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Popular Coral Reefs News and Current Events, Coral Reefs News Articles.
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Marine oil snow
Marine snow is the phenomena of flakes of falling organic material and biological debris cascading down a water column like snowflakes. (2019-06-11)
Sudden aging
Coralline red algae have existed for 130 million years, in other words since the Cretaceous Period, the time of the dinosaurs. (2019-01-16)
Following the light
Considering that light is the driving force behind the growth and productivity of reef ecosystems, scientists are interested in understanding the relationship between primary productivity and varying light conditions. (2019-02-05)
Reef engineers
The next time you find yourself luxuriating in some exotic, Instagrammable vacation spot, thank a parrotfish. (2019-04-30)
Doubling down
Over the recent decade, total human impacts to the world's oceans have, on average, nearly doubled and could double again in the next decade without adequate action. (2019-08-13)
Rigs to reefs
Offshore oil platforms have an immense presence, physically, financially and environmentally. (2019-01-31)
Good neighbors
In the animal kingdom, food access is among the biggest drivers of habitat preference. (2019-01-22)
Nature-based solutions can prevent $50 billion in Gulf Coast flood damages
While coastal development and climate change are increasing the risk of flooding for communities along the US Gulf Coast, restoration of marshes and oyster reefs are among the most cost-effective solutions for reducing those risks, according to a new study. (2018-04-11)
Corals in Singapore likely to survive sea-level rise: NUS study
Marine scientists from the National University of Singapore found that coral species in Singapore's sedimented and turbid waters are unlikely to be impacted by accelerating sea-level rise (2019-07-01)
Over half a million corals destroyed by port of Miami dredging, study finds
A team of researchers including scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, published new findings that reveal significant damage to Miami's coral reefs from the 16-month dredging operation at the Port of Miami that began in 2013. (2019-05-30)
Coral reefs suffering in Philippines despite outlawing damaging fishing practices
Some of the fishing methods used in today's small-scale fisheries are causing more damage to coral reefs than ever, a new UBC study has found. (2018-03-16)
Fungi the cause of many outbreaks of disease but mostly ignored
Many people, scientists among them, are largely unaware of the roles fungi play in the world around us. (2008-07-01)
The astounding genome of the dinoflagellate
Dinoflagellates live free-floating in the ocean or symbiotically with corals, serving up -- or as -- lunch to a host of mollusks, tiny fish and coral species. (2015-11-05)
Climate change efforts should focus on ocean-based solutions
The first broad-scale assessment of ocean-based measures to reduce atmospheric CO2, counteract ocean warming and/or reduce ocean acidification and sea-level rise shows their high potential to mitigate climate change and its impacts. (2018-10-04)
A dolphin diet
The health of dolphin populations worldwide depends on sustained access to robust food sources. (2017-08-02)
New species of marine spider emerges at low tide to remind scientists of Bob Marley
It was 02:00h on 11 January 2009 when the sea along the coastline of Australia's 'Sunshine State' of Queensland receded to such an extent that it exposed a population of water-adapted spiders. (2017-12-22)
Bad news for Nemo
The beloved anemone fish popularized by the movies 'Finding Nemo' and 'Finding Dory' don't have the genetic capacity to adapt to rapid changes in their environment, according to a new study. (2019-11-27)
The Caribbean is stressed out
Forty percent of the world's 2.5 billion people live in coastal cities and towns. (2017-12-28)
Seagrass biodiversity is both a goal and a means for restoration
Planting multiple seagrass species, rather than a single species, could be better for restoring damaged coastal ecosystems in Indonesia's Coral Triangle. (2017-11-08)
Changes in reef latitude
Researchers have hypothesized that nutrient levels rather than temperature are the main factor controlling the latitudinal bounds of coral reefs, but the issue remains controversial. (2006-02-22)
How the color-changing hogfish 'sees' with its skin
The hogfish can go from white to reddish in milliseconds as it adjusts to shifting conditions in the ocean. (2018-03-12)
Fixing the role of nitrogen in coral bleaching
A unique investigation highlights how excess nitrogen can trigger coral bleaching in the absence of heat stress. (2017-06-05)
Deeper understanding of species roles in ecosystems
A species' traits define the role it plays in the ecosystem in which it lives -- this is the conclusion of a study carried out by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden. (2018-04-12)
Herring larvae could benefit from an acidifying ocean
Excess CO2 in the atmosphere is making the oceans more acidic. (2018-03-29)
Scientists look to the Bahamas as a model for coral reef conservation
One of the greatest challenges facing marine ecologists today is finding innovative ways to reverse the rapid decline of coral reef ecosystems around the world. (2006-02-20)
New SDSU study examines role of sea urchins on California kelp
California sheephead and spiny lobsters may be helping control sea urchin populations in Southern California kelp forests, where sea otters -- a top urchin predator -- have long been missing, according to a new San Diego State University (SDSU) study published in the journal Ecology. (2019-03-14)
Extinction by asteroid a rarity
Results presented at 2008 Joint Annual Meeting argue in favor of a (2008-10-06)
NASA measured rainfall from Fehi's remnants in New Zealand
The remnants of Tropical Cyclone Fehi brought rain to New Zealand before it fizzled out. (2018-02-02)
VIMS study identifies tipping point for oyster restoration
Study shows that reefs built to reach a foot or more above the bottom develop into healthy, self-sustaining ecosystems, while those rebuilt at lower heights are quickly buried by sediment. (2017-11-13)
Smithsonian coral biodiversity survey of Panama's Pearl Islands
A comprehensive survey of coral biodiversity in Panama's Las Perlas Archipelago, published in the journal Environmental Conservation by researchers from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and their colleagues, has resulted in clear conservation recommendations for a new coastal management plan. (2008-07-07)
Hurricanes Irma and Maria temporarily altered choruses of land and sea animals
Audio recordings of Hurricanes Irma and Maria's passage over Puerto Rico document how the calls of coastal critters changed in response to the deadly storms. (2018-02-15)
Six new sponge species and new symbiotic associations from the Indonesian coral triangle
The Indonesian coral reefs, located in the so-called coral triangle, are considered amongst the richest and most biodiverse places on Earth. (2017-09-18)
Surprising killer of southeastern salt marshes: Common sea snails
From South Carolina to Texas, salt marshes have experienced a massive die-off in recent years, threatening fisheries and leaving coastal areas vulnerable to flooding. (2005-12-15)
A brave new world for coral reefs
It is not too late to save coral reefs, but we must act now. (2017-05-31)
How corals adapt to day and night
Researchers have uncovered a gene in corals that responds to day/night cycles, which provides some tantalizing clues into how symbiotic corals work together with their plankton partners. (2008-09-12)
Low energy Iris not expected to make much of an impact
Low energy Iris which originated on March 24, 2018 is likely to hover around a low end Category 1 cyclone. (2018-03-26)
California Academy of Sciences discovers new species of dazzling, neon-colored fish
Named for Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love and beauty, a new species of dazzling, neon-colored fish from the twilight zone enchants Academy scientists. (2018-09-25)
Scientists pinpoint how ocean acidification weakens coral skeletons
The rising acidity of the oceans threatens coral reefs by making it harder for corals to build their skeletons. (2018-01-29)
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Iris weakening off Queensland coast
NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Coral Sea and captured an image of Tropical Cyclone Iris as it continued weakening and moving away from the coast of Queensland, Australia. (2018-04-05)
Early avian evolution: The Archaeopteryx that wasn't
Paleontologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich correct a case of misinterpretation: The first fossil (2017-12-05)
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