Popular Constipation News and Current Events

Popular Constipation News and Current Events, Constipation News Articles.
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Verifying that sorghum is a new safe grain for people with celiac disease
Strong new biochemical evidence exists showing that the cereal grain sorghum is a safe food for people with celiac disease, who must avoid wheat and certain other grains, scientists are reporting. Their study, which includes molecular evidence that sorghum lacks the proteins toxic to people with celiac disease, appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. (2013-04-03)

Ibuprofen better choice over oral morphine for pain relief in children after minor surgery
Widely available ibuprofen is a better choice for pain relief in children who have undergone minor orthopedic outpatient surgery, as it has fewer adverse effects compared with oral morphine, according to results from a clinical trial published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2017-10-10)

Spinal cord injury patients face many serious health problems besides paralysis
Spinal cord patients are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease; pneumonia; life-threatening blood clots; bladder, bowel and sexual dysfunction; constipation and other gastrointestinal problems; pressure ulcers; and chronic pain, according to a report published in the journal Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports. (2017-02-15)

Constipation most common cause of children's abdominal pain
Acute and chronic constipation together accounted for nearly half of all cases of acute abdominal pain in children treated at one hospital. The study also suggests that physicians should do a simple rectal examination for constipation when trying to determine the cause of abdominal pain in children. (2007-12-17)

Mangos help promote gut health
Eating mangos found to be more effective in relieving constipation and reducing intestinal inflammation than comparable amount of fiber. (2018-06-06)

Study shows bowel care is top concern for those with spinal cord injury
A study by SFU research Victoria Claydon reveals that bowel care, followed by sexual function, bladder function and pain were of key concern. Surprisingly, one of the lowest-ranked concerns was using a wheelchair for mobility. (2018-03-08)

Fecal transplantation to treat patients with Parkinson's disease: Hope or hype?
Amsterdam, NL, November 15, 2019 - Constipation is a common complaint in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Fecal microbiome transplantation (FMT) and pre- and probiotics are potential options for treating constipation and restoring the microbiome of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), but scientists warn that clinical data are scarce, and more research is needed before supporting their use. They present their findings in a review article in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease. (2019-11-15)

Despite crisis patients perceive opioids as superior and expect them for postsurgical pain
Even with concerns about addiction, side effects and the other risks of opioids dominating headlines, a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2018 annual meeting found people expect to be prescribed opioids and perceive them to be the most effective form of pain relief after surgery. Interestingly, other research presented at the meeting found opioids led to complications such as increased pain, poorer quality of life and dependence following back surgery. (2018-10-13)

1 in 3 older adults take something to help them sleep but many don't talk to their doctors
Sleep doesn't come easily for nearly half of older Americans, and more than a third have resorted to some sort of medication to help them doze off at night, a new national poll finds. But most said they hadn't talked to their doctor about their sleep, even though more than a third said their sleep posed a problem. Half believe -- incorrectly -- that sleep problems just come naturally with age. (2017-09-27)

Study suggests increase in adverse effects due to use of opioids in hospitalized children
New research to be presented during the American Academy of Pediatrics 2017 National Conference and Exhibition in Chicago suggests an urgent need for safer children's pain medications, with the number of hospitalized infants, children and teens who experienced adverse reactions to opioid painkillers increasing by more than half between 2003 and 2012. (2017-09-15)

Potential new pain killer drug developed by scientists at Leicester and Italy
A potential new pain-killing drug developed by medical scientists at the University of Leicester and Ferrara in Italy is to be discussed at a public lecture on March 20. (2007-03-16)

Magnetically applied MicroRNAs could one day help relieve constipation
Micro metal beads and magnets help deliver a biologic where it's needed to improve constipation or rectoanal incontinence in animal models of the disorders. (2018-01-16)

Comparison of smoking cessation therapies finds similar quit rates
Among adults motivated to quit smoking, 12 weeks of treatment with a nicotine patch, the drug varenicline, or combination nicotine replacement therapy produced no significant differences in confirmed rates of smoking abstinence at 26 or 52 weeks, raising questions about the current relative effectiveness of intense smoking cessation pharmacotherapies, according to a study in the Jan. 26 issue of JAMA. (2016-01-26)

Preschoolers with chronic constipation tend to be picky eaters
In the first study of its kind in the US, researchers found that normally developing preschool children with chronic constipation have underlying sensory issues that contribute to their difficulties with toileting behaviors. These children are often picky eaters who might be overly sensitive to food textures, tastes, or odors. They also might have an exaggerated response to noises, bright lights, or other sensory stimuli. Findings were published in the Journal of Pediatrics. (2019-04-18)

Scientists developed new mouse model of Hirschsprung's disease
Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Finland, have developed a new mouse model of Hirschsprung's disease and associated enterocolitis and shed light on the disease progression. (2019-01-07)

The effects of laxatives may provide new clues concerning Parkinson's disease
In a recent retrospective analysis, investigators discovered that the year-on-year increase in rigidity found in Parkinson's disease flattened off with the regular use of laxatives to manage constipation. (2016-05-19)

Genetic link to IBS identified in women
New research coordinated by Karolinska Institutet in Sweden links certain DNA variants to increased risk of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in women. The findings, published in the scientific journal Gastroenterology, might help explain why IBS is more common in women than in men. (2018-04-05)

Safer opioid drugs could treat pain and save lives
Opioid drugs are the most widely prescribed and effective type of pain medication. But they are highly addictive and have some unpleasant and potentially deadly side effects. Now a group of researchers, led by Dr. Laura Bohn at The Scripps Research Institute, may have found a way to make opioids safer by separating the drugs' pain relieving effects from their most dangerous side effect, respiratory suppression, which, in very severe cases, causes patients to stop breathing and to die. (2017-12-05)

Henry Ford Hospital study: Less prep needed for colonoscopy
Researchers at Henry Ford Hospital may have found a better way to prep patients for colonoscopy procedures so they no longer need to drink a gallon of prescribed fluids prior to the procedure. The study found that patients who took a pill that is FDA-approved for chronic constipation as part of the colonoscopy prep only needed to drink half of the liquid previously required to cleanse the bowels. (2010-05-02)

Study: Ibuprofen, acetaminophen more effective than opioids in treating dental pain
Ibuprofen and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) alone or in combination with acetaminophen are better at easing dental pain than opioids, according to new research conducted with the School of Dental Medicine at Case Western Reserve University. (2018-04-17)

Painkillers without dangerous side effects
Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have discovered a new way of developing painkillers. When used in an animal model, their prototype of a morphine-like molecule was able to produce substantial pain relief in inflamed tissues. However, healthy tissues remained unaffected, suggesting that the severe side effects currently associated with these types of painkillers might be avoided. This research has been published in the current issue of the journal Science*. (2017-03-03)

Mayo Clinic discovery is first step toward new bacteria-based constipation treatment
Genetically engineered bacteria are showing promise as a new treatment for constipation, researchers at the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine have discovered in a mouse study. The finding is significant in part because there are few approved constipation remedies on the market. The research is published in Cell Host & Microbe. (2018-06-13)

Intestinal bacteria alter gut and brain function: McMaster study
The goal of the study was to explore whether fecal microbiota from human IBS patients with diarrhea has the ability to influence gut and brain function in recipient mice. Using fecal transplants, researchers transferred microbiota from IBS patients with or without anxiety into germ-free mice. The mice went on to develop changes both in intestinal function and behavior reminiscent of the donor IBS patients, compared to mice that were transplanted with microbiota from healthy individuals. (2017-03-01)

Increased reaction to stress linked to gastrointestinal issues in children with autism
One in 45 American children lives with autism spectrum disorder, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Many of these children also have significant gastrointestinal issues, but the cause of these symptoms is unknown. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine suggest that the gastrointestinal issues in these individuals with autism may be related to an increased reaction to stress. The researchers hope the finding could lead to better treatments. (2017-01-04)

Opioid use by patients after rhinoplasty
Rhinoplasty patients used an average of nine of 20 to 30 hydrocodone-acetaminophen tablets prescribed for pain relief, suggesting that over-prescription of opioids after the common procedure could be a source available for diversion and misuse. (2017-11-09)

New treatment in development for irritable bowel syndrome with constipation
Researchers devised a plan to treat IBS with constipation by delivering chenodeoxycholic acid in a bilayered capsule, finding that this mode of delivery could decrease colon cramping and thus produce a better patient experience. (2020-12-08)

Research finds opioids may help chronic pain, a little
In a study published today by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), McMaster University researchers reviewed 96 clinical trials with more than 26,000 participants and found opioids provide only small improvements in pain, physical functioning and sleep quality compared to a placebo. (2018-12-18)

Slow-release morphine reduces level of intractable cough
Slow-release morphine helped a group of patients with long-term, treatment-resistant chronic cough reduce their daily cough score levels by 40 percent. (2007-02-15)

Certain alternative therapies may help patients with bowel disorders
A new review looks at the evidence behind the effectiveness of complementary or alternative therapies -- including probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, fiber, and herbal medicinal products -- for the treatment of bowel disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional constipation, and ulcerative colitis. (2016-10-03)

How do you assess pain in children who can't express themselves? New research identifies priorities in identifying pain in nonverbal children with medical complexity
Pain is a frequent problem for children with complex medical conditions -- but many of them are unable to communicate their pain verbally. For these children, nurses face a challenging task in assessing and determining the cause of pain, according to a study in the August issue of the American Journal of Nursing. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2018-08-02)

The involvement of the gut in Parkinson's disease: hype or hope?
There is growing evidence that at least in some patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), the disease may begin in the gut. Writing in a special supplement to the Journal of Parkinson's Disease, experts explore the last two decades of research about the gut-brain axis in PD and look ahead at the possible development and impact of these research areas in the next two decades. (2019-02-07)

Mechanism of black cohosh versus hot flashes revealed
The natural herb black cohosh is commonly used by women to treat menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, but the molecular mechanisms underlying its action have eluded scientists -- until now. (2006-12-21)

See-through fish aid scientists in autism-related breakthrough
University of Miami researchers have discovered a clue in the humble zebrafish's digestive tract that, one day, could help people on the autism spectrum alleviate one of the most common yet least studied symptoms of their disorder: gastrointestinal distress. (2019-02-06)

A small, daily dose of Viagra may reduce colorectal cancer risk
A small, daily dose of Viagra significantly reduces colorectal cancer risk in an animal model that is genetically predetermined to have the third leading cause of cancer death, scientists report. Viagra cut in half the formation of polyps, an abnormal and often asymptomatic clump of cells on the lining of the intestines that may become cancer, says Dr. Darren D. Browning, cancer researcher at the Georgia Cancer Center and Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. (2018-03-19)

Combination therapy advisable for bowel disorder IBS
The more abnormalities in intestinal and brain function that IBS sufferers have, the more severe their symptoms of this functional bowel disorder, and the more adversely their everyday life is affected. This is shown by a Sahlgrenska Academy study indicating that patients with IBS should get treatments for different abnormalities simultaneously, to improve both bowel function and signaling from the brain to the gut. (2019-05-15)

Drug improves tremors, involuntary movements in Parkinson patients
A drug used to treat epilepsy has been found to significantly improve tremors, motor fluctuations and other involuntary movements, or dyskinesias, in patients with Parkinson disease, according to a study published in the Jan. 2, 2007, issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2007-01-01)

Cedars-Sinai research shows antibiotic prevents ibs symptoms for weeks after final dose
A targeted antibiotic provides effective and long-lasting relief of Irritable Bowel Syndrome symptoms, according to the results of two multisite Phase III clinical trials designed by Cedars-Sinai researchers. Rifaximin is the first drug treatment for IBS that relieves symptoms while it's being administered and continues to benefit patients after they stop taking the drug. (2010-05-03)

Understanding endometriosis
About 10 percent of women worldwide suffer from endometriosis, a painful and debilitating disease with inadequate treatments. Currently, doctors don't know what causes the condition, which occurs when endometrial tissue escapes the uterus and forms lesions on other organs. But scientists are working hard to better understand the disease and develop new diagnostic tests and medicines, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (2018-10-31)

A moody gut often accompanies depression -- new study helps explain why
A new study suggests that depression and GI trouble sometimes spring from the same source -- low serotonin -- and identifies a potential treatment that could ease both conditions simultaneously. (2019-05-07)

Modified rye bread helps patients with irritable bowel syndrome
Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are often concerned that certain foods may trigger or worsen their symptoms, which can include abdominal pain, diarrhea, or constipation. In a new study, patients who ate rye bread that was low in so-called 'FODMAPs' (fermentable oligo- di- and mono-saccharides and polyols) experienced milder IBS symptoms than patients who ate normal rye bread. (2016-07-18)

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