research team is bridging the gap between psychology and gamification that could significantly impact learning efforts in user experience design, healthcare, and government. (2018-09-25)

Computer systems predict objects' responses to physical forces
Presenting their work at this year's Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems, Prof. Josh Tenenbaum and one of his students, Jiajun Wu, are co-authors on four papers that examine the fundamental cognitive abilities that an intelligent agent requires to navigate the world: discerning distinct objects and inferring how they respond to physical forces. (2017-12-14)

Fur real: Scientists improve computer rendering of animal fur
The next computer-generated animals in King Kong or The Lion King could look a lot more realistic thanks to a breakthrough by computer scientists at the University of California. The researchers from UC San Diego and UC Berkeley developed a method that dramatically improves the way computers simulate fur, and more specifically, the way light bounces within an animal's pelt. (2018-02-21)

Unconventional superconductor may be used to create quantum computers of the future
With their insensitivity to decoherence what are known as Majorana particles could become stable building blocks of a quantum computer. The problem is that they only occur under very special circumstances. Now researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have succeeded in manufacturing a component that is able to host the sought-after particles. (2018-02-19)

Looking for the quantum frontier
Researchers have developed a new theoretical framework to identify computations that occupy the 'quantum frontier' -- the boundary at which problems become impossible for today's computers and can only be solved by a quantum computer. The team, whose work was highlighted in the first edition of Quantum journal this week, demonstrate that these computations can be performed with near-term, intermediate, quantum computers. (2017-04-27)

Walk this way: Novel method enables infinite walking in VR
In the ever-evolving landscape of virtual reality (VR) technology, a number of key hurdles remain. But a team of computer scientists have tackled one of the major challenges in VR that will greatly improve user experience -- enabling an immersive virtual experience while being physically limited to one's actual, real-world space. The research team will present their work at SIGGRAPH 2018. (2018-05-29)

What is the computational power of the universe?
Can a close look at the universe give us solutions to problems too difficult for a computer -- even if we built a computer larger than a planet? Physicist Stephen Jordan reflects on this question in a new NIST video, along with a scientific paper that considers one particular tough problem the universe might answer. (2017-11-15)

Hail technology: Deep learning may help predict when people need rides
Computers may better predict taxi and ride sharing service demand, paving the way toward smarter, safer and more sustainable cities, according to an international team of researchers. (2018-03-01)

Capturing the frugal beauty of complex natural tessallations
Surface tessellations are an arrangement of shapes which are tightly fitted, and form repeat patterns on a surface without overlapping. Imagine the pattern of a giraffe's fur, the shell of a tortoise and the honeycomb of bees -- all form natural tessellations. A global team of computer scientists has developed a new, alternate model for replicating these intricate surface designs, veering away from classical, multi-step approaches to a more efficient, streamlined algorithm. (2018-11-21)

Study finds gender bias in open-source programming
A study comparing acceptance rates of contributions from men and women in an open-source software community finds that, overall, women's contributions tend to be accepted more often than men's -- but when a woman's gender is identifiable, they are rejected more often. (2017-05-01)

Brain-computer interface, promise of restoring communication discussed at AAAS presentation
Choosing the 'right' brain-computer interface that maximizes reliability of the neural control signal and minimizes fatigue and frustration is critical. Jonathan Brumberg of the University of Kansas will present on this subject and demonstrate a variety of brain-computer interfaces Feb. 17 at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. (2019-02-15)

Nodding raises likability and approachability
The act of nodding positively affects the subjective likability of people by about 30 percent and their approachability by 40 percent, according to a study conducted by researchers from Hokkaido University and Yamagata University in Japan. (2017-11-27)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.