Popular Crocodiles News and Current Events

Popular Crocodiles News and Current Events, Crocodiles News Articles.
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Holy crocodiles
Sebastian Brackhane of the University of Freiburg has researched the cultural status of the reptiles in East Timor. (2019-07-02)

Prehistoric AC
Tyrannosaurus rex, one of the largest meat-eating dinosaurs on the planet, had an air conditioner in its head, suggest scientists from the University of Missouri, Ohio University and University of Florida, while challenging over a century of previous beliefs. (2019-09-04)

Crocodile face off
Despite often being portrayed as creatures that have remained virtually unchanged for millions of years, a new Harvard study shows crocodiles have repeatedly altered their developmental patterns, leading to much of the diversity found in modern, living crocodiles. (2019-02-20)

Evolution: The beneficiaries of mass extinction
Mass extinctions were followed by periods of low diversity in which certain new species dominated wide regions of the supercontinent Pangaea, reports a new study. (2017-10-10)

Jurassic crocodile discovery sheds light on reptiles' family tree
A 150 million-year-old fossil has been identified as a previously unseen species of ancient crocodile that developed a tail fin and paddle-like limbs for life in the sea. (2019-04-04)

Fossil discovery rewrites understanding of reproductive evolution
A remarkable 250-million-year-old 'terrible-headed lizard' fossil found in China shows an embryo inside the mother -- clear evidence for live birth. Head of The University of Queensland's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences and co-author Professor Jonathan Aitchison said the fossil unexpectedly provided the first evidence for live birth in an animal group previously thought to exclusively lay eggs. (2017-02-14)

Giant extinct burrowing bat discovered in New Zealand
The fossilized remains of a giant burrowing bat that lived in New Zealand millions of years ago have been found by a UNSW Sydney-led international team of scientists. Teeth and bones of the extinct bat -- which was about three times the size of an average bat today -- were recovered from 19 to 16-million-year-old sediments near the town of St Bathans in Central Otago on the South Island. (2018-01-10)

It's all in the ears: Inner ears of extinct sea monsters mirror those of today's animals
A new study led by Oxford University Museum of Natural History has revealed that an extinct group of marine reptiles called sauropterygians evolved similar inner ear proportions to those of some modern day aquatic reptiles and mammals. The research is published in Current Biology today. (2017-12-07)

Print a 200-million-year-old dinosaur fossil in your own home
The digital reconstruction of the skull of a 200-million-year-old South African dinosaur, Massospondylus, has made it possible for researchers to make 3-D prints and in this way facilitate research on other dinosaurs all over the world. (2018-01-12)

Gut microbes and bird's breath from the U at #SICB2017
University of Utah researchers will be among the scientists convening in New Orleans for the 2017 Annual Meeting for the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology Jan. 4-8 (#SICB2017). Attendees gather at the research and educational forum to share recent findings and navigate the future challenges in their respective fields. (2017-01-06)

Iguana-sized dinosaur cousin discovered in Antarctica
Scientists have discovered the fossils of an iguana-sized reptile, which they named 'Antarctic king,' that lived at the South Pole 250 million years ago (it used to be warmer). Antarctanax was an early cousin of the dinosaurs, and it shows how life bounced back after the world's biggest mass extinction. (2019-01-31)

Study: Infamous 'death roll' almost universal among crocodile species
The iconic 'death roll' of alligators and crocodiles may be more common among species than previously believed, according to a new study published in Ethology, Ecology & Evolution and coauthored by a researcher at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (2019-04-18)

Mysterious Jurassic crocodile identified 250 years after fossil find
A prehistoric crocodile that lived around 180 million years ago has been identified -- almost 250 years after the discovery of it fossil remains. (2019-09-12)

Jurassic fossil tail tells of missing link in crocodile family tree
A 180 million-year-old fossil has shed light on how some ancient crocodiles evolved into dolphin-like animals. (2018-05-11)

Gigantic mammal 'cousin' discovered
During the Triassic period (252-201 million years ago) mammal-like reptiles called therapsids co-existed with ancestors to dinosaurs, crocodiles, mammals, pterosaurs, turtles, frogs, and lizards. One group of therapsids are the dicynodonts. Researchers at Uppsala University in Sweden, together with colleagues in Poland, have discovered fossils from a new genus of gigantic dicynodont. The new species Lisowicia bojani is described in the journal Science. (2018-11-22)

The dinosaur menu, as revealed by calcium
By studying calcium in fossil remains in deposits in Morocco and Niger, researchers have been able to reconstruct the food chains of the past, thus explaining how so many predators could coexist in the dinosaurs' time. This study was conducted by researchers from the CNRS, ENS de Lyon and Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University, in partnership with the French National Museum of Natural History and Sorbonne University. (2018-04-11)

New wasps named after Crocodile Dundee and Toblerone amongst 17 new genera and 29 species
A total of 17 new genera and 29 new species of parasitoid wasps are described from across all tropical regions of the world. Amongst the novel taxa, there are three genera named after the action comedy 'Crocodile Dundee', the chocolate brand 'Toblerone', and the Madagascar spiny forests. In addition, five species are named after institutions holding some of the largest wasp collections. The findings are published in the open access Journal of Hymenoptera Research. (2018-06-25)

Bite on this: Kansas State University researcher finds alligators eat sharks
Jaws, beware! Alligators may be coming for you, according to a Kansas State University researcher. A study in Southeastern Naturalist documents American alligators on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts are eating small sharks and stingrays. This is the first scientific documentation of a widespread interaction between the two predators. (2017-10-16)

Evolution: It's all in the ears
A new study by a team of international experts, led by Dr James Neenan, a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Evolutionary Studies Institute at Wits University in South Africa, has revealed that a completely extinct group of marine reptiles called sauropterygians evolved similar inner ear proportions to those of some modern day aquatic reptiles and mammals. (2017-12-07)

Dinosaurs ended -- and originated -- with a bang!
It is commonly understood that the dinosaurs disappeared with a bang -- wiped out by a great meteorite impact on the Earth 66 million years ago. But their origins have been less understood. In a new study, scientists from MUSE -- Museum of Science, Trento, Italy, universities of Ferrara and Padova, Italy and the University of Bristol show that the key expansion of dinosaurs was also triggered by a crisis -- a mass extinction that happened 232 million years ago. (2018-04-16)

T. Rex couldn't stick out its tongue, new research shows
Dinosaurs are often depicted as fierce creatures, baring their teeth, with tongues wildly stretching from their mouths like giant, deranged lizards. But new research reveals a major problem with this classic image: Dinosaurs couldn't stick out their tongues like lizards. Instead, their tongues were probably rooted to the bottoms of their mouths in a manner akin to alligators. (2018-06-20)

Crocodiles listen to classical music in MRI scanner
What happens in a crocodile's brain when it hears complex sounds? An international research team headed by Dr. Felix Ströckens from the Department of Biopsychology at Ruhr-Universität Bochum has provided the answer to this question. In a first, the researchers examined a cold-blooded reptile using functional MRI. They were thus able to determine that complex stimuli triggered activation patterns in the crocodile's brain that are similar to those in birds and mammals (2018-05-03)

Some crocs of the past were plant eaters
Based on careful study of tooth remains, researchers have found that ancient groups of crocodyliforms -- the group including living and extinct relatives of crocodiles and alligators -- were not the carnivores we know today, as reported in the journal Current Biology on June 27, 2019. In fact, the evidence suggests that a veggie diet arose in the distant cousins of modern crocodylians at least three times. (2019-06-27)

What did ancient crocodiles eat? Study says as much as a snout can grab
To study the diet of ancient crocodiles, two researchers--one from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and one from Stony Brook University--combined mathematical analyses of the animals' shapes, surveys of modern crocodiles' diet, modeling methods for reconstructing the diet of fossil groups, and forensic-style interpretations of damaged bones from the distant past. (2019-09-30)

Birds' unique skulls linked to young dinosaur brains
Bird skulls and brains look like those of young dinosaurs, providing clues to their unique evolution and modern success. (2017-09-11)

Dinosaurs used nasal passages to keep brains cool
Dinosaur nasal passages were certainly nothing to sneeze at. Possessing among the largest and most complex nasal passages seen in animals, their function has puzzled paleontologists. New research suggests that the size and shape of these nasal passages would have allowed incoming air to cool the blood making its way to the brain, maintaining the brain at an optimum temperature. The study was presented at the 75th Annual Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology in Dallas, Texas (2015-10-28)

Crocodiles and dolphins evolved similar skulls to catch the same prey: Study finds
A new study involving biologists from Monash University Australia has found that despite their very different ancestors, dolphins and crocodiles evolved similarly shaped skulls to feed on similar prey. (2017-03-07)

Humans may have colonized Madagascar later than previously thought
New archaeological evidence from southwest Madagascar reveals that modern humans colonized the island thousands of years later than previously thought, according to a study published Oct. 10, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Atholl Anderson from the Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, and colleagues. (2018-10-10)

In the gaping mouth of ancient crocodiles
A new study by a team of international experts, led by University of Witwatersrand PhD candidate Kathleen Dollman and Professor Jonah Choiniere published today in the American Museum Novitates, endeavoured to further explore the mouth of one of the earliest occurring and least understood groups of crocodilians, the shartegosuchids. (2018-06-18)

A small plesiosaur lived in Spain 125 million years ago
Plesiosaurs, erroneously viewed as dinosaurs, inhabited all the seas between 200 million and 65 million years ago. In the Peninsula, only scarce remains of these long-necked reptiles had been found. Now a group of palaeontologists has found the most abundant collection of fossils in Morella, Castellón. Among them, there is one vertebra that belonged to a type of plesiosaur never before discovered in the country, the leptocleidus. (2019-03-04)

Anatomist is fleshing out dinosaur heads, reaching people about science
Accurately depicting dinosaur anatomy has come a long way since the science fiction films of the 1960s. In celebration of the American Association of Anatomists' 125th anniversary, renowned dinosaur anatomy expert Dr. Lawrence Witmer will deliver a lecture reflecting on the AAA's first President Joseph Leidy, also a preeminent American dinosaur paleontologist, and the modernizing of prehistoric bones. (2013-04-22)

Skull reconstruction sheds new light on tetrapod transition from water to land
Three-hundred-and-sixty-million-year-old tetrapods may have been more like modern crocodiles than previously thought, according to 3-D skull reconstruction. (2015-03-11)

A pheromone-sensing gene that predates land-dwelling vertebrates
Scientists at Tokyo Tech have discovered a gene that appears to play a vital role in pheromone sensing. The gene is conserved across fish and mammals and over 400 million years of vertebrate evolution, indicating that the pheromone sensing system is much more ancient than previously believed. This discovery opens new avenues of research into the origin, evolution, and function of pheromone signaling. (2018-10-09)

Luck gave dinosaurs their edge
By comparing early dinosaurs to their closest competitors, the curuotarsans, Steve Brusatte of the American Museum of Natural History and colleagues have found that dinosaurs had no special ability to dominate the landscape for 160 million years. Curuotarsans looked better during the Triassic, having twice the disparity (or variation in body plans) and evolving at similar rates until rapid global warming spurred extinction of most groups (except crocodiles) while nearly all dinosaur groups survived. (2008-09-11)

Wildebeest feast: Mass drownings fuel the Mara River ecosystem
Each year, more than a million wildebeest migrate through Africa's Serengeti Mara Ecosystem. While crossing the Kenyan reach of the Mara River, thousands perish. A new study, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is the first to reveal how wildebeest drownings impact the ecology of the iconic river. (2017-06-19)

Mammals' unique arms started evolving before the dinosaurs existed
One of the things that makes mammals special is our diverse forelimbs -- bat wings, whale flippers, gibbon arms, and cheetah legs have evolved to do different, specialized tasks. Scientists wanted to see where this mammalian trait started evolving, so they examined fossils from early mammal relatives to see when the upper arm bones started diversifying. They discovered that the trait took root 270 million years ago -- 30 million years before the earliest dinosaurs existed. (2019-03-18)

Crocodiles have complex past
A new study offers a different version to the evolutionary past of modern-day crocodiles and alligators. The study, published Thursday in the journal Scientific Reports, says crocodiles and alligators came from a variety of surroundings beginning in the early Jurassic Period, and various species occupied a host of ecosystems over time, including land, estuarine, freshwater and marine. (2019-01-24)

Monstrous crocodile fossil points to early rise of ancient reptiles
A newly identified prehistoric marine predator has shed light on the origins of the distant relatives of modern crocodiles. (2017-10-02)

Baby pterodactyls could fly from birth
A breakthrough discovery has found that pterodactyls, extinct flying reptiles also known as pterosaurs, had a remarkable ability -- they could fly from birth. No other living vertebrates today, or in the history of life as we know it, have been able to replicate this. This revelation has a profound impact on our understanding of how pterodactyls lived, which is critical to understanding how the dinosaur world worked as a whole. (2019-06-12)

Male or female? Scientist challenges evidence of sex differences among dinosaurs
A paleontologist at the Canadian Museum of Nature is countering decades of studies that assert that some dinosaurs can be identified as male or female based on the shapes and sizes of their bones. The study by Dr. Jordan Mallon appears in the online edition of Paleobiology. (2017-03-29)

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