Popular Contraception News and Current Events

Popular Contraception News and Current Events, Contraception News Articles.
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One in 4 women at sexual health clinics reports coercion over their reproductive lives
As many as one in four women attending sexual and reproductive healthcare services say they are not allowed to take control of their own reproductive lives, reveals a review of the available evidence, published today in BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health. (2019-01-07)

Women choose more effective contraception when cost not an issue
When cost isn't an issue, women will choose more effective, long-term methods of contraception, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. (2018-03-15)

Women with intellectual and developmental disabilities have almost double the rate of repeat pregnancy
Women with intellectual and developmental disabilities have nearly double the rate of having another baby within a year of delivering compared to women without such disabilities, according to a new study published in CMAJ. (2018-08-13)

Are women with epilepsy using effective contraception?
In the largest study of contraceptive practices of women with epilepsy, 30 percent did not use highly effective contraception despite being at higher risk of having children with fetal malformations due to the anti-epilepsy medications they take. (2016-02-16)

Contraception influences sexual desire in committed relationships
How often women in heterosexual couples desire sex depends on how committed the relationship is and what type of birth control the woman uses. (2016-12-08)

Few California retailers offer pharmacist-prescribed birth control, despite law
A new law took effect in California last year allowing pharmacists to prescribe birth control, but few of the state's pharmacies are actually offering this service, according to new UC Berkeley research. (2017-12-12)

BU: Marijuana use does not lower chances of getting pregnant
Marijuana use -- by either men or women -- does not appear to lower a couple's chances of getting pregnant, according to a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers. (2018-01-22)

Dimethandrolone undecanoate shows promise as a male birth control pill
A new birth control pill for men appears to be safe when used daily for a month, with hormone responses consistent with effective contraception, study researchers say. Their study results, in 83 men, will be presented Sunday at ENDO 2018, the Endocrine Society's 100th annual meeting in Chicago, Ill. (2018-03-18)

Spay and neuter for dogs: Avoiding the health consequences
In the United States, spaying or neutering a dog has become standard practice to reduce pet overpopulation. Yet recent research has shed light on the long-term health impacts of the lack of natural hormonal balance resulting from removal of the gonads. This research article includes details on alternatives to traditional spay and neuter and encourages an individualized approach to determining the best contraceptive option for each dog. (2018-10-30)

Ohio State study reveals no link between hormonal birth control and depression
The vast majority of women will use some method of contraception during their lifetime. Despite there being 37 million in the United States who are currently on birth control, many still worry about potential side effects. (2018-02-26)

A summary of electrospun nanofibers as drug delivery system
Recently, electrospun polymeric nanofibers have proven to be an interesting strategy for drug delivery systems application.This review presents an overview of the reported drugs loaded into polymeric nanofibers, to be used as drug delivery systems. (2018-12-14)

Changes in birth rates after elimination of cost sharing for contraception
Researchers assessed changes in birth rates by income level among commercially insured women before and after the elimination of cost sharing for contraception under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. (2020-11-06)

Sexual behavior of the university students
The study used a sample of students from the University of Seville, who belonged to all the various departments. These students completed a questionnaire that consisted of three parts: sociodemographic variables, sexual and contraceptive experiences, and a last part about knowledge of and attitudes towards sexually transmitted infections, as well as about the use of contraceptive methods. (2018-03-05)

Better-educated men = healthier women and mothers in the developing world
In much of Africa and Asia, the more schooling a man has, the more likely his partner will take birth control or seek medical help in pregnancy, according to Canadian researchers. (2018-01-30)

Revised trainee guidelines permit full spectrum of 'conscientious objection'
Trainee doctors and nurses can opt out of providing certain aspects of sexual and reproductive healthcare, but only if they can ensure that patients' needs are still being met, whatever their own personal beliefs, say new guidelines on 'conscientious objection' from the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare. (2017-12-07)

Information on reproductive health outcomes lacking in Catholic hospitals
As Catholic health care systems expand nationwide, little is known about the reproductive outcomes of their patients compared to patients in other settings, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2018-12-06)

Fertility can hinge on swimming conditions in the uterus
A Washington State University researcher has found that the uterus in female mice contains enzymes that can break down semen, making it less gel-like, more watery, and therefore easier to swim in. This interplay between semen and the female reproductive tract can impact fertility. (2017-04-19)

Study shows barriers exist for Texas adolescents seeking emergency contraception
In the US, emergency contraception in the form of levonorgestrel 1.5mg oral tablet has been available over-the-counter for over 10 years and without an age limit for five years. Texas has the fifth highest teen pregnancy rate and highest rate of repeat teen pregnancy in the US. Access to contraceptive services for these adolescents can be challenging. This study evaluated levonorgestrel emergency contraception availability in Texas and assessed knowledge of pharmacy staff about this medication. (2018-05-05)

Well-child visits are effective time to help moms, study shows
In an effort to improve birth outcomes, well-child visits provide an opportune time to deliver basic screenings and health care interventions for new mothers between pregnancies, according to a new study led by UPMC. (2018-03-15)

The Lancet: First randomised trial finds no substantial difference in risk of acquiring HIV for three different forms of contraception
A randomised trial of more than 7,800 African women found that a type of contraceptive injection (intramuscular depot medroxyprogesterone acetate -- DMPA-IM) posed no substantially increased risk of HIV acquisition when compared with a copper intrauterine device (IUD) and a levonorgestrel (LNG) implant. The results of this first ever randomised trial in the area, published in The Lancet, counter 30 years of epidemiology research suggesting a potential association between some types of contraceptives and risk of acquiring HIV. (2019-06-13)

New study results from Uganda strengthen the case for contraceptive self-injection
Results from a PATH study in Uganda, now published in the journal Contraception, show that self-injection of subcutaneous DMPA may help women to continue using injectable contraception longer than women who receive traditional intramuscular injections from providers. Over the course of a 12-month study period, 81 percent of DMPA self-injection participants continued to use the product. Meanwhile, 65 percent of the 600 women who received injections from a health worker continued using the product. (2018-04-12)

Emergency contraception not as accessible as it should be, says CU Anschutz study
Efforts to remove barriers to accessing emergency contraception (EC) scored victories in 2013, when the US Food and Drug Administration removed age restrictions on over-the-counter sales of the levonogestrel drug Plan B. (2017-09-22)

'Domestic gag rule' will negatively impact women's health care
Texas study points to adverse impact of proposed federal title x guidelines on abortion counseling and referrals. (2018-10-11)

Nephrologists may need more training in women's health issues
Nephrologists often lack confidence in managing women's health issues that may be related to kidney disease. Results from the study will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2018 Oct. 23-28 at the San Diego Convention Center. (2018-10-26)

Male contraceptive compound stops sperm without affecting hormones
A new study published today in the journal PLOS ONE details how a compound called EP055 binds to sperm proteins to significantly slow the overall mobility of the sperm without affecting hormones, making EP055 a potential 'male pill' without side effects. (2018-04-19)

First trial of dapivirine ring with both ARV and contraceptive finds no safety concerns
In the first clinical study of a vaginal ring that releases the antiretroviral drug dapivirine as well as a contraceptive hormone, there were no safety concerns and the ring was well-tolerated. The ring is designed to provide protection against both HIV infection and unintended pregnancy for 90 days at a time. Given the encouraging results, researchers have already launched a second Phase I trial of the dual-purpose ring. (2018-10-24)

Access to contraception not 'silver bullet' to stem population growth in Africa
The population of sub-Saharan Africa is set to double by 2050, yet a new study challenges a common misconception that this is caused solely by inadequate family planning. (2019-07-18)

Teen moms more likely to have premature babies
Pregnant women aged 14-17 years are at higher risk of preterm birth and of having a child with low birth weight, especially if they are having their second child. Researchers writing in the open-access journal BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth demonstrate this association and call for better health education and the promotion of contraception after a teenager has given birth for the first time. (2010-07-08)

Different types of ovarian cancer have different causes
The more children a woman has or whether a woman has had her fallopian tubes cut lowers the risk of different types of ovarian cancer to different levels, according to new research presented at the 2015 National Cancer Research Institute Cancer Conference Tuesday. (2015-11-02)

Tackling health problems in the young is crucial for their children's future
A child's growth and development is affected by the health and lifestyles of their parents before pregnancy - even going back to adolescence - according to a new study. The findings show that tackling obesity, mental health, poor nutrition and substance abuse in young people before they become parents is essential for the best possible start to life for their future children.  (2018-02-21)

FDA clears Berlex Laboratories' Mirena (R), new form of long-acting contraception meets need for U.S. women
U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved MIRENA (R)(levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system), a convenient, innovative contraceptive that is as effective in preventing pregnancy as tubal ligation (better than 99 percent) and lasts for five years or until removed. Two million women worldwide use MIRENA. Available for 10 years in Europe, MIRENA will be available in the U.S. in the first quarter of 2001. (2000-12-06)

Overpopulation of free-roaming cats drives hunt for better contraceptive
Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the Alliance for Contraception in Cats and Dogs embarked on a project to determine if GonaCon™, a nonsurgical contraceptive used in some wildlife species, might provide a solution for overpopulation of free-roaming cats. The results, unfortunately, were not as promising for fertility control of the cats as previously indicated. (2018-05-08)

Sexual behavior in Germany
A sexual history and consultation in the practice setting can contribute to counteracting the spread of sexually transmitted infections. This is the result of a representative survey that questioned 2524 persons about their sexual practices and sexual contacts outside their main relationships, as well as about contraceptive measures, whose results Julia Haversath and coauthors summarize in the current issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2017; 114: 544-50). (2017-09-18)

Primary care physicians nationwide face clinical ethical conflicts with religious hospitals
Nearly 1 in 10 primary care physicians has experienced a conflict with a religiously-affiliated hospital or practice over religious policies for patient care. Most feel that when clinical judgment conflicts with religious hospital policy, physicians should refer patients to another institution. (2010-04-09)

Experts weigh risks of epilepsy drug in pregnancy, as EU considers safety recommendations
As the European Commission considers whether to introduce a partial ban on use of the epilepsy drug valproate in pregnancy over risks to unborn babies, researchers in The BMJ discuss the arguments and the implications for patients and healthcare professionals. (2018-04-18)

Many US women don't realize they're seeking reproductive care at Catholic hospitals
More than one-third of women who go to a Catholic hospital for reproductive care aren't aware they're seeking obstetrical and gynecological care at a facility that may have limited health care options due to its religious affiliation. (2018-06-05)

New estimates of modern contraceptive use in the world's poorest countries
Statisticians Leontine Alkema, Niamh Cahill and Chuchu Wei at UMass Amherst, with others, release new estimates and projections of modern contraceptive prevalence (mCPR) and other family planning outcomes for the 69 poorest countries of the world. They are the focus of the Family Planning 2020 (FP2020) initiative, a global partnership that supports the rights of women and girls to decide, freely and for themselves, whether, when and how many children they want to have. (2017-12-04)

How were oral contraceptives, concurrent depressive symptoms associated among adolescents, young women?
This observational study examined associations between depressive symptoms and oral contraceptive use in adolescents and young women and how those associations might differ by age. Oral contraceptive use has been associated with increased risk for subsequent depression in adolescents. The study included about 1,000 girls and young women in the Netherlands who completed at least 1 of 4 assessments about their oral contraceptive use and depressive symptoms at ages 16, 19, 22 and 25. (2019-10-02)

Trump's policy changes put women's sexual and reproductive health at risk, argues expert
Donald Trump's sexual and reproductive health policy changes threaten women in the USA and across the world, warns an expert in the Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care. (2017-03-02)

Efforts are needed to help pregnant women with diabetes
Researchers who analyzed data from the UK's National Pregnancy in Diabetes Audit found concerning shortcomings in pregnancy preparation and prenatal care for women with diabetes. In addition, significant clinic-to-clinic variation across the England and Wales suggests opportunities for improvement. (2018-02-15)

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