Popular Conflict News and Current Events

Popular Conflict News and Current Events, Conflict News Articles.
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Association between weight before pregnancy, weight gain during pregnancy and adverse outcomes for mother, infant
An analysis that combined the results of 25 studies including nearly 197,000 women suggests prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) of the mother was more strongly associated with risk of adverse maternal and infant outcomes than the amount of gestational weight gain. (2019-05-07)

Effect of high-dose zinc, ascorbic acid supplementation vs usual care on symptom length, reduction among ambulatory patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection
These findings suggest that treatment with zinc, ascorbic acid or both doesn't affect SARS-CoV-2 symptoms. (2021-02-12)

Biodiversity and wind energy
The location and operation of wind energy plants are often in direct conflict with the legal protection of endangered species. The almost unanimous opinion of experts from local and central government authorities, environmental NGOs and expert offices is that the current mechanisms for the protection of bats in wind power projects are insufficient. This is one conclusion from a survey by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW). (2019-11-27)

Exposing hypocrisy can effectively reduce collective blame of Muslims for individual violent acts
White Americans were less likely to blame all Muslims for acts of terror committed by a Muslim when they were first asked to think about how much they were responsible for terrorist acts committed by other Whites. By highlighting the hypocrisy in a non-threatening way, the participants' prejudice toward Muslims declined, even a month after the intervention. (2018-01-17)

The Lancet: The weaponisation of health care: Using people's need for health care as a weapon of war over six years of Syrian conflict
Marking six years since the start of the Syrian conflict (15 March), a study in The Lancet provides new estimates for the number of medical personnel killed: 814 from March 2011 to February 2017. With nearly 200 attacks on health facilities in 2016 alone, medicine denied in besieged areas, and indispensable young medics forced to deliver care in extreme conditions, the study describes the extent to which health has been weaponized in the conflict. (2017-03-14)

Climate change increases potential for conflict and violence
Images of extensive flooding or fire-ravaged communities help us see how climate change is accelerating the severity of natural disasters. Iowa State researchers say what is not as clear is the indirect effect of these disasters and rapid climate change on violence and aggression. They have identified three ways climate change will increase the likelihood of violence. (2019-02-13)

Years of life lost associated with school closures during COVID-19
Potential years of life lost among U.S. primary school-age children associated with school closures during the COVID-19 pandemic are estimated in this decision analytical model. (2020-11-12)

Use of mobile devices at home can carry conflict to workplace, UTA study says
A University of Texas at Arlington researcher is part of a team of authors who have found that using a mobile device at home for work purposes has negative implications for the employee's work life and also their spouse. (2018-01-05)

The problem of jaguars and space in western Paraguay
A recent study, published in the journal Mammalia, shows how researchers used GPS technology and new analytical techniques to produce the first rigorous estimates of jaguar spatial needs and movements in the Gran Chaco and Pantanal ecosystems of Paraguay. (2018-03-21)

Is obesity associated with risk of pediatric MS?
A single-center study of 453 children in Germany with multiple sclerosis (MS) investigated the association of obesity with pediatric MS risk and with the response of first-line therapy in children with MS. (2019-07-15)

Mere expectation of checking work email after hours harms health of workers and families
The study demonstrates that employees do not need to spend actual time on work in their off-hours to experience harmful effects. The mere expectations of availability increase strain for employees and their significant others -- even when employees do not engage in actual work during nonwork time. (2018-08-10)

First public forecasts from ViEWS, a political Violence Early-Warning System
The challenges of preventing, mitigating, and adapting to largescale political violence are daunting, particularly when violence escalates where it is not expected. With funding from the European Research Council, ViEWS: a political Violence Early-Warning System at Uppsala University, is developing a system that is rigorous, data-based, and publicly available to researchers and the international community. On 7 June, ViEWS released its first public forecasts for Africa. (2018-06-08)

The memory part of the brain may also hold clues for anxiety and depression
New research finds that the hippocampus may yield important clues for a range of mental health illnesses including addition, anxiety and depression. (2018-04-13)

New research disputes claims that climate change helped spark the Syrian civil war
A new study shows that there is no sound evidence that global climate change was a factor in causing the Syrian civil war. (2017-09-07)

Supervisors, coworkers tolerate unethical behavior when production is good, Baylor study
A new Baylor University study published in the journal Personnel Psychology investigates why employees' unethical behaviors may be tolerated versus rejected. Researchers ask: when and why are people ostracized at work? (2016-04-06)

Brain stimulation influences honest behavior
Researchers at the University of Zurich have identified the brain mechanism that governs decisions between honesty and self-interest. Using non-invasive brain stimulation, they could even increase honest behavior. (2017-04-10)

Parents have more conflicts with their in-laws than do childless couples
Intergenerational relations include various forms of help and support but also tensions and conflicts. Although relations with in-laws are the subject of many anecdotes and proverbs across cultures, they remain little studied in contemporary societies. A new study investigates how being a parent is associated with conflicts between family generations. The research is part of the Generational Transfers in Finland -- a research project lead by Professor Anna Rotkirch and funded by the Academy of Finland. (2017-08-04)

How social media platforms can contribute to dehumanizing people
A recent analysis of discourse on Facebook highlights how social media can be used to dehumanize entire groups of people. (2020-05-20)

Research could improve management of conflict between wildlife and farmers across the globe
A new study led by the University of Stirling highlights improvements in the way conflicts between wildlife conservation and farming are managed worldwide. (2018-03-12)

Evolution acceptance in children linked to aptitude, not belief
In contrast to adults, acceptance of evolution in schoolchildren in the UK is linked to their scientific aptitude rather than conflicts with belief systems, say scientists at the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath. (2018-01-11)

Modern math sheds new light on long-standing debate about Viking-age Ireland conflict
Modern mathematical techniques -- similar to those used to analyze social-networking websites -- have allowed academics to shed new light on a centuries old debate surrounding the Viking age in Ireland and the famous battle of Clontarf in 1014. (2018-01-23)

Financial relationships between biomedical companies and organizations
Sixty-three percent of organizations that published clinical practice guidelines on the National Guideline Clearinghouse website in 2012 reported receiving funds from biomedical companies, but these relationships were seldom disclosed in the guidelines, according to a new study published by Henry Stelfox and colleagues from the University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada, in PLOS Medicine. (2016-05-31)

Researchers outline game-theory approach to better understand genetics
Principles of game theory offer new ways of understanding genetic behavior, a pair of researchers has concluded in a new analysis. (2018-09-04)

The ecological costs of war: Conflict a consistent killer of African megafauna
Princeton researchers report in the journal Nature that war has been a consistent factor in the decades-long decline of Africa's large mammals. But the researchers also found that wildlife populations rarely collapsed to the point where recovery was impossible, meaning that even protected areas severely affected by conflict are promising candidates for conservation and rehabilitation efforts. (2018-01-10)

Research methods that find serial criminals could help save tigers
A geographic profiling tool used to catch serial criminals could help reduce the casualties of human-tiger conflict, according to scientists who collaborated on an innovative conservation research study. The results of their research, published in Nature Communications, help explain how villagers in Sumatra coexist with tigers. If used pre-emptively it could have helped cut attacks by half, saving tigers from poaching and retaliation killings. (2018-08-27)

A neighborhood's quality influences children's behaviors through teens, study suggests
The quality of the neighborhood where a child grows up has a significant impact on the number of problem behaviors they display during elementary and teenage years, a study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers suggests.  (2017-11-09)

Is teledermoscopy cost-effective in Australia for skin cancer referrals?
An analysis estimates using teledermoscopy (dermatologic care that uses information and communications technology and digital dermoscopic images) in Australia for skin cancer referrals would cost extra per case but could achieve clinical resolution faster. (2018-05-09)

Does more education stem political violence?
In a study released online today in Review of Educational Research, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association, three Norwegian researchers attempt to bring clarity to this question by undertaking the first systematic examination of quantitative research on this topic. (2018-10-11)

Satellite imagery analysis reveals economic decay within Islamic State
A new RAND Corporation report paints a bleak picture of economic life under the Islamic State. RAND estimates that the Islamic State contributed to a 23 percent reduction in the GDP of cities under its control, based on novel applications of satellite-derived data. (2017-09-13)

Study estimates R&D spending on bringing new cancer drug to market
Research and development costs are a common justification for high cancer drug prices and a new study published by JAMA Internal Medicine offers an updated estimate of the spending needed to bring a drug to the US market. (2017-09-11)

Climate change means fish are moving faster than fishing rules, Rutgers-led study says
Climate change is forcing fish species to shift their habitats faster than the world's system for allocating fish stocks, exacerbating international fisheries conflicts, according to a study led by a Rutgers University-New Brunswick researcher. The study, published online in the journal Science today, showed for the first time that new fisheries are likely to appear in more than 70 countries all over the world as a result of climate change. History has shown that newly shared fisheries often spark conflict among nations. (2018-06-14)

Dramatic decline of Bornean orangutans
Nearly 50 years of conservation efforts have been unable to prevent orangutan numbers on Borneo from plummeting. The latest data published by a team from 38 international institutions, led by researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and Liverpool John Moores University in Great Britain, suggests that between 1999 and 2015 the total number of Bornean orangutans was reduced by more than 100,000 animals. (2018-02-15)

Study: Parental conflict can do lasting damage to kids
Even relatively low-level adversity like parental conflict can do lasting damage to children, a new study finds. Shy children are especially vulnerable. (2018-03-28)

Food abundance driving conflict in Africa, not food scarcity
In Africa, food abundance may be driving violent conflict rather than food scarcity, according to a study published in the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, a publication of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association. The study refutes the notion that climate change will increase the frequency of civil war in Africa as a result of food scarcity triggered by rising temperatures and drought. (2018-03-01)

Tapping into behavioral economics to boost clinical trial participation
Behavioral economics may offer a powerful tool for improving patient enrollment in clinical trials, argue Eric VanEpps, Kevin Volpp, and Scott Halpern in this Focus. (2016-07-20)

Ideology is not main factor that pushes children to join terrorist groups
Counter-terror efforts based on the assumption that children recruited into extremist groups are motivated by ideology are unlikely to be effective, and could even backfire, concludes a two-year research project led by the United Nations University. (2018-02-12)

Youth dating violence shaped by parents' conflict-handling views, study finds
Parents who talk to their children about nonviolent ways of resolving conflict may reduce children's likelihood of physically or psychologically abusing their dating partners later - even when parents give contradictory messages indicating that violence is acceptable in certain circumstances, University of Illinois social work professor Rachel Garthe found. (2018-11-16)

Having two jobs is great for employers, but family life suffers
People who hold two jobs demonstrate as much engagement and performance in the workplace as their colleagues who have one job. However, dual job holders are likely to sacrifice family and personal time as a result. These are the findings of a new study in Springer's Journal of Business and Psychology led by Brian Webster of Ball State University in the US. (2018-05-02)

Maasai farmers only kill lions when they attack livestock
Maasai farmers do not kill lions for retribution whenever they lose sheep or cattle, new research shows. (2019-02-26)

Better understanding of dog body language could make interactions safer
A better understanding of the way dogs communicate distress could be the first step in reducing the risk of dog bites for both children and adults, a new study has found. (2018-12-20)

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