Popular Conspiracy Theories News and Current Events

Popular Conspiracy Theories News and Current Events, Conspiracy Theories News Articles.
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Sex for cooperation
To understand the origins of human sociality studying the social dynamics of our closest relatives, chimpanzees and bonobos, is important. Using behavioral and hormonal data from a habituated bonobo community at the long-term LuiKotale field site in the Democratic Republic of Congo researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Harvard University and the Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology have now shown that same-sex sexual behavior in female bonobos increases friendly social interactions, including cooperation. (2019-09-10)

Is evolution more intelligent than we thought?
Evolution may be more intelligent than we thought, according to a University of Southampton professor. (2015-12-18)

Does dark matter annihilate quicker in the Milky Way?
Researchers at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research in Mumbai have proposed a theory that predicts how dark matter may be annihilating much more rapidly in the Milky Way, than in smaller or larger galaxies and the early Universe. (2017-06-23)

Electron behavior under extreme conditions described for the first time
Researchers have modeled the actions of electrons under extreme temperatures and densities, such as those found within planets and stars. (2017-10-06)

Brain scans show why people get aggressive after a drink or two
Researchers have used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans that measure blood flow in the brain to better understand why people often become aggressive and violent after drinking alcohol. After only two drinks, the researchers noted changes in the working of the prefrontal cortex of the brain, the part normally involved in tempering a person's levels of aggression. (2018-02-12)

When sciences come together
Kyoto University investigates how seemingly separate concepts in scientific fields fuse to become universal approaches by by developing a new methodology to analyze citations in papers that use similar concepts, and tracked the changes over time. The researcher used ABM -- agent based modeling -- and IBM -- individual based modeling as examples. (2018-03-09)

How quickly can children learn routes?
New research from the University of Liverpool suggests that children as young as eight can learn a route after only a single experience of it. (2018-01-09)

Racism linked to uptake of smoking in young people
Adolescents who have experienced some form of racism between the ages of 11 and 23 are more likely to take up smoking than those who have not, according to a new study led by King's College London. (2018-01-24)

Geoscientists suggest 'snowball Earth' resulted from plate tectonics
About 700 million years ago, the Earth experienced unusual episodes of global cooling that geologists refer to as 'Snowball Earth.' In a new study published in the April issue of the journal Terra Nova, two geologists at The University of Texas at Dallas and UT Austin suggest that those major climate changes can be linked to one thing: the advent of plate tectonics. (2018-05-07)

The origin and future of spam and other online intrusions
What does the future of digital spam look like, what risks could it pose to our personal security and privacy, and what can we do to fight it? (2019-07-25)

How long did it take to hatch a dinosaur egg? FSU research says 3-6 months
FSU researchers have set the timeline it took dinosaurs to incubate at three to six months, depending on the dinosaur. (2017-01-02)

Testing quantum field theory in a quantum simulator
Quantum field theories are often hard to verify in experiments. Now, there is a new way of putting them to the test. Scientists have created a quantum system consisting of thousands of ultra cold atoms. By keeping them in a magnetic trap on an atom chip, this atom cloud can be used as a 'quantum simulator', which yields new insights into some of the most fundamental questions of physics. (2017-05-17)

Reliance on 'gut feelings' linked to belief in fake news
People who tend to trust their intuition or to believe that the facts they hear are politically biased are more likely to stand behind inaccurate beliefs, a new study suggests. (2017-09-18)

Lying in a foreign language is easier
It is not easy to tell when someone is lying. This is even more difficult when potential liars speak in a language other than their native tongue. Psychologists of the University of Würzburg investigated why that is so. (2018-07-19)

A fundamental theory of mass generation
A team of four theoretical physicists, Francesco Sannino from Cp3-Origins at the University of Southern Denmark, Alessandro Strumia from CERN theory division and Pisa Univ., Andrea Tesi from the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago in US, and Elena Vigiani from Pisa University have recently published in the Journal of High Energy Physics their work (2016-11-14)

Polarization has strong impact on electrons, study shows
New research helps understand movement of electrons in two-dimensional systems. (2018-04-10)

No sex for all-female fish species
They reproduce through gynogenesis. Their offspring are clones of the mother. According to established theories, the Amazon molly should have become extinct a long time ago. A new study shows how the fish avoids this fate. (2018-02-12)

Tiny distortions in universe's oldest light reveal strands in cosmic web
Scientists have decoded faint distortions in the patterns of the universe's earliest light to map huge tubelike structures invisible to our eyes -- known as filaments -- that serve as superhighways for delivering matter to dense hubs such as galaxy clusters. (2018-04-10)

'Uniquely human' muscles have been discovered in apes
Muscles believed to be unique to humans have been discovered in several ape species, challenging long-held anthropocentric theories on the origin and evolution of human soft tissues. This questions the view that certain muscles evolved to provide special adaptations for human traits, such as walking on two legs, tool use, and sophisticated vocal communication and facial expressions. The findings highlight that thorough knowledge of ape anatomy is necessary for a better understanding of human evolution. (2018-05-23)

How we escaped from the Big Bang
A Griffith University physicist is challenging the conventional view of space and time to show how the world advances through time. (2016-08-17)

Emotions are cognitive, not innate, researchers conclude
Emotions are not innately programmed into our brains, but, in fact, are cognitive states resulting from the gathering of information, New York University Professor Joseph LeDoux and Richard Brown, a professor at the City University of New York, conclude. (2017-02-15)

Exchanges of identity in deep space
By reproducing the complexity of the cosmos through unprecedented simulations, a new study highlights the importance of the possible behaviour of very high energy photons. In their journey through intergalactic magnetic fields, they could be transformed into axions and thus avoid being absorbed (2017-09-07)

Fleet of spacecraft spot long-sought-after process in the Earth's magnetic field
A NASA mission has discovered an important process explaining the fate of energy contained in the turbulent magnetic fields surrounding the Earth. (2018-05-09)

Swansea University's physicists develop a new quantum simulation protocol
A step closer to understanding quantum mechanics: Swansea University's physicists develop a new quantum simulation protocol. (2017-10-20)

Massive exoplanet orbiting tiny star challenges planet formation theory
Astronomers have discovered a giant Jupiter-like exoplanet in an unlikely location -- orbiting a small red dwarf star. (2019-09-26)

Can we tell black holes apart?
Astrophysicists at Goethe University Frankfurt, and collaborators in the ERC-funded project BlackHoleCam in Bonn and Nijmegen have created and compared self-consistent and realistic images of the shadow of an accreting supermassive black hole. The goal was to test if Einsteinian black holes can be distinguished from those in alternative theories of gravity. (2018-04-17)

UChicago astrophysicists settle cosmic debate on magnetism of planets and stars
Using one of the world's most powerful laser facilities, a team led by University of Chicago scientists experimentally confirmed a long-held theory for cosmic magnetic field generation: the turbulent dynamo. By creating a hot turbulent plasma the size of a penny, that lasts a few billionths of a second, the researchers recorded how the turbulent motions can amplify a weak magnetic field to the strengths of those observed in our sun, distant stars, and galaxies. (2018-02-09)

Is the debate over coral skeletal development finally over?
A long-running debate over how coral skeletons are formed may be closer to resolution, as a new study reports that these structures form by a biologically controlled process, not one driven by chemical processes. (2017-06-01)

JFK was not shot from the grassy knoll, suggests new research
The long-held conspiracy theory that John F. Kennedy was shot by a second gunman on the grassy knoll is wrong, according to a new analysis of video footage of the shooting, published in the journal Heliyon. The results support the official autopsy findings: JFK suffered a gunshot wound caused by the same type of rifle as that owned by Lee Harvey Oswald, fired from the vicinity of the Texas School Book Depository building located behind the motorcade. (2018-04-25)

Dark matter mystery deepens in cosmic 'train wreck'
Astronomers have discovered a chaotic scene unlike any witnessed before in a cosmic (2007-08-16)

Did LIGO detect black holes or gravastars?
After the first direct detection of gravitational waves that was announced last February by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration and made news all over the world, Luciano Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany) and Cecilia Chirenti (Federal University of ABC in Santo André, Brazil) set out to test whether the observed signal could have been a gravastar or not. The results were recently presented in a paper published on Physical Review D. (2016-10-19)

Fake news 'vaccine': Online game may 'inoculate' by simulating propaganda tactics
A new experiment, launching today online, aims to help 'inoculate' against disinformation by providing a small dose of perspective from a (2018-02-19)

Astronomers find potential solution into how planets form
The quest to discover how planets found in the far reaches of the universe are born has taken a new, crucial twist. (2017-10-13)

Urban growth leads to shorter, more intense wet seasons in Florida peninsula
New research from Florida State University scientists has found that urban areas throughout the Florida peninsula are experiencing shorter, increasingly intense wet seasons relative to underdeveloped or rural areas. (2018-04-09)

Perpetrators of genocide say they're 'good people'
The men who were tried for their role in the 1994 Rwandan genocide that killed up to 1 million people want you to know that they're actually very good people. That's the most common way accused men try to account for their actions in testimony before the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, a new study has found. (2017-10-05)

How small does your rice pudding need to get when stirring jam into it?
Have you ever tried turning the spoon back after stirring jam into a rice pudding? It never brings the jam back into the spoon. This ever-increasing disorder is linked to the notion of entropy. In a study published in EPJ Plus, Loris Ferrari from the University of Bologna, Italy, demystifies the clash between two theories of entropy by analysing the practical consequences in two well-defined size systems, with a view to confirming them experimentally. (2017-12-22)

How does water change the Moon's origin story?
The Moon formed when an object collided with the proto-Earth. For years, scientists thought that in the aftermath, hydrogen and other so-called 'volatile elements' escaped and were lost to space. This would have led to a dry and volatile element-depleted Moon, which seemed to be consistent with previous analyses of lunar samples. But ongoing research about the Moon's chemistry is revealing that it may be wetter than initially thought, raising questions about this origin story. (2018-02-27)

High cognitive ability not a safeguard from conspiracies, paranormal beliefs
A University of Illinois at Chicago social psychologist reports on two studies that examined why some people are inclined to believe in various conspiracies and paranormal phenomena. (2017-11-13)

Popular psychology theories on self-esteem not backed up by serious research
Low self-esteem is associated with a greater risk of mental health problems such as eating disorders and depression. From a public health perspective, it is important for staff in various health-related professions to know about self-esteem. However, there is a vast difference between the research-based knowledge on self-esteem and the simplified popular psychology theories that are disseminated through books and motivational talks, reveals research from the University of Gothenburg. (2011-02-28)

Gamma-ray bursts may originate in star-forming regions
New findings from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Italian Space Agency's BeppoSAX satellite suggest that gamma- ray bursts, some of the most intense blasts in the universe, may be created in the same area where stars are born. (2001-04-03)

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