Popular Curiosity News and Current Events

Popular Curiosity News and Current Events, Curiosity News Articles.
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Searching beyond graphene for new wonder materials
Graphene, the two-dimensional, ultra lightweight and super-strong carbon film, has been hailed as a wonder material since its discovery in 2004. Now researchers are going beyond graphene and preparing other 2-D films with extraordinary properties for applications in wearable electronics, sensors and energy storage. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, surveys this expanding landscape. (2017-05-31)

An oil-eating bacterium that can help clean up pollution and spills
Oil spills occur on a regular basis, leading to messy decontamination challenges. But however widespread and serious the damage may be, the solution could be microscopic -- Alcanivorax borkumensis -- a bacterium that feeds on hydrocarbons. A research team at INRS show the effectiveness of enzymes produced by the bacterium in degrading petroleum products in soil and water. Their results offer hope for a simple, effective, and eco-friendly method of decontaminating water and soil at oil sites. (2018-04-09)

A simple cell holds 42 million protein molecules, scientists reveal
Toronto scientists have finally put their finger on how many protein molecules there are in a cell, ending decades of guesswork and clearing the way for further research on how protein abundance affects health of an organism. (2018-01-10)

Mars exhumes methane on a seasonal cycle, Curiosity reveals; rover also detects ancient organic matter
Data from the Curiosity rover, part of two separate studies, furthers scientists' understanding of methane on Mars -- suggesting some of it may be trapped in water-based crystals -- and identifies additional carbon-bearing molecules, central to understanding processes and conditions on the planet. (2018-06-07)

Researchers discover that female cats are more likely to be right-handed
Researchers at Queen's University Belfast have found that female cats are much more likely to use their right paw than males. (2018-01-22)

A bewildering form of dune on Mars
Researchers have discovered a type of dune on Mars intermediate in size between tiny ripples and wavier dunes, and unlike anything seen on Earth. (2016-06-30)

Scientist's work may provide answer to martian mountain mystery
By seeing which way the wind blows, a University of Texas at Dallas fluid dynamics expert has helped propose a solution to a Martian mountain mystery. Dr. William Anderson, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering, co-authored a paper published in the journal Physical Review E that explains the common Martian phenomenon of a mountain positioned downwind from the center of an ancient meteorite impact zone. (2018-01-11)

Curiosity has the power to change behavior for the better
Curiosity could be an effective tool to entice people into making smarter and sometimes healthier decisions, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association. (2016-08-04)

Clear as mud: Desiccation cracks help reveal the shape of water on Mars
As Curiosity rover marches across Mars, the red planet's watery past comes into clearer focus. (2018-04-19)

Study explores link between curiosity and school achievement
The more curious the child, the more likely he or she may be to perform better in school -- regardless of economic background -- suggests a new University of Michigan study. (2018-04-30)

Mars might have liquid water
Researchers have long known that there is water in the form of ice on Mars. Now, new research shows that it is possible that there is liquid water close to the surface of Mars. The explanation is that the substance perchlorate has been found in the soil, which lowers the freezing point so the water does not freeze into ice, but is liquid and present in very salty water -- a brine. (2015-04-13)

What causes the sound of a dripping tap -- and how do you stop it?
Scientists have solved the riddle behind one of the most recognisable, and annoying, household sounds: the dripping tap. And crucially, they have also identified a simple solution to stop it, which most of us already have in our kitchens. (2018-06-22)

Plants cheat too: A new species of fungus-parasitizing orchid
Plants usually produce their own nutrients by using sun energy, but not all of them. A new 'cheater' species of orchid from Japan, lives off nutrients obtained via a special kind of symbiosis with fungi. The study was published in the open access journal PhytoKeys. (2016-11-03)

New design strategy can help improve layered superconducting materials
Tokyo, Japan - Scientists from Tokyo Metropolitan University have created a new layered superconducting material with a conducting layer made of bismuth, silver, tin, sulfur and selenium. The conducting layer features four distinct sublayers; by introducing more elements, they were able to achieve unparalleled customizability and a higher ''critical temperature'' below which superconductivity is observed, a key objective of superconductor research. Their design strategy may be applied to engineer new and improved superconducting materials. (2019-10-12)

Studying heat transfer with computers is easier now
New research will enable heat transfer to be studied more accurately and efficiently using powerful super computers, thereby opening up interesting application and research perspectives. (2017-11-27)

Soft tissue fossil clues could help search for ancient life on Earth and other planets
Fossils that preserve entire organisms (including both hard and soft body parts) are critical to our understanding of evolution and ancient life on Earth. However, these exceptional deposits are extremely rare. New Oxford University research suggests that the mineralogy of the surrounding earth is key to conserving soft parts of organisms, and finding more exceptional fossils. Part-funded by NASA, the work could potentially support the Mars Rover Curiosity in its sample analysis, and speed up the search for traces of life on other planets. (2018-02-15)

Scientists find 'new' science instrument on Mars rover Curiosity
NASA's Curiosity Rover may have been ambling around the Gale Crater on Mars for nearly seven years but scientists have found a way to use it for something new: making the first surface gravity measurements on a planet other than Earth. (2019-01-31)

Curiosity can predict employees' ability to creatively solve problems, research shows
Employers who are looking to hire creative problem-solvers should consider candidates with strong curiosity traits, and personality tests may be one way to tease out those traits in prospective employees, new research from Oregon State University shows. (2016-11-17)

Antidote for partisanship? In science, curiosity seems to work
Disputes over science-related policy issues such as climate change or fracking often seem as intractable as other politically charged debates. But in science, at least, simple curiosity might help bridge that partisan divide, according to new research. (2017-01-26)

When not to eat your kids
Even though it is known to be a cannibal, the mangrove rivulus or killifish of the Americas will never eat one of its own embryos, even if it is hungry. This slender amphibious fish can recognize its own kin, even if these are still in the embryonic stage. This is according to a study by Michael Wells and Patricia Wright of the University of Guelph in Canada, in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. (2017-09-05)

Curiosity is key to early childhood success in math and reading
Curious children are better able to grasp basic math and reading. This is according to a group of researchers from the University of Michigan, led by Prachi Shah. The study in the journal Pediatric Research, which is published by Springer Nature, is the first to investigate a possible link between curiosity and early academic success among young children. (2018-04-26)

Curiosity's first attempt at gravimetry advances martian geology
By cleverly repurposing a device onboard Curiosity normally used to detect the rover's movements on Mars to measure slight variations in gravitational fields instead, researchers have refined the understanding of how Gale crater and the mountain at its center formed. (2019-01-31)

One in 5 adults secretly access their friends' Facebook accounts
Most people are concerned about the prospect of their social media accounts being hacked, but a new University of British Columbia study finds that it's actually people we know who frequently access our accounts without our permission. (2017-01-19)

Children's screen-time guidelines too restrictive, according to new research
Digital screen use is a staple of contemporary life for adults and children, whether they are browsing on laptops and smartphones, or watching TV. Pediatricians and scientists have long expressed concerns about the impact of overusing technology on people's wellbeing. However, new Oxford University research suggests that existing guidance managing children's digital media time may not be as beneficial as first thought. (2017-12-14)

Discovery of boron on Mars adds to evidence for habitability
The discovery of boron on Mars gives scientists more clues about whether life could have ever existed on the planet, according to a paper published today in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. (2017-09-05)

New research uses Curiosity rover to measure gravity on Mars
A team of researchers repurposed navigational sensors aboard NASA's Curiosity rover, enabling the scientists to measure gravity on the lower slopes of Mount Sharp, a peak that rises from the center of Gale Crater. The results suggest that these rock layers are much less dense than predicted, calling into question a competing theory that Gale Crater was once completely filled with sediment then later excavated by erosion, leaving only Mount Sharp behind. (2019-01-31)

Rare sharks are no longer in the 'dark,' thanks to new species survey method
Previously unobserved shark species swim in areas impacted by humans, reports a new study. The results reveal a greater prevalence of sharks in such regions than traditional survey methods have uncovered, and the approach for uncovering them may lead to more thorough species diversity assessments in areas with rare and threatened large animals - often hard to (2018-05-02)

Living room conservation: Gaming & virtual reality for insect and ecosystem conservation
Gaming and virtual reality could bridge the gap between urban societies and nature, thereby paving the way to insect conservation by the means of education and participation. This is what an interdisciplinary team at Florida International University strive to achieve by developing a virtual reality game (desktop version also available) dedicated to insect and plant species. Focused on imperiled butterflies, their innovative idea: Butterfly World 1.0, is described in the open-access journal Rethinking Ecology. (2019-04-18)

Tracking a solar eruption through the solar system
Ten spacecraft, from ESA's Venus Express to NASA's Voyager-2, felt the effect of a solar eruption as it washed through the solar system while three other satellites watched, providing a unique perspective on this space weather event. (2017-08-15)

Research suggests fumigants have very low long-term impact on soil health
It started with curiosity. How does a fumigant, commonly used for nematode management in potato cropping systems, influence soil microbial communities? To explore this question, scientists at Colorado State University and Oregon State University used high-throughput sequencing techniques to investigate changes in soil bacterial and fungal community structure in response to the application of 1,3-Dichloropropene (1,3-D) in Pacific Northwest potato production fields. Their research found that the fumigant had very minor effects. (2019-11-07)

Only half of US children get enough sleep during the week
Only 48% of school age children in the United States get 9 hours of sleep most weeknights, according to new research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2019 National Conference & Exhibition in New Orleans. Those who do, the study suggests, are significantly more likely to show a positive outlook toward school and other signs of 'childhood flourishing,' a measure of behavioral and social well-being. (2019-10-25)

Want new medicines? You need fundamental research
Ideological debate over support for science sometimes pits 'curiosity-driven' against 'utilitarian' research. Drug-discovery scientists at Harvard and Novartis reviewed the evidence and historical records. Large body of evidence shows that fundamental science lays the essential foundation for developing the best medicines in the future. (2018-04-25)

Human Evolution: Our Brains and Behavior by Robin Dunbar
In HUMAN EVOLUTION, Robin Dunbar takes readers from prehistoric to modern times, focusing on an aspect of evolution that has typically been overshadowed by the archaeological record: the biological, neurological, and genetic changes that occurred with each 'transition' in the evolutionary narrative. (2016-11-07)

UCF selling experimental Martian dirt -- $20 a kilogram, plus shipping
The University of Central Florida is selling Martian dirt, $20 a kilogram plus shipping. A team of UCF astrophysicists has developed a scientifically based, standardized method for creating Martian and asteroid soil known as simulants. The team published its findings this month in the journal Icarus. (2018-09-28)

Texas A&M researcher makes breakthrough discovery in stretchable electronics materials
With a wide range of healthcare, energy and military applications, stretchable electronics are revered for their ability to be compressed, twisted and conformed to uneven surfaces without losing functionality. (2019-05-29)

How cicadas manage to 'wing it' 
Unlike locusts and many other flying insects, cicadas don't soar through the air with the greatest of ease. Now in a study appearing the ACS' The Journal of Physical Chemistry B, scientists report that certain chemical components in the insect's wings could explain why. (2017-08-09)

The first rains in centuries in the Atacama Desert devastate its microbial life
The Atacama Desert, the driest and oldest desert on Earth, located in northern Chile, hides a hyper-arid core in which no rain has been recorded during the past 500 years. But this situation has changed in the last three years: for the first time, rainfall has been documented in the hyper-arid core of the Atacama and, contrary to what was expected, the water supply has caused a great devastation among local life. (2018-11-14)

Mars rover finds ancient organic compounds that match meteoritic samples
NASA's Curiosity Rover discovered 'tough' organic molecules on Mars, increasing the chances that a record of potential life could have been preserved despite harsh conditions that can easily break down organics. Carnegie's Andrew Steele was a key member of the research team, whose work on this project built off his discovery six years ago of indigenous organic carbon in Martian meteorites. The organic molecules he found in 2012 are comparable to those found by Curiosity. (2018-06-07)

Gulf stream eddies as a source of iron
ETH researchers have fortuitously discovered that Gulf Stream eddies are rich in iron, and these eddies transport this essential micronutrient to the iron-poor North Atlantic Gyre. Before this discovery, the typical assumption was that this part of the ocean received iron primarily from Saharan dust. (2018-07-03)

Martian dust storm grows global: Curiosity captures photos of thickening haze
A storm of tiny dust particles has engulfed much of Mars over the last two weeks and prompted NASA's Opportunity rover to suspend science operations. But across the planet, NASA's Curiosity rover, which has been studying Martian soil at Gale Crater, is expected to remain largely unaffected by the dust. The Martian dust storm has grown in size and is now officially a 'planet-encircling' (or 'global') dust event. (2018-06-20)

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