Popular Cyanide News and Current Events

Popular Cyanide News and Current Events, Cyanide News Articles.
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Gold recycling
'Urban mining', the recycling of precious metals from electronic gadgets, becomes ever more important, although processes that are both efficient and environmentally benign are still scarce. An international team of scientists has now looked deeper into gold dissolution, in particular, how organic thiol-containing compounds help dissolve elemental gold. Their study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie proposes selective, fast, and convenient thiol-assisted gold leaching processes. (2018-12-13)

Entomologist discovers millipede that comes in more color combinations than any other
The thumb-sized millipede that crawls around the forest floor of Southwest Virginia's Cumberland Mountains has more color combinations than any other millipede discovered. (2018-01-26)

Siberian scientists learned how to reduce harmful emissions from HPPs
A team of scientists from Siberian Federal University (SFU) and their colleagues from Novosibirsk and the Netherlands modeled the process of coal burning in HPP boilers and found out which type of fuel produced less harmful emissions. The study was published in Fuel journal. (2018-01-22)

Virginia Tech entomologist discovers invertebrate that comes in more color combinations than any oth
The thumb-sized millipede that crawls around the forest floor of Southwest Virginia's Cumberland Mountains has more color combinations than any other millipede discovered. (2017-12-04)

CU researchers provide resource for patient care in chemical and biological attacks
The neurologic effects and treatment options for exposure to biologic and chemical agents are outlined in a newly published article by neurologists from the University of Colorado School of Medicine who collaborated on the article with military physicians. (2018-10-26)

Highly efficient heavy metal ions filter
ETH researchers have developed a new water filtration system that is superior to existing systems in many respects: it is extremely efficient at removing various toxic heavy metal ions and radioactive substances from water and can even be used in gold recovery. (2016-01-25)

Forest of molecular signals in star forming galaxy
Astronomers found a rich molecular reservoir in the heart of an active star-forming galaxy with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Among eight clouds identified at the center of the galaxy NGC 253, one exhibits very complex chemical composition, while in the other clouds many signals are missing. This chemical richness and diversity shed light on the nature of the baby boom galaxy. (2017-11-06)

Mixed signals from poisonous moths
Poisonous moths use bright red spots to warn predators to avoid them -- but natural variation in these wing markings doesn't provide clear indications of how toxic individual moths might be -- new research shows. (2018-06-04)

A better way to make acrylics
Acrylics are an incredibly diverse and useful family of chemicals used in all kinds of products, from diapers to nail polish. Now, a team of researchers from UConn and ExxonMobil describe a new process for making them. The new method would increase energy efficiency and reduce toxic byproducts, they report in the Feb. 8 issue of Nature Communications. (2019-02-08)

UNIST researchers reveal how one bacterium inhibits predators with poison
A team of scientists, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has unveiled that the bacterium Chromobacterium piscinae produces cyanide, an inhibitory molecule, to defend themselves in the battle against Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100. (2018-02-21)

Trinity College Dublin researchers describe the first model of mitochondrial epilepsy
Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have become the first to describe a model of mitochondrial epilepsy which raises hope for better therapies for patients with this incapacitating condition.Despite the severity of this epilepsy, up to now there have been no animal models available to provide a mechanistic understanding of the condition. That is set to change though as researchers at Trinity can now explain the important role that astrocytes play in seizure generation. (2019-02-15)

Study solves puzzle of snail and slug feeding preferences
A study led by the University of Plymouth suggests the reason some seedlings are more commonly eaten by slugs and snails may be down to the smells produced by young seedlings in the early stages of their development. (2018-12-05)

Mass biofuel production without mass antibiotic use
Rather than applying mass amounts of antibiotics to vats of biofuel-producing microorganisms to keep control these cultures, researchers have developed a new technique using modified strains that outcompete other possible contaminating microbes. (2016-08-04)

New study looks to biological enzymes as source of hydrogen fuel
Research from the University of Illinois and the University of California, Davis has chemists one step closer to recreating nature's most efficient machinery for generating hydrogen gas. This new development may help clear the path for the hydrogen fuel industry to move into a larger role in the global push toward more environmentally friendly energy sources. (2019-11-25)

Jupiter-like planets could form around twin suns
Life on a planet ruled by two suns might be a little complicated. Two sunrises, two sunsets. Twice the radiation field. Joel Kastner and his team suggest that planets may easily form around certain types of twin star systems. A disk of molecules discovered orbiting a pair of twin young suns in the constellation Sagittarius strongly suggests that many such binary systems also host planets. (2009-01-05)

New study reveals structure of E. coli multidrug transporter protein
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have determined the x-ray structure of EmrD, a multidrug transporter protein from Escherichia coli (E. coli), a common bacteria known to cause several food-borne illnesses. Proteins like EmrD that expel drugs from cells contribute significantly to the continued rise in multidrug resistant bacteria, and the re-emergence of drug-resistant strains of diseases such as tuberculosis that were once thought to have been eradicated. (2006-05-04)

Unexpected atmospheric vortex behavior on Saturn's moon Titan
A new study led by a University of Bristol earth scientist has shown that recently reported unexpected behavior on Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, is due to its unique atmospheric chemistry. (2017-11-21)

Airless worms: A new hope against drug-resistant parasites
Toronto scientists have uncovered a metabolic pathway that only exists in parasitic worms. This will allow development of drugs that target parasites only without harming the human host. (2019-07-02)

Detecting cyanide exposure
Cyanide exposure can happen occupationally or in low levels from inhaling cigarette smoke -- or from being poisoned by someone out to get you. The effects are fast and can be deadly. But because cyanide is metabolized quickly, it can be difficult to detect in time for an antidote to be administered. Now, in an animal study in ACS' Chemical Research in Toxicology, researchers report a new precise and accurate biomarker of cyanide exposure. (2019-02-27)

Natural plant defense genes provide clues to safener protection in grain sorghum
Weeds often emerge at the same time as vulnerable crop seedlings and sneak between plants as crops grow. How do farmers kill them without harming the crops themselves? In a new University of Illinois study, researchers identify genes and metabolic pathways responsible for safener efficacy in grain sorghum. (2019-03-21)

Breakthrough in industrial CO2 usage
Professor Arne Skerra of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has succeeded for the first time in using gaseous CO2 as a basic material for the production of a chemical mass product in a biotechnical reaction. The product is methionine, which is used as an essential amino acid, particularly in animal feed, on a large scale. This newly developed enzymatic process could replace its current petrochemical production. The results have been published in 'Nature Catalysis'. (2018-07-26)

The almond tree's secret weapon
Has the almond tree developed a unique way of drawing potential pollinators? A group of researchers at the department of environmental and evolutionary biology and the department of science education at the University of Haifa-Oranim speculate that the toxin called amygdalin that is found in almond tree nectar is in fact an evolutionary development intended to give that tree an advantage over others in its surroundings. (2010-01-28)

How the Nazis invented nerve agents like sarin (video)
Nerve agents are arguably the most brutal chemical weapons. These infamous compounds, which include sarin gas and VX, originated in Nazi Germany when a chemist was trying to develop a more effective insecticide. Marrying the element phosphorus with cyanide derivatives resulted in a poison so deadly it was named 'Tabun,' derived from the German word for 'taboo.' Learn more about the history of nerve agents in the latest Speaking of Chemistry. (2017-06-01)

RUDN chemists propose new beneficial catalyst for initial materials in pharmacy
The collaboration of researchers from RUDN University, Centro de QuĂ­mica Estrutura and Baku State University proposes a new potential way to produce initial compounds for many chemical industries, including pharmacy, cosmetics, dyes and liquid crystals production. The new method of synthesis at a room temperature with high yields described in two articles published in Journal of Organometallic Chemistry and in Inorganica Chimica Acta. (2017-09-27)

Chemical trail on Titan may be key to prebiotic conditions
Cornell scientists have uncovered a chemical trail that suggests prebiotic conditions may exist on Saturn's moon, Titan. (2016-07-06)

Bio-based compound offers a greener carbon fiber alternative
From cars and bicycles to airplanes and space shuttles, manufacturers around the world are trying to make these vehicles lighter, which helps lower fuel use and lessen the environmental footprint. But with the industry relying on petroleum products to make carbon fiber today, could we instead use renewable sources? (2018-01-09)

Scientists identify exoplanets where life could develop as it did on Earth
Scientists have identified a group of planets outside our solar system where the same chemical conditions that may have led to life on Earth exist. (2018-08-01)

Underwater power generation
Underwater vehicles, diving robots, and detectors require their own energy supply to operate for long periods independent of ships. A new, inexpensive system for the direct electrochemical extraction of energy from seawater offers the advantage of also being able to handle short spikes in power demand, while maintaining longer term steady power. To do so, the system can autonomously switch between two modes of operation, as researchers report in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2019-05-13)

First detection of gases in super-Earth atmosphere
The first successful detection of gases in the atmosphere of a super-Earth reveals the presence of hydrogen and helium, but no water vapor, according to UCL researchers. The exotic exoplanet, 55 Cancri e, is over eight times the mass of Earth and has previously been dubbed the 'diamond planet' because models based on its mass and radius have led some astronomers to speculate that its interior is carbon-rich. (2016-02-16)

Comparing the jaws of porcupine fish reveals three new species
Researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and colleagues compared fossil porcupine fish jaws and tooth plates collected on expeditions to Panama, Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil with those from museum specimens and modern porcupine fish, revealing three new species. (2017-08-16)

Prussian blue linked to the origin of life
A team of researchers from the Astrobiology Centre has shown that hydrogen cyanide, urea and other substances considered essential to the formation of the most basic biological molecules can be obtained from the salt Prussian blue. In order to carry out this study, published in the journal Chemistry & Biodiversity, the scientists recreated the chemical conditions of the early Earth. (2009-12-14)

How to clamp down on cyanide fishing
Spraying cyanide in tropical seas can quickly and cheaply stun fish, allowing them to be easily captured and sold. But most countries where aquarium fish are collected have outlawed the method, which damages corals. Catching perpetrators, however, is difficult. Now researchers are developing a handheld device for detecting cyanide fishing that could help clamp down on the destructive practice. They're reporting their work at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2017-04-03)

Brewing up Earth's earliest life
MIT planetary scientists led by Sukrit Ranjan find large concentrations of sulfites and bisulfites in shallow lakes may have set the stage for synthesizing Earth's first life forms. (2018-04-09)

Alien imposters: Planets with oxygen don't necessarily have life
Lab simulations nix the common wisdom that atmospheric oxygen and organic compounds are good evidence that a planet harbors life. (2018-12-17)

NASA team finds noxious ice cloud on saturn's moon titan
Researchers with NASA's Cassini mission found evidence of a toxic hybrid ice in a wispy cloud high above the south pole of Saturn's largest moon, Titan. (2017-10-18)

First detection of super-Earth atmosphere
For the first time astronomers were able to analyse the atmosphere of an exoplanet in the class known as super-Earths. Using data gathered with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and new analysis techniques, the exoplanet 55 Cancri e is revealed to have a dry atmosphere without any indications of water vapour. The results, to be published in the Astrophysical Journal, indicate that the atmosphere consists mainly of hydrogen and helium. (2016-02-16)

U of M researchers discover fast-acting cyanide antidote
University of Minnesota Center for Drug Design and Minneapolis VA Medical Center researchers have discovered a new fast-acting antidote to cyanide poisoning. The antidote has potential to save lives of those who are exposed to the chemical -- namely firefighters, industrial workers and victims of terrorist attacks. (2007-12-27)

How to practice safer sunscreening
Scientists are using nanoparticle screening on personal care products and finding previously thought toxic chemicals may not be harmful. In Biomicrofluidics, researchers discuss their work successfully using microchips to demonstrate titanium dioxide, a chemical found in most sunscreens, not only is nontoxic but also offers protection against ultraviolet damage to skin cells. (2019-08-27)

Simple and cost-effective extraction of rare metals from industrial waste
Researchers from Kanazawa University developed a protocol to efficiently purify palladium and silver ions from industrial waste, and convert the ions into pure metallic elements. This will help increase global stock of valuable elements that are widely needed yet in scarce supply. (2020-12-18)

Towards the mechanism of cell respiration
Researchers at the Institute of Biotechnology of the University of Helsinki have for the first time identified an internal electron transfer reaction that initiates the proton pump mechanism of the respiratory enzyme. These new results are published in the Thursday (April 6th) issue of Nature. (2006-04-06)

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