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Popular Cotton News and Current Events, Cotton News Articles.
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NUS researchers turn fashion waste into multifunctional material
A research team led by Associate Professor Hai Minh Duong and Professor Nhan Phan-Thien from the Department of Mechanical Engineering at National University of Singapore's Faculty of Engineering has devised a fast, cheap and green method to convert fashion waste into highly compressible and ultralight cotton aerogels. (2018-02-12)
Study links cottonseed oil with lower cholesterol
Researchers at the University of Georgia have found that a high-fat diet enriched with cottonseed oil drastically improved cholesterol profiles in young adult men. (2018-10-31)
Circadian clock discovery could help boost water efficiency in food plants
A discovery by Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists in Dallas provides new insights about the biological or circadian clock, how it regulates high water-use efficiency in some plants, and how others, including food plants, might be improved for the same efficiency. (2017-11-07)
Encouraging signs for potential new antibiotic
A study published online today (Feb. 17, 2017) in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, reveals strong evidence that the first in a new class of antibiotic is as effective as an established antimicrobial agent in the fight against infections caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria. (2017-02-16)
Tiny fibers create unseen plastic pollution
While the polyester leisure suit was a 1970s mistake, polyester and other synthetic fibers like nylon are still around and are a major contributor to the microplastics load in the environment, according to a Penn State materials scientist, who suggests switching to biosynthetic fibers to solve this problem. (2019-02-16)
Forensic botany uses plant DNA to trace crimes
Sam Houston State University is advancing the field of forensic botany with the publication of two recent studies that use marijuana DNA to link drug supplies and pollen DNA to aid in forensic investigations. (2016-02-29)
'Naturally' glowing cotton yields dazzling new threads
Cotton that's grown with molecules that endow appealing properties -- like fluorescence or magnetism -- may one day eliminate the need for applying chemical treatments to fabrics to achieve such qualities, a new study suggests. (2017-09-14)
A new machine learning model can classify lung cancer slides at the pathologist level
Dartmouth researchers have developed a deep neural network to classify lung cancer subtypes on histopathology slides and found that it performed on par with three practicing pathologists. (2019-03-04)
ASU researcher improves crop performance with new biotechnology
Researchers with Arizona State University's School of Life Sciences have discovered a way to enhance a plant's tolerance to stress, which in turn improves how it uses water and nutrients from the soil. (2016-03-24)
Supporting pollinators could have big payoff for Texas cotton farmers
According to a new study, increasing the diversity of pollinator species can dramatically increase cotton production. (2016-06-10)
People aren't the only beneficiaries of power plant carbon standards
A research team from Drexel University, Syracuse University, Boston University and Harvard University has projected the potential affects of carbon emissions standards in the year 2020. (2017-01-04)
A better sustainable sanitary pad
Students led by University of Utah materials science and engineering assistant professor (lecturer) Jeff Bates have developed a new, 100-percent biodegradable feminine maxi pad that is made of all natural materials and is much thinner and more comfortable than other similar products. (2017-05-15)
Cotton candy capillaries lead to circuit boards that dissolve when cooled
The silver nanowires are held together in the polymer so that they touch, and as long as the polymer doesn't dissolve, the nanowires will form a path to conduct electricity similar to the traces on a circuit board. (2017-06-27)
Adolescents are more likely than adults to use fruit- and candy-flavored e-cigarettes
As the FDA looks for more information on e-cigarettes and e-juice flavors, a new Dartmouth study shows that adolescents and young adults cite appealing flavors as a main reason for using e-cigarettes, that they are more likely to turn to fruit- and candy-flavored cigarettes than adult smokers trying to quit who more commonly prefer tobacco flavors, and that the younger population are likely to use multiple e-cigarette flavors at the same time. (2019-03-12)
Biocontrol of invasive water hyacinth contributes to socioeconomic and health improvements in Africa
In research that will be presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Plant Biologists in Chicago (July 7-11, 2007), scientists implemented a successful bioeradication program of an invasive water weed in Africa's Lake Victoria. (2007-07-08)
Tennessee scientist works to increase crops' water saving potential
Studies at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture are identifying plant physiological traits that could minimize the effect of drought in row crops. (2018-04-18)
A new machine learning approach detects esophageal cancer better than current methods
Dartmouth scientists have proposed a new machine learning model for identification of esophageal cancer that could open new avenues for applying deep learning to digital pathology. (2019-11-06)
Secret weapon of smart bacteria tracked to 'sweet tooth'
Researchers have figured out how a once-defeated bacterium has re-emerged to infect cotton in a battle that could sour much of the Texas and US crop. (2017-05-24)
Genetic search reveals key to resistance in global cotton pest
Researchers have pinpointed a dominant genetic mutation that makes cotton bollworms, one of the world's most destructive crop pests, resistant to genetically engineered cotton. (2018-10-29)
Chinese scientists unravel weapons of defense against 'cotton cancer'
A group of Chinese scientists led by Professor Guo Huishan from Institute of Microbiology of Chinese Academy of Sciences discovered that trans-kingdom small RNAs can be used to protect crops from infection of fungal pathogens. (2016-10-08)
New machine learning method could spare some women from unnecessary breast surgery
Dartmouth researchers have developed and evaluated a machine learning approach of using patient core needle biopsy data to identify the risk that atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) breast lesions may upgrade to cancer. (2019-02-12)
Interferon-treated hepatitis C patients likely to experience retinopathy
Persons with chronic hepatitis C being treated with Interferon (IFN) are at risk of developing retinopathy as early as two weeks into treatment according to the results of a new study published in the January 2007 issue of Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science. (2007-01-03)
Comparing cancer drug effectiveness from cells to mice to man
Dartmouth researchers who studied the cancer drug gemcitabine in cell culture, mouse models and humans have shown that the drug, at administered (tolerated) dose, arrests cell growth during cancer progression. (2017-09-06)
Latest knowledge on plant cell-wall biology in new book
The wall to a plant cell is no longer just a biological bulwark. (2003-12-04)
Scientists crack genetic code determining leaf shape in cotton
Researchers know that the variation in leaf shapes can mean big differences in a farmer's bottom line. (2016-12-21)
Chronic administration of nandrolone decanoate
Investigations by researchers of Zoology Department of Cotton College, Guwahati, and Gauhati University, Guwahati, Assam, India, have revealed that long term exposure to elevated doses of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AAS) can significantly affect aldosterone concentration and serum sodium/ potassium levels in albino mice. (2017-03-02)
Bodyguards in the gut have a chemical weapon
Beneficial bacteria in the gut of moth larvae produce an antibiotic that kills competing bacteria which otherwise have detrimental effects on insect development. (2017-01-19)
Implementing no-till and cover crops in Texas cotton systems
Healthy soil leads to productive and sustainable agriculture. Farmers who work with, not against, the soil can improve the resiliency of their land. (2019-11-18)
Electrically-heated textiles now possible via UMass Amherst research
Skiers, crossing guards and others who endure frozen fingers in cold weather may look forward to future relief as manufacturers are poised to take advantage of a new technique for creating electrically heated cloth developed by materials scientist Trisha Andrew and colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. (2017-09-28)
Cotton-based hybrid biofuel cell could power implantable medical devices
A glucose-powered biofuel cell that uses electrodes made from cotton fiber could someday help power implantable medical devices such as pacemakers and sensors. (2018-11-15)
Guidelines needed for use of therapy animals in mental health treatment
Therapy animals are used in the treatment of both mental and physical health issues, however this important form of therapy is not regulated, which leaves it open to misuse and misunderstanding by those who deliver it and the wider community. (2018-03-07)
Some color shades offer better protection against sun's ultraviolet rays
Economy-minded consumers who want protection from the sun's harmful ultraviolet rays -- but rather not pay premium prices for sun-protective clothing -- should think blue and red, rather than yellow. (2009-10-14)
Next-generation sequencing used to identify cotton blue disease in the United States
Cotton blue disease, caused by Cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV), was first reported in 1949 in the Central African Republic and then not again until 2005, when it was reported from Brazil. (2019-10-17)
Farming's genetic revolution has yet to materialise
New figures reveal that genetically engineered crops may not be bringing about the revolution in agricuture expected. (1999-07-07)
Genetic matchmaking saves endangered frogs
As researchers from the Smithsonian's Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project race to save frogs from a devastating disease by breeding them in captivity, a genetic test averts mating mix-ups. (2013-01-08)
Researchers confirm glyphosate resistance in junglerice
There has been a lot of publicity in recent years about growers battling glyphosate-resistant pigweed in soybean and cotton crops. (2018-09-18)
Washing clothes releases thousands of microplastic particles into environment, study shows
More than 700,000 microscopic fibers could be released into waste water during an average washing machine cycle, according to new research from Plymouth University. (2016-10-03)
Prescribed burning not as damaging as previously thought
New research by the University of Liverpool has found that prescribed burning, a controversial technique where fires are intentionally used to manage vegetation, is not as damaging to peat growth as previously thought if carried out on a sensible rotation, and can produce several positive outcomes. (2018-12-03)
Glyphosate in tampons? No indication of residues of any health significance
Just like other feminine hygiene products, tampons consist mainly of cotton. (2019-06-04)
Novel scale correlates children's snacking behaviors with external food cues
Preliminary evidence from a new national Dartmouth study suggests that external food cue responsiveness is measurable by parental report in preschool-age children. (2019-05-14)
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