Popular Computer Model News and Current Events

Popular Computer Model News and Current Events, Computer Model News Articles.
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An ionic black box
While we embrace the way the Internet of Things already is making our lives more streamlined and convenient, the cybersecurity risk posed by millions of wirelessly connected gadgets, devices and appliances remains a huge concern. Even single, targeted attacks can result in major damage; when cybercriminals control and manipulate several nodes in a network, the potential for destruction increases. (2018-04-25)

Algorithm accurately predicts how electromagnetic waves and magnetic materials interact
UCLA Samueli engineers have developed a new tool to model how magnetic materials, which are used in smartphones and other communications devices, interact with incoming radio signals that carry data. It accurately predicts these interactions down to the nanometer scales required to build state-of-the-art communications technologies. (2018-09-10)

Impact of global warming on weather patterns underestimated
The impact of global warming on European weather patterns has been underestimated, according to a new report published in Nature this week. The Northern Hemisphere Circulation study found that present climate change models - computer representations of the atmosphere, ocean and land surface - have underestimated the changes in air pressure, leading to an underestimate of the impact of global warming on weather patterns. (2005-09-21)

Measuring AI's ability to learn is difficult
Organizations looking to benefit from the artificial intelligence (AI) revolution should be cautious about putting all their eggs in one basket, a study from the University of Waterloo has found. (2019-01-17)

New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic
When engineers or designers wanted to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed car or an airplane, the procedure usually took hours or even a day. Nobuyuki Umetani and Bernd Bickel have now significantly sped up this process, making streamlines and parameters available in real-time. Their method, which is the first to use machine learning to model flow around continuously editable 3D objects, will be presented at this year's prestigious SIGGRAPH conference in Vancouver. (2018-08-14)

The math of malaria
A new mathematical model for malaria shows how competition between parasite strains within a human host reduces the odds of drug resistance developing in a high-transmission setting. But if a drug-resistant strain does become established, that same competition drives the spread of resistance faster, under strong selection from antimalarial drug use. (2018-08-28)

A 'virtual heart' to simulate arrhythmia
A group of researchers from MIPT and Ghent University have proposed a mathematical model which is able to determine the factors responsible for the formation of different fibrosis patterns, which are believed to cause arrhythmia. To reproduce the formation of cardiac tissue, the researchers took a mathematical model -- one that is widely applied to study tissue growth -- and optimized it using the previously collected experimental data. (2017-09-06)

The fast dance of electron spins
Metal complexes show a fascinating behavior in their interactions with light, which for example is utilized in organic light emitting diodes, solar cells, quantum computers, or even in cancer therapy. In many of these applications, the electron spin, a kind of inherent rotation of the electrons, plays an important role. Sebastian Mai and Leticia González from the University of Vienna succeeded in simulating the extremely fast spin flip processes that are triggered by the light absorption of metal complexes. (2019-10-04)

New computational method provides optimized design of wind up toys
A team of leading computer scientists has developed a novel computational system to aid the design and fabrication of wind-up toys, focusing on automating the intricate interior machinery responsible for the toys' wind-up motion. (2017-11-17)

Heart patch could limit muscle damage in heart attack aftermath
Guided by computer simulations, an international team of researchers has developed an adhesive patch that can provide support for damaged heart tissue, potentially reducing the stretching of heart muscle that's common after a heart attack. (2019-04-17)

Big data for little creatures
A multi-disciplinary team of researchers at UC Riverside has received $3 million from the National Science Foundation Research Traineeship program to prepare the next generation of scientists and engineers who will learn how to exploit the power of big data to understand insects. The program, the first of its kind worldwide, will serve as a replicable education and training model for other institutions with an interest in developing computational entomology programs. (2016-10-10)

Plant respiration could become a bigger feedback on climate than expected
New research suggests that plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warns that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel burning. (2017-11-17)

How seafloor weathering drives the slow carbon cycle
A previously unknown connection between geological atmospheric carbon dioxide cycles and the fluctuating capacity of the ocean crust to store carbon dioxide has been uncovered by two geoscientists from the University of Sydney. Better understanding of the slow carbon cycle will help us predict to what extent the continents, oceans and ocean crust will take up the extra human-induced rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide in the long run. (2018-02-14)

Do as i say: Translating language into movement
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a computer model that can translate text describing physical movements directly into simple computer-generated animations, a first step toward someday generating movies directly from scripts. (2019-09-10)

Reconstruction of major North Atlantic circulation system shows weakening
Rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have affected one of the global ocean's major circulation systems, the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), slowing the redistribution of heat in the North Atlantic Ocean. The resulting changes have been felt along the Northeast US Shelf and in the Gulf of Maine, which has warmed 99 percent faster than the global ocean over the past ten years, impacting distributions of fish and other species and their prey. (2018-04-11)

Solidarity between good and justice keeps a society together
Soka University researcher Isamu Okada and his collaborators Tatsuya Sasaki (University of Vienna) and Yutaka Nakai (Shibaura Institute of Technology) have found that the solidarity of philanthropism and reciprocity is necessary to maintain cooperative societies. Their paper was published in Scientific Reports on Aug. 29, 2017. (2017-09-22)

Theft behind Planet 9 in our solar system
Through a computer-simulated study, astronomers at Lund University in Sweden show that it is highly likely that the so-called Planet 9 is an exoplanet. This would make it the first exoplanet to be discovered inside our own solar system. The theory is that our sun, in its youth some 4.5 billion years ago, stole Planet 9 from its original star. (2016-05-31)

An unbiased approach for sifting through big data
A new method could help researchers develop unbiased indicators for assessing complex systems such as population health. (2018-02-02)

New behavioral science approach combines experiments, models
Researchers are outlining a new approach to behavioral research that draws on experimental studies and computer models to offer new insights into organizational and group behavior. (2018-01-03)

New model may provide insights on neurocognitive disorders caused by HIV
HIV infects certain cells in the brain called microglia, and infected microglia release toxic and inflammatory molecules that can impair or kill surrounding neurons. (2017-11-08)

Learning makes animals intelligent
The fact that animals can use tools, have self-control and certain expectations of life can be explained with the help of a new learning model for animal behavior. Researchers at Stockholm University and Brooklyn College have combined knowledge from the fields of artificial intelligence, ethology and the psychology of learning to solve several problems concerning the behavior and intelligence of animals. (2016-11-29)

A novel precision cancer model opens doors to personalized cancer treatment
Researchers from the Seve Ballesteros Foundation-CNIO Brain Tumour Group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have developed an extremely powerful and versatile mouse model that will improve cancer research and accelerate preclinical testing of novel targeted therapies. Their work appears in Nature Communications. (2018-04-13)

Study: To prevent collapse of tropical forests, protect their shape
Scientists have made a fundamental discovery about how fires on the edges of tropical forests control their shape and stability. The study implies that when patches of tropical forest lose their natural shape it could contribute to the catastrophic transformation of that land from trees to grass. (2018-03-30)

Balancing time & space in the brain: New model holds promise for predicting brain dynamics
A team of scientists has extended the balanced network model to provide deep and testable predictions linking brain circuits to brain activity. (2016-10-31)

Climate, grasses and teeth -- the evolution of South America mammals
Grass-eating mammals, including armadillos as big as Volkswagens, became more diverse in South America about 6 million years ago because shifts in atmospheric circulation drove changes in climate and vegetation, according to new research. About 7 to 6 million years ago, the global tropical atmospheric circulation known as the Hadley circulation intensified. The climate of South America became drier, subtropical grasslands expanded and the numbers of mammal species that were good at eating grasses increased. (2019-04-29)

Reproducing paintings that make an impression
MIT CSAIL's new system can faithfully remake your favorite paintings via 3D printing and deep learning. (2018-11-29)

'NarcoLogic' computer model shows unintended consequences of cocaine interdiction
Efforts to curtail the flow of cocaine into the United States from South America have made drug trafficking operations more widespread and harder to eradicate. (2019-04-02)

Motivating gamers with personalized game design
A team of multidisciplinary researchers at the University of Waterloo has identified three basic video game player traits that will help to make game design more personalized and more effectively motivate gamers in both entertainment and work applications. (2018-07-09)

Artificial intelligence used in clinical practice to measure breast density
An artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm measures breast density at the level of an experienced mammographer, according to a new study. The researchers said the study, the result of a collaboration between breast imagers and AI experts, represents a groundbreaking implementation of AI into routine clinical practice. (2018-10-16)

Discovering what shapes language diversity
A research team led by Colorado State University is the first to use a form of simulation modeling to study the processes that shape language diversity patterns. (2017-02-10)

Century of data shows sea-level rise shifting tides in Delaware, Chesapeake bays
The warming climate is expected to affect coastal regions worldwide as glaciers and ice sheets melt, raising sea level globally. For the first time, an international team has found evidence of how sea-level rise already is affecting high and low tides in both the Chesapeake and Delaware bays, two large estuaries of the eastern United States. (2018-01-24)

On cryptocurrency exchanges, it's better to be a miner than a speculator, study finds
Someone who starts mining a crypto-currency shortly after it is listed on exchanges can potentially earn higher returns than average. But a speculator who enters the market shortly after the currency is listed might potentially earn lower returns. These are some of the findings from a study where computer scientists estimated the potential profitability of mining versus speculating for 18 crypto-currencies that are not Bitcoin and Litecoin--known under the general label of altcoin. (2018-03-27)

The 3-D selfie has arrived
Computer scientists at the University of Nottingham and Kingston University have solved a complex problem that has, until now, defeated experts in vision and graphics research. They have developed technology capable of producing 3-D facial reconstruction from a single 2-D image -- the 3-D selfie. People are queuing up to try it and so far, more than 400,000 users have had a go. (2017-09-26)

New model estimates odds of events that trigger sudden cardiac death
A new computational model of heart tissue allows researchers to estimate the probability of rare heartbeat irregularities that can cause sudden cardiac death. The model, developed by Mark Walker and colleagues from Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and IBM Research, Yorktown Heights, N.Y., is presented in PLOS Computational Biology. (2017-11-16)

Amazon basin deforestation could disrupt distant rainforest by remote climate connection
The ongoing deforestation around the fringes of the Amazon may have serious consequences for the untouched deeper parts of the rainforest. A new research study shows that it is not only the climate that is adversely affected by deforestation. In fact, the very stability of the ecosystem in the entire Amazon region is altered when deforestation takes place in the outermost regions. (2017-06-26)

It sounds like music to my ... brain!
It may sound like sci-fi, but mind reading equipment are much closer to become a reality than most people can imagine. Researchers used a magnetic resonance machine to read participants' minds and find out what song they were listening to. The study contributes to improve the technique and pave the way to new research on reconstruction of auditory imagination, inner speech and to enhance brain-computer interfaces for communication with locked-in syndrome patients. (2018-02-02)

Batman's Gotham City provides test case for community resilience model
If a community is resilient, it can withstand and recover from an unanticipated disaster, like an earthquake, fire or flood. But since every disaster and every community is unique, a uniform measure for defining 'resilience' has been hard to come by for engineers and social scientists. A new study offers an innovative approach to defining resilience that could help communities better prepare for hazards. (2018-01-05)

One step closer to understanding explosive sensitivity with molecule design
Explosives have an inherent problem -- they should be perfectly safe for handling and storage but detonate reliably on demand. (2018-04-18)

Ragweed research is nothing to sneeze at
To a person with a pollen allergy, an 18-acre ragweed field sounds like a sneezy, red-eyed zone of misery. But to two environmental engineering researchers at Johns Hopkins, the parcel presented a rare and valuable opportunity to learn how the troublesome weeds grow, reproduce and scatter their pollen under varying weather conditions. (2007-09-24)

Speedy collision detector could make robots better human assistants
A faster collision detection algorithm could enable robots to work more fluidly in the operating room or at home for assisted living. The algorithm, dubbed 'Fastron,' runs up to 8 times faster than existing collision detection algorithms. It uses machine learning to help robots avoid moving objects and weave through complex, rapidly changing environments in real time. (2017-11-14)

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