Popular Coral Reefs News and Current Events

Popular Coral Reefs News and Current Events, Coral Reefs News Articles.
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Marine oil snow
Marine snow is the phenomena of flakes of falling organic material and biological debris cascading down a water column like snowflakes. But an oil spill like Deepwater Horizon will add oil and dispersants to the mix, making marine oil snow that is can be toxic to organisms in deep-sea ecosystems. (2019-06-11)

Sudden aging
Coralline red algae have existed for 130 million years, in other words since the Cretaceous Period, the time of the dinosaurs. At least this was the established view of palaeontologists all over the world until now. However, this classification will now have to be revised after fossils discovered by researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg in conjunction with researchers at La Trobe University in Melbourne prove that coralline red algae existed as far back as 430 million years ago. (2019-01-16)

Following the light
Considering that light is the driving force behind the growth and productivity of reef ecosystems, scientists are interested in understanding the relationship between primary productivity and varying light conditions. In a recent PLoS ONE paper, postdoctoral researcher Yvonne Sawall and her advisor, associate scientist Eric Hochberg (both at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences) present evidence that reefs optimize their photosynthetic capacities to prevailing environmental conditions, such as general availability of light, nutrients, and temperature. (2019-02-05)

Reef engineers
The next time you find yourself luxuriating in some exotic, Instagrammable vacation spot, thank a parrotfish. That white sand slithering between your toes? It consists mostly of their excrement. (2019-04-30)

Doubling down
Over the recent decade, total human impacts to the world's oceans have, on average, nearly doubled and could double again in the next decade without adequate action. That's according to a new study by researchers from the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) at UC Santa Barbara. (2019-08-13)

Rigs to reefs
Offshore oil platforms have an immense presence, physically, financially and environmentally. Some 6,000 rigs pump petroleum and natural gas worldwide. But as they extract hydrocarbons from deep beneath the sea, these structures undergo a transformation invisible from above the waves. The ocean claims the platforms' enormous substructures and converts them into vertical reefs, home to millions of individual plants and animals. (2019-01-31)

Good neighbors
In the animal kingdom, food access is among the biggest drivers of habitat preference. It influences, among other things, how animals interact, where they roam and the amount of energy they expend to maintain their access to food. But how do different members of ecologically similar species manage to live close to each other? (2019-01-22)

Nature-based solutions can prevent $50 billion in Gulf Coast flood damages
While coastal development and climate change are increasing the risk of flooding for communities along the US Gulf Coast, restoration of marshes and oyster reefs are among the most cost-effective solutions for reducing those risks, according to a new study. (2018-04-11)

Corals in Singapore likely to survive sea-level rise: NUS study
Marine scientists from the National University of Singapore found that coral species in Singapore's sedimented and turbid waters are unlikely to be impacted by accelerating sea-level rise (2019-07-01)

Over half a million corals destroyed by port of Miami dredging, study finds
A team of researchers including scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, published new findings that reveal significant damage to Miami's coral reefs from the 16-month dredging operation at the Port of Miami that began in 2013. The study found that sediment buried between half to 90% of nearby reefs, resulting in widespread coral death. (2019-05-30)

Coral reefs suffering in Philippines despite outlawing damaging fishing practices
Some of the fishing methods used in today's small-scale fisheries are causing more damage to coral reefs than ever, a new UBC study has found. (2018-03-16)

Fungi the cause of many outbreaks of disease but mostly ignored
Many people, scientists among them, are largely unaware of the roles fungi play in the world around us. Research on fungi and fungal diseases are seriously neglected as a result -- a situation with grave negative repercussions for human health, agriculture, and the environment -- according to a new report from the American Academy of Microbiology. (2008-07-01)

The astounding genome of the dinoflagellate
Dinoflagellates live free-floating in the ocean or symbiotically with corals, serving up -- or as -- lunch to a host of mollusks, tiny fish and coral species. But when conditions are wrong, dinoflagellates poison shellfish beds with red tides and abandon coral reefs to a slow, bleached death. Globally, this is happening more and more often. Seeking answers, a team of researchers sequenced the complete genome of a dinoflagellate species for the first time. (2015-11-05)

Climate change efforts should focus on ocean-based solutions
The first broad-scale assessment of ocean-based measures to reduce atmospheric CO2, counteract ocean warming and/or reduce ocean acidification and sea-level rise shows their high potential to mitigate climate change and its impacts. The study identifies ocean-based renewable energy as the most promising, and several local marine conservation and restoration options as 'no-regret measures', that should be scaled-up and implemented immediately, but concludes all other measures are still too uncertain to recommend without further research. (2018-10-04)

A dolphin diet
The health of dolphin populations worldwide depends on sustained access to robust food sources. (2017-08-02)

New species of marine spider emerges at low tide to remind scientists of Bob Marley
It was 02:00h on 11 January 2009 when the sea along the coastline of Australia's 'Sunshine State' of Queensland receded to such an extent that it exposed a population of water-adapted spiders. The observant researchers, who would later describe this population as a species new to science, were quick to associate their emergence with Bob Marley's song 'High Tide or Low Tide'. Their study is published in the open access journal Evolutionary Systematics. (2017-12-22)

Bad news for Nemo
The beloved anemone fish popularized by the movies 'Finding Nemo' and 'Finding Dory' don't have the genetic capacity to adapt to rapid changes in their environment, according to a new study. (2019-11-27)

The Caribbean is stressed out
Forty percent of the world's 2.5 billion people live in coastal cities and towns. A team including Smithsonian marine biologists just released 25 years of data about the health of Caribbean coasts from the Caribbean Coastal Marine Productivity Program (CARICOMP). (2017-12-28)

Seagrass biodiversity is both a goal and a means for restoration
Planting multiple seagrass species, rather than a single species, could be better for restoring damaged coastal ecosystems in Indonesia's Coral Triangle. (2017-11-08)

How the color-changing hogfish 'sees' with its skin
The hogfish can go from white to reddish in milliseconds as it adjusts to shifting conditions in the ocean. Scientists have long suspected that animals with quick-changing colors don't just rely on their eyes to tune their appearance to their surroundings -- they also sense light with their skin. But exactly how remains a mystery. A study reveals that hogfish skin senses light differently from eyes. (2018-03-12)

Changes in reef latitude
Researchers have hypothesized that nutrient levels rather than temperature are the main factor controlling the latitudinal bounds of coral reefs, but the issue remains controversial. New results from a South Florida reef survey strongly support this hypothesis, suggesting human activities are reducing the areas where corals can survive. (2006-02-22)

Fixing the role of nitrogen in coral bleaching
A unique investigation highlights how excess nitrogen can trigger coral bleaching in the absence of heat stress. (2017-06-05)

Herring larvae could benefit from an acidifying ocean
Excess CO2 in the atmosphere is making the oceans more acidic. Some studies show that's bad news for fish, including commercially important species. But a new study shows that herring might be able to tolerate this change. (2018-03-29)

Deeper understanding of species roles in ecosystems
A species' traits define the role it plays in the ecosystem in which it lives -- this is the conclusion of a study carried out by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden. New methods can make it easier to predict the ecological role that a species will play when it is introduced, by accident or design, into a new habitat. (2018-04-12)

New SDSU study examines role of sea urchins on California kelp
California sheephead and spiny lobsters may be helping control sea urchin populations in Southern California kelp forests, where sea otters -- a top urchin predator -- have long been missing, according to a new San Diego State University (SDSU) study published in the journal Ecology. The research provides new insight into the complex predator-prey relationships in kelp forests that can be seen in the absence of sea otters. (2019-03-14)

Scientists look to the Bahamas as a model for coral reef conservation
One of the greatest challenges facing marine ecologists today is finding innovative ways to reverse the rapid decline of coral reef ecosystems around the world. To address this crisis, an international team of researchers, in consultation with the government of the Bahamas, launched the Bahamas Biocomplexity Project -- an interdisciplinary approach to ecosystem management that project leaders say could serve as a model for coral reef conservation worldwide. (2006-02-20)

Extinction by asteroid a rarity
Results presented at 2008 Joint Annual Meeting argue in favor of a (2008-10-06)

NASA measured rainfall from Fehi's remnants in New Zealand
The remnants of Tropical Cyclone Fehi brought rain to New Zealand before it fizzled out. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's GPM core satellite provided a look at the rainfall from its vantage point in space. (2018-02-02)

Smithsonian coral biodiversity survey of Panama's Pearl Islands
A comprehensive survey of coral biodiversity in Panama's Las Perlas Archipelago, published in the journal Environmental Conservation by researchers from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and their colleagues, has resulted in clear conservation recommendations for a new coastal management plan. (2008-07-07)

VIMS study identifies tipping point for oyster restoration
Study shows that reefs built to reach a foot or more above the bottom develop into healthy, self-sustaining ecosystems, while those rebuilt at lower heights are quickly buried by sediment. (2017-11-13)

Hurricanes Irma and Maria temporarily altered choruses of land and sea animals
Audio recordings of Hurricanes Irma and Maria's passage over Puerto Rico document how the calls of coastal critters changed in response to the deadly storms. The hurricanes caused a major disruption in the acoustic activity of snapping shrimp, a reduction in insect and bird sounds, and potentially an intensification of fish choruses, according to new research presented at the Ocean Sciences Meeting Friday. (2018-02-15)

Six new sponge species and new symbiotic associations from the Indonesian coral triangle
The Indonesian coral reefs, located in the so-called coral triangle, are considered amongst the richest and most biodiverse places on Earth. Surprisingly, this impressive species diversity is still poorly known. The paper, authored by an international team led by Barbara Calcinai and published in the open access journal ZooKeys, reports the presence of 94 species of sponges, including six new to science and two new symbiotic sponge associations. (2017-09-18)

Surprising killer of southeastern salt marshes: Common sea snails
From South Carolina to Texas, salt marshes have experienced a massive die-off in recent years, threatening fisheries and leaving coastal areas vulnerable to flooding. The culprit, ecologists have long thought, is degraded soil. But new research, published in Science, points to the periwinkle - cordgrass consuming sea snails - as a major contributor to salt marsh loss. (2005-12-15)

A brave new world for coral reefs
It is not too late to save coral reefs, but we must act now. (2017-05-31)

Scientists pinpoint how ocean acidification weakens coral skeletons
The rising acidity of the oceans threatens coral reefs by making it harder for corals to build their skeletons. A new study identifies the details of how ocean acidification affects coral skeletons, allowing scientists to predict more precisely where corals will be more vulnerable. (2018-01-29)

Low energy Iris not expected to make much of an impact
Low energy Iris which originated on March 24, 2018 is likely to hover around a low end Category 1 cyclone. Iris will track south through the Coral Sea. (2018-03-26)

California Academy of Sciences discovers new species of dazzling, neon-colored fish
Named for Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love and beauty, a new species of dazzling, neon-colored fish from the twilight zone enchants Academy scientists. It's only known home is the remote Brazilian archipelago of St. Paul's Rocks. (2018-09-25)

How corals adapt to day and night
Researchers have uncovered a gene in corals that responds to day/night cycles, which provides some tantalizing clues into how symbiotic corals work together with their plankton partners. (2008-09-12)

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Iris weakening off Queensland coast
NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Coral Sea and captured an image of Tropical Cyclone Iris as it continued weakening and moving away from the coast of Queensland, Australia. The Australian Bureau of Meteorology dropped all warnings for land areas, but maintained a High Seas Weather Warning for Metarea 10. (2018-04-05)

Early avian evolution: The Archaeopteryx that wasn't
Paleontologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich correct a case of misinterpretation: The first fossil (2017-12-05)

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