Popular Consumer Research News and Current Events

Popular Consumer Research News and Current Events, Consumer Research News Articles.
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When brands tempt us to lie, cheat and steal
A new study shows that when consumers believe that a company is harmful in some way, then they feel justified participating in illegal activities, such as shoplifting, piracy or hacking to harm the company. (2017-11-29)

Using envy as a marketing tool can backfire
For decades, marketers have used envy to sell, attempting to cash in on consumers' desire to want what others have. But does it actually work? According to a new study from the UBC Sauder School of Business, employing envy can boost brands but it can also completely backfire -- and it depends on a consumer's self-esteem. (2018-06-05)

Consumers care about carbon footprint
How much do consumers care about the carbon footprint of the products they buy? Would they care more if the goods were labeled with emissions data? Does it matter at which stage in the lifecycle of a product the carbon is emitted? Research published in the International Journal of Environmental Policy and Decision Making offers a way to find out. (2016-02-26)

Census data can level the playing field for small businesses
Local governments and small businesses could save thousands of dollars a year in consulting and research fees if they just used information that's already publicly available, according to research from the University of Waterloo. (2018-04-03)

Nearly one out of five NSAID users exceed daily limit
Chances are you or someone you know has used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) within the last month. NSAIDs, such as Advil (ibuprofen), Aleve (naproxen) and Celebrex, are among the most commonly used medicines in the US. Now, for the first time, researchers have found that 15 percent of adult ibuprofen users exceed the maximum recommended dose of ibuprofen or other NSAIDs in a one-week period. (2018-01-26)

Too much technology may be killing beneficial bacteria
For years, scientists have known about silver's ability to kill harmful bacteria. Now, a University of Missouri researcher has found that silver nanoparticles also may destroy benign bacteria that are used to remove ammonia from wastewater treatment systems. The study was funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. (2008-04-29)

Will people eat relish made from 'waste' ingredients? Drexel study finds they may even prefer it
A new Drexel University study found strong potential for consumer acceptance of a new category of foods created from discarded ingredients. But the big question has been this: Will consumers accept products made from ingredients that were destined for the garbage? Would a person actually eat -- and pay for -- a granola bar made from spent brewing grains or a relish made from vegetables unfit for the supermarket? (2017-12-12)

When are consumers more likely to rely on feelings to make decisions?
Why do some consumers make choices based on their feelings instead of rational assessments? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers who consider themselves independent are more inclined to rely on feelings when making decisions. (2015-03-31)

Language used on credit card websites the hardest to understand
New research led by the University of East Anglia reveals how easy it is for consumers to understand the language used on personal finance websites. The study analyzed the text of websites for payday lenders, personal loans and credit cards in the UK and found that while payday loans sites are easier to read, all are difficult. Credit card websites are hardest to read and contain more complex terminology, though no significant differences are found between payday loans and personal loans. (2019-01-25)

Montana State University researchers publish study
'Fruit and vegetable desirability is lower in more rural built food environments of Montana, USA using the Produce Desirability(ProDes) Tool' was published in the journal Food Security. (2018-03-23)

Millennials are not adequately saving for retirement, MU study finds
In a new study, researchers from the University of Missouri found that only 37.2 percent of working millennials have retirement accounts, demonstrating a need for increased financial education for retirement. This study is among the first to examine the state of millennials' retirement savings. (2018-03-05)

Help for shopaholics: New test determines who's at risk for compulsive buying
Compulsive shopping can lead to financial problems, family conflicts, stress, depression, and loss of self-esteem. According to a new study, there may be more people engaged in compulsive buying than previously thought. (2008-09-15)

Saving money: Do consumers spend less if they think about the future?
Why is it so hard for consumers to save money? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are often impatient and do not think about the long-term consequences of spending money. (2015-03-31)

Exploring the truth behind organic production and food quality
As consumers we are increasingly disconnected from how our food is produced and supplied. New ideas and belief systems related to food are exploiting this disconnect and nowhere is this more true than organic food. In his new book, (2012-02-24)

Strawberry fields ripe for the picking
A team of researchers from the University of Maryland, Utah State University, and the US Department of Agriculture compared three different strawberry production systems over a two-year period (2003-2004) to determine which system was preferred by consumers who frequented pick-your-own farms. (2007-12-06)

Germs in the kitchen: Salmonella better known than Campylobacter
What health risks are consumers aware of? What are they concerned about? The answers to these questions are provided by the BfR Consumer Monitor, a representative population survey conducted regularly by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). On the one hand it reflects the public perception in Germany with regard to consumer health protection topics, while on the other hand it is an essential indicator for recognizing possible false estimations on the part of the general public early on. (2017-10-05)

Can a rude waiter make your food less tasty?
A new study shows that an individual's social class influences his or her response to poor service. This is because lower class individuals are more likely to have a holistic view of thinking, while higher class individuals more often have an analytical thinking pattern. (2017-11-29)

When should banks chase debts? New method could help them decide
Banks face financial risks and uncertainty when deciding when to chase consumers who default on their credit card payments and when to let them go. A new study from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin analyzes delinquent credit card user behaviors and develops a predictive model for sorting them into categories based on whether they are more or less likely to pay back their overdue debt. (2019-07-25)

Computers can take social media data and make marketing personas
Computers may be able to group consumers into marketing segments in real time just by observing how they respond to online videos and other social media data, according to a team of researchers. (2016-12-14)

Organic consumers mean business
Groundbreaking research from Aarhus BSS shows that organic consumers are standing fast and are buying more and more organic products following an increasingly predictable pattern. Coop Denmark sees great potential in the research results. (2017-09-25)

'Confusion and resistance' slows down UK smart meter rollout
Lack of consumer engagement, insufficient information, and inadequate attention to vulnerability has slowed down the UK rollout of energy smart meters, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Sussex. (2017-09-18)

How are ordinary consumers transforming the fashion business?
One of the most important shifts of the 21st century is the ability of consumers to participate in markets they love such as music and fashion. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research reveals how ordinary consumers have changed the inner workings of the fashion business by sharing their passion for fashion on a wide variety of websites. (2015-03-31)

One in four Americans suffer when exposed to common chemicals
University of Melbourne research reveals that one in four Americans report chemical sensitivity, with nearly half this group medically diagnosed with Multiple Chemical Sensitivities (MCS), suffering health problems from exposure to common chemical product. (2018-03-14)

'First do no harm: Internists say Congress needs to preserve protections in the ACA'
In a letter sent today to leaders in the House of Representatives and the Senate, the American College of Physicians (ACP), representing 148,000 internal medicine physicians (internists), related subspecialists, and medical students, implored Congress to not roll back coverage and protections established by the Affordable Care Act (ACA), and to evaluate any proposals to change it based on whether or not they would result in improvements in coverage, access and protections for patients. (2017-01-09)

Who's judging you based on brand choices?
A new study shows that people with a flexible mindset do not tend to judge others based on the brands they use, while people with a fixed mindset use brands to judge another person's character. (2017-09-29)

More than meets the tongue
Does orange juice taste sweeter if it's a brighter orange? A new study in the March issue of the Journal of Consumer Research finds that the color of a drink can influence how we think it tastes. In fact, the researchers found that color was more of an influence on how taste was perceived than quality or price information. (2007-02-12)

Sustainable choices on palm oil must be easier for consumers, says new study
Consumer goods companies and retailers need to be upfront about where palm oil in their products comes from to relieve consumers of the burden of making sustainable choices. That is a key finding of new research from the University of Cambridge (UK). It publishes today in Environmental Research Letters. (2019-01-03)

A world without brick-and-mortar stores? Even avid online shoppers say, 'no, thanks'
The majority of consumers, even those who prefer online shopping, think the extinction of brick-and-mortar stores would be bad for society, according to a new University of Arizona-led study that explores consumers' perceptions of today's transforming retail environment. (2018-11-14)

Given more information about how wine is made, consumers less likely to pay for organic
Consumers are more willing to pay for wine that comes with an organic or organic grape label but providing information about certification standards and organic production practices reduces consumer willingness to pay for all wines. (2019-06-26)

Seabed mining could destroy ecosystems
Mining on the ocean floor could do irreversible damage to deep-sea ecosystems, says a new study of seabed mining proposals around the world. (2018-01-22)

Money-saving health plans do little to curb spending on unnecessary medical services
Claims for unnecessary medical services remain steady, despite changes in the insurance market designed to place more spending decisions in consumers' hands. (2017-12-07)

Study: Stereotypes about race and responsibility persist in bankruptcy system
Bankruptcy attorneys have little knowledge of the racial disparities that exist within the bankruptcy system, relying instead on common stereotypes about race, responsibility and debt, according to research co-written by Robert M. Lawless, the Max L. Rowe Professor of Law at Illinois and a leading consumer credit and bankruptcy expert. (2017-11-29)

Establishing a universal forensic DNA database
In the wake of recent high-profile successes catching criminals using publicly-accessible genomic data, results that build momentum for this approach, James Hazel and colleagues argue for the establishment of a universal forensic DNA database for law enforcement purposes. (2018-11-22)

Cotton tip applicators are sending 34 kids to the emergency department each day
A study conducted by Nationwide Children's Hospital researchers found that over a 21-year period from 1990 through 2010, an estimated 263,000 children younger than 18 years of age were treated in US hospital emergency departments for cotton tip applicator related ear injuries -- that's about 12,500 annually, or about 34 injuries every day. (2017-05-08)

Study unlocks why public appeals may fall flat with some would-be donors
To give or not to give: sometimes the answer is in the question, researchers into human behaviour and charitable giving have found. The study, led by a researcher from Western University in Canada, suggests that sometimes the 'ask' needs to suit the potential donors' sense of independence or interdependence. (2017-09-28)

Telemedicine aided people hit by hurricanes Harvey and Irma
Telemedicine has been used during disasters for many years, but providing such care directly to consumers only has become viable because of the widespread growth of smartphones and the creation of services that allow consumers to directly access thousands of US physicians. A new study of the aftermath of hurricanes Harvey and Irma finds that direct-to-consumer telemedicine is a viable way to deliver medical care in the days following a natural disaster. (2018-04-25)

How plant breeding technologies could make fruits and vegetables more exciting to eat
Forget vegetables with dull colors and fuzzy skin or fruits that lack of flavor -- the produce aisle of the future could offer plant products that are designed for creative cooks and fussy eaters. In a review article published July 19 in Trends in Plant Science, two food researchers describe how new breeding technologies have the potential to enhance the shape, size, color, and health benefits of produce, as well as to inform conventional breeding programs. (2018-07-19)

Materialism and loneliness: Is there really a vicious cycle?
Despite being much-maligned, materialism is not always bad for consumers. Loneliness may cause materialism, but the opposite is not necessarily true, according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research. (2013-07-26)

Researchers examine how errors affect credibility of online reviews
Shoppers increasingly consult online reviews before making holiday purchases. But how do they decide which reviewers to trust? Recently published research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business at IUPUI shows that consumer trust in online reviews is influenced by spelling errors and typos. But how much those errors influence each consumer depends on the type of error and that consumer's general tendency to trust others. (2017-12-11)

What does marketing have to do with ill-advised consumer behavior?
A biological account of human behavior can benefit human welfare and marketing can play a critical role in facilitating public understanding and acceptance of biological causation. (2021-01-13)

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