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Watching neurons in action
OIST scientists have devised a way of observing the working of single neurons in unsurpassed detail in a live animal. (2018-08-23)
Stress may protect -- at least in bacteria
Antibiotics harm bacteria and stress them. Trimethoprim, an antibiotic, inhibits the growth of the bacterium Escherichia coli and induces a stress response. (2017-03-23)
Some kitchen cabinets can emit potentially harmful compounds
Probably the last place anyone would want to find airborne polychlorinated biphenyl compounds (PCBs) is in the kitchen, yet that's exactly where scientists detected their presence, according to a new report in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology. (2018-04-18)
Charcoal remains could accelerate CO2 emissions after forest fires
Charcoal remains after a forest fire help decompose fine roots in the soil, potentially accelerating CO2 emissions in boreal forests. (2017-12-28)
Bacteria take a deadly risk to survive
Bacteria need mutations -- changes in their DNA code -- to survive under difficult circumstances. (2017-05-02)
High levels of estrogen in lung tissue related to lung cancer in postmenopausal women
Researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan have found that postmenopausal women with multicentric adenocarcinoma of the lung have a higher concentration of estrogen in non-cancerous areas of the peripheral lung than similar women diagnosed with single tumor lung cancer. (2016-10-25)
Anthropogenic lead still present in European shelf seas
Over many decades lead (Pb) has been released into the atmosphere due to human activities, such as combustion of leaded fuel. (2018-03-29)
Caterpillar attacks allow aphids to sneak up on plants
A New Phytologist study indicates that plants prioritize the protection of flowers over leaves and that simultaneous attack by aphids, caterpillars and bacteria leaves plants vulnerable to aphids but more protected from caterpillars. (2017-12-06)
Asthma in many adolescents is not an allergic disease
New research indicates that asthma in many adolescents is not likely to involve inflammation of the airways and therefore should not be considered an allergic disease. (2016-01-13)
Honey samples worldwide test positive for neonicotinoids
A global sampling of honey finds 75 percent to be contaminated with neonicotinoid pesticides. (2017-10-05)
Scientists of SibFU have found a way to determine the toxicity of nanomaterials
Official website of the Russian Science Foundation reports that a group of scientists from Siberian Federal University and Krasnoyarsk Scientific Center of the SB RAS has developed a bioluminescent enzymatic test system for assessing the toxicity of carbon nanomaterials. (2017-11-02)
Blood pressure diet improves gout blood marker
A diet rich in fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy and reduced in fats and saturated fats (the DASH diet), designed decades ago to reduce high blood pressure, also appears to significantly lower uric acid, the causative agent of gout. (2016-08-15)
Is there association between groundwater lithium, diagnoses of bipolar disorder, dementia?
High groundwater concentration of lithium, a naturally occurring trace element, wasn't associated with any benefit in diagnoses of bipolar disorder or dementia when accounting for local health care resources and demographics, two factors that can cause mental health diagnosis rates to vary. (2018-05-23)
Metals known to have harmful health effects found in indigenous exposed to oil spills
People from two indigenous communities in the Peruvian Amazon who live close to the country's longest oil pipeline have mercury, cadmium and lead in their bodies at concentrations that could be harmful to their health. (2018-02-09)
Rodent study finds artificial butter chemical harmful to lungs
A new study shows that exposure to a chemical called diacetyl, a component of artificial butter flavoring, can be harmful to the nose and airways of mice. (2008-03-13)
NOAA finds rising emissions of ozone-destroying chemical banned by Montreal Protocol
Emissions of one of the chemicals most responsible for the Antarctic ozone hole are on the rise, despite an international treaty that required an end to its production in 2010, a new NOAA study shows. (2018-05-16)
Antibiotics legitimately available in over-counter throat medications could contribute to increased antibiotic resistance
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that the inappropriate of use of antibiotics legitimately available in over-the-counter (OTC) throat medications could be contributing to antibiotic resistance, thereby going against World Health Organization (WHO) goals. (2019-04-11)
Growing isolation of poor helps explain changes in concentrated poverty
Concentrated poverty -- neighborhoods where 40 percent of the population or more lives below the federal poverty level -- is back on the rise for all races in the United States, according to Penn State demographers. (2017-03-14)
First direct observations of methane's increasing greenhouse effect at the Earth's surface
Scientists have directly measured the increasing greenhouse effect of methane at the Earth's surface for the first time. (2018-04-02)
An effective way to eliminate atrazine and its by-products in surface water
Atrazine, widely used as a weedkiller, is known to have harmful effects on aquatic wildlife and presents a risk to human health by altering the action of certain hormones. (2017-09-18)
Ozone recovery may be delayed by unregulated chemicals
Recent increases in an unregulated ozone-depleting substance, could delay recovery of Antarctic ozone levels by 5-30 years, depending on emissions scenarios. (2017-06-27)
Soil freeze-thaw stimulates nitrous oxide emissions from alpine meadows
Soil freeze-thaw is a common natural phenomenon in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, which can not only change the water and heat conditions, and the physical and chemical properties of soil, but also influence greatly the biosphere-atmosphere exchanges of greenhouse gases. (2018-01-09)
Illinois River water quality improvement linked to more efficient corn production
In a new University of Illinois study, nitrate concentrations and loads in the Illinois River from 1983 to 2014 were correlated with agricultural nitrogen use efficiency and nitrate discharged from Chicago's treated wastewater. (2016-05-10)
Soot transported from elsewhere in world contributes little to melting of some Antarctic glaciers
Airborne soot produced by wildfires and fossil-fuel combustion and transported to the remote McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica contains levels of black carbon too low to contribute significantly to the melting of local glaciers, according to a new study by researchers supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF). (2018-03-16)
Arsenic discharged from landfills, says Dartmouth research
A group of researchers at Dartmouth have studied the concentrations of toxic metals at the former Coakley Landfill in North Hampton, N.H. (2005-12-02)
Marijuana smoking linked with higher sperm concentrations
Men who have smoked marijuana at some point in their life had significantly higher concentrations of sperm when compared with men who have never smoked marijuana, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. (2019-02-05)
Substances used in household goods affect the immune system of a coastal mussel
In a study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, researchers from National University of Singapore have determined how perfluoalkyl substances (PFAS) affect the immune system of green mussels. (2018-02-05)
Infants who ate rice, rice products had higher urinary concentrations of arsenic
Although rice and rice products are typical first foods for infants, a new study found that infants who ate rice and rice products had higher urinary arsenic concentrations than those who did not consume any type of rice, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics. (2016-04-25)
Little growth observed in India's methane emissions
Methane is the second most powerful greenhouse gas and concentrations are rising in the atmosphere. (2017-10-10)
Air pollution associated with acute respiratory distress hospitalization of elderly
In a new study, researchers found significant associations between seniors' long-term exposure to two types of air pollution and hospitalization for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). (2018-05-23)
New sensor technology enables super-sensitive live monitoring of human biomolecules
The human body is an extremely complex molecular machine, the details of which can be followed through certain substances; so-called biomarkers. (2018-07-02)
Common insecticide can decimate tadpole populations
The latest findings of a University of Pittsburgh-based project to determine the environmental impact of routine pesticide use suggests that malathion -- the most popular insecticide in the United States -- can decimate tadpole populations by altering their food chain, according to research published in the Oct. (2008-09-29)
Research targets PFOA threat to drinking water
A highly toxic water pollutant, known as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), last year caused a number of US communities to close their drinking water supplies. (2017-06-08)
How intestinal bacteria can affect your blood sugar and lipid levels
Intestinal bacteria have attracted recent attention since they were discovered to influence various physiological functions and diseases in humans. (2018-04-10)
Cranberry juice creates energy barrier that keeps bacteria away from cells, study shows
People have long consumed cranberry juice to ward off urinary tract infections, though the exact nature of its action has not been clear. (2008-07-21)
Drinking glasses can contain potentially harmful levels of lead and cadmium
Enamelled drinking glasses and popular merchandise can contain more than 1000 times the limit level of lead and up to 100 times the limit level of cadmium, a study by the University of Plymouth has shown. (2017-11-05)
Vast majority of poor, urban women don't use prenatal vitamins before pregnancy, study shows
A study of more than 7,000 low-income, urban mothers enrolled in the Boston Birth Cohort found that fewer than 5 percent of them started folic acid supplementation and used it almost daily before pregnancy, a widely recommended public health measure designed to prevent potentially crippling birth defects. (2018-05-24)
Cells are pretty much smarter than previously supposed
Cells' G protein-coupled receptor signaling system is capable to pass more than 2 bits of information per one interaction with external stimuli. (2018-04-03)
Rapid pollution increases may be as harmful to the heart as absolute levels
Rapid increases in pollution may be as harmful to the heart as sustained high levels, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology,1 a European Society of Cardiology journal. (2018-02-15)
Study raises concern about flame-retardant metabolites in bald eagles
A study finds that chemicals used in flame retardants, plasticizers and other commercial products are broken down through the process of metabolism into other compounds. (2018-07-11)
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