Popular Contraceptive News and Current Events

Popular Contraceptive News and Current Events, Contraceptive News Articles.
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One in 4 women at sexual health clinics reports coercion over their reproductive lives
As many as one in four women attending sexual and reproductive healthcare services say they are not allowed to take control of their own reproductive lives, reveals a review of the available evidence, published today in BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health. (2019-01-07)

Women choose more effective contraception when cost not an issue
When cost isn't an issue, women will choose more effective, long-term methods of contraception, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. (2018-03-15)

Are women with epilepsy using effective contraception?
In the largest study of contraceptive practices of women with epilepsy, 30 percent did not use highly effective contraception despite being at higher risk of having children with fetal malformations due to the anti-epilepsy medications they take. (2016-02-16)

FDA independence in an age of partisan politics
Unlike other federal agencies, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) -- the oldest federal consumer protection agency -- has been increasingly subjected to creeping politicization and a progressive loss of independence under the glare of partisan politics. (2019-05-16)

Few California retailers offer pharmacist-prescribed birth control, despite law
A new law took effect in California last year allowing pharmacists to prescribe birth control, but few of the state's pharmacies are actually offering this service, according to new UC Berkeley research. (2017-12-12)

Contraception influences sexual desire in committed relationships
How often women in heterosexual couples desire sex depends on how committed the relationship is and what type of birth control the woman uses. (2016-12-08)

Dimethandrolone undecanoate shows promise as a male birth control pill
A new birth control pill for men appears to be safe when used daily for a month, with hormone responses consistent with effective contraception, study researchers say. Their study results, in 83 men, will be presented Sunday at ENDO 2018, the Endocrine Society's 100th annual meeting in Chicago, Ill. (2018-03-18)

Conception during IUD use increases risks to mother and infant -- Ben-Gurion University study
;We believe this is the first report tracking children born to mothers using an IUD over a long timeframe,; says Dr. Gali Pariente, a faculty member of the BGU Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, BGU Faculty of Health Sciences and a clinical instructor at Soroka. 'Working with a large sample over 23 years allowed us to investigate obstetric parameters that hadn't been examined previously in large groups.' (2018-01-08)

Why are women more prone to knee injuries than men?
Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found that women who take the birth control pill, which lessen and stabilize estrogen levels, were less likely to suffer serious knee injuries. The findings are currently available in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, the official journal of the American College of Sports Medicine. (2016-03-18)

Sexual behavior of the university students
The study used a sample of students from the University of Seville, who belonged to all the various departments. These students completed a questionnaire that consisted of three parts: sociodemographic variables, sexual and contraceptive experiences, and a last part about knowledge of and attitudes towards sexually transmitted infections, as well as about the use of contraceptive methods. (2018-03-05)

Common birth control shot linked to risk of HIV infection
Transitioning away from a popular contraceptive shot known as DMPA could help protect women in Sub-Saharan Africa and other high-risk regions from becoming infected with HIV, according to a research review published in the Endocrine Society's journal Endocrine Reviews. (2018-01-04)

Revised trainee guidelines permit full spectrum of 'conscientious objection'
Trainee doctors and nurses can opt out of providing certain aspects of sexual and reproductive healthcare, but only if they can ensure that patients' needs are still being met, whatever their own personal beliefs, say new guidelines on 'conscientious objection' from the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare. (2017-12-07)

Oral contraceptive use associated with increased risk of breast cancer
Investigators from the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University School of Medicine have reported that African-American women who use oral contraceptives have a greater likelihood of developing breast cancer than nonusers. The study results, recently published on-line in Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, were based on data from the Black Women's Health Study, a large follow-up study of 59,000 African-American women from across the US conducted by investigators at the Slone Epidemiology Center since 1995. (2010-08-03)

Study shows barriers exist for Texas adolescents seeking emergency contraception
In the US, emergency contraception in the form of levonorgestrel 1.5mg oral tablet has been available over-the-counter for over 10 years and without an age limit for five years. Texas has the fifth highest teen pregnancy rate and highest rate of repeat teen pregnancy in the US. Access to contraceptive services for these adolescents can be challenging. This study evaluated levonorgestrel emergency contraception availability in Texas and assessed knowledge of pharmacy staff about this medication. (2018-05-05)

50 years ago, Clomid gave birth to the era of assisted reproduction
In the journal Fertility and Sterility, Dr. Eli Adashi writes a history and appreciation of the wonder drug Clomid, which radically changed what doctors could do for couples struggling to have children. (2017-09-13)

The Lancet: First randomised trial finds no substantial difference in risk of acquiring HIV for three different forms of contraception
A randomised trial of more than 7,800 African women found that a type of contraceptive injection (intramuscular depot medroxyprogesterone acetate -- DMPA-IM) posed no substantially increased risk of HIV acquisition when compared with a copper intrauterine device (IUD) and a levonorgestrel (LNG) implant. The results of this first ever randomised trial in the area, published in The Lancet, counter 30 years of epidemiology research suggesting a potential association between some types of contraceptives and risk of acquiring HIV. (2019-06-13)

New study results from Uganda strengthen the case for contraceptive self-injection
Results from a PATH study in Uganda, now published in the journal Contraception, show that self-injection of subcutaneous DMPA may help women to continue using injectable contraception longer than women who receive traditional intramuscular injections from providers. Over the course of a 12-month study period, 81 percent of DMPA self-injection participants continued to use the product. Meanwhile, 65 percent of the 600 women who received injections from a health worker continued using the product. (2018-04-12)

Short gaps between pregnancies linked to complications
Women with a very short interval between pregnancies are at an increased risk of complications such as premature birth, neonatal death, and low birth weight, say researchers in this week's BMJ. (2003-08-07)

Racial or ethnic discrimination impacts Latinas' satisfaction with contraception services
Young Latina women who have experienced racial or ethnic discrimination are less satisfied overall with their contraceptive care, which could affect their access to more effective contraceptives, a new study from Oregon State University has found. (2018-05-10)

First trial of dapivirine ring with both ARV and contraceptive finds no safety concerns
In the first clinical study of a vaginal ring that releases the antiretroviral drug dapivirine as well as a contraceptive hormone, there were no safety concerns and the ring was well-tolerated. The ring is designed to provide protection against both HIV infection and unintended pregnancy for 90 days at a time. Given the encouraging results, researchers have already launched a second Phase I trial of the dual-purpose ring. (2018-10-24)

Overpopulation of free-roaming cats drives hunt for better contraceptive
Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the Alliance for Contraception in Cats and Dogs embarked on a project to determine if GonaCon™, a nonsurgical contraceptive used in some wildlife species, might provide a solution for overpopulation of free-roaming cats. The results, unfortunately, were not as promising for fertility control of the cats as previously indicated. (2018-05-08)

Sexual behavior in Germany
A sexual history and consultation in the practice setting can contribute to counteracting the spread of sexually transmitted infections. This is the result of a representative survey that questioned 2524 persons about their sexual practices and sexual contacts outside their main relationships, as well as about contraceptive measures, whose results Julia Haversath and coauthors summarize in the current issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2017; 114: 544-50). (2017-09-18)

Africa At The Turning Point
Sub-Saharan Africa is at a critical turning point in its efforts to address the dual challenge of rapid population growth and poor reproductive health, according to a new Population Action International study, entitled (1998-05-03)

FDA clears Berlex Laboratories' Mirena (R), new form of long-acting contraception meets need for U.S. women
U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved MIRENA (R)(levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system), a convenient, innovative contraceptive that is as effective in preventing pregnancy as tubal ligation (better than 99 percent) and lasts for five years or until removed. Two million women worldwide use MIRENA. Available for 10 years in Europe, MIRENA will be available in the U.S. in the first quarter of 2001. (2000-12-06)

Oral contraceptives could impair women's recognition of complex emotions
Women who take the pill are nearly 10 percent worse at recognizing subtle expressions of complex emotions like pride or contempt, according to research published in Frontiers in Neuroscience. Previous research suggests the relationship is causal, but the impact on women's ability to form intimate relationships is unknown. (2019-02-11)

Does concussion recovery and symptom severity differ between men and women?
A new study comparing male and female athletes examined whether there are clear sex-related differences in post-concussion symptom severity and length of recovery. (2018-04-19)

Teen pregnancy and birth rates at an all time low in Minn., UMN Medical School report shows
Pregnancy and birth rates continue to decline for 15-19-year-olds in Minnesota, with rates decreasing the most among youth from communities of color. The 2018 Minnesota Adolescent Sexual Health Report from the University of Minnesota Medical School's Healthy Youth Development - Prevention Research Center (HYD - PRC) attributes the decline to a combination of delayed sexual activity and an increase in use of highly effective contraceptive methods among teens. (2018-06-07)

New estimates of modern contraceptive use in the world's poorest countries
Statisticians Leontine Alkema, Niamh Cahill and Chuchu Wei at UMass Amherst, with others, release new estimates and projections of modern contraceptive prevalence (mCPR) and other family planning outcomes for the 69 poorest countries of the world. They are the focus of the Family Planning 2020 (FP2020) initiative, a global partnership that supports the rights of women and girls to decide, freely and for themselves, whether, when and how many children they want to have. (2017-12-04)

Male trout are now real males again
The media has been telling us about feminised male fish for decades, but now researchers at SDU announce that this feminisation has completely disappeared in certain parts of Denmark. (2017-11-27)

Pregnancy complications linked to heightened risk of heart disease and stroke in later life
Pregnancy complications such as miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, diabetes in pregnancy (gestational diabetes) and pre-term birth are linked to a heightened risk of heart disease in later life, suggests an overarching (umbrella) analysis of data published by The BMJ today. (2020-10-07)

New pharmacon allows testicular tumors to shrink
A new active pharmaceutical ingredient may help against severe forms of testicular cancer, which only respond inadequately to other therapies. In mice, the substance kills degenerated cells and allows testicular tumors to shrink. Researchers at the University of Bonn were able to demonstrate this in a recent study. However, first clinical trials are still pending. The work has now been published in the 'Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine'. (2016-12-28)

Research shows links between explicit material and early sexual behaviour
Elysia said: 'Our study examined how exposure to sexually explicit material, defined as any media depicting uncensored sexual behavior, can influence the adoption of sexually risky behavior. Sexually risky behavior was defined as behavior that puts people at high risk of contracting a sexually transmitted infection. For this research, these behaviors referred to a lack of contraceptive use and having multiple sexual partners.' (2017-09-07)

Prospective birth control pill for men has its origin in an arrow poison
Women have many options for oral contraceptives that are safe, effective and reversible, but despite decades of research, men have none. Now, scientists report a rat study in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Chemistry that shows they finally have a good lead for a male birth control pill. It's based on ouabain, a plant extract that African warriors and hunters traditionally used as a heart-stopping poison on their arrows. (2018-01-17)

Study finds key brain region smaller in birth control pill users
Researchers studying the brain found that women taking oral contraceptives, commonly known as birth control pills, had significantly smaller hypothalamus volume, compared to women not taking the pill, according to a new study. (2019-12-04)

Trump's policy changes put women's sexual and reproductive health at risk, argues expert
Donald Trump's sexual and reproductive health policy changes threaten women in the USA and across the world, warns an expert in the Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care. (2017-03-02)

Female sex hormones play a vital role in defense against sexually transmitted diseases
Charu Kaushic, assistant professor and supervisor of the studies, says the implication of this work is quite significant. (2005-02-18)

How were oral contraceptives, concurrent depressive symptoms associated among adolescents, young women?
This observational study examined associations between depressive symptoms and oral contraceptive use in adolescents and young women and how those associations might differ by age. Oral contraceptive use has been associated with increased risk for subsequent depression in adolescents. The study included about 1,000 girls and young women in the Netherlands who completed at least 1 of 4 assessments about their oral contraceptive use and depressive symptoms at ages 16, 19, 22 and 25. (2019-10-02)

Youth consider mobile health units a safe place for sexual health services
Mobile health units bring important medical services to communities across the country. A new study indicates that mobile health units may provide a new approach for offering sexual health education and services to adolescents. (2018-02-07)

Birth control pills increase risk of ischemic stroke
Oral contraceptives increase the risk of ischemic stroke, but this risk is very small among women who do not have other stroke risk factors, according to a report in the journal MedLink Neurology by Loyola Medicine stroke specialists. (2018-03-05)

Contraceptive pill linked to lowered risk of rheumatoid arthritis
Taking the contraceptive pill, particularly for seven or more consecutive years, is linked to a lowered risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis, finds research published online in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases. (2017-08-17)

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