Popular Cytokines News and Current Events

Popular Cytokines News and Current Events, Cytokines News Articles.
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New knowledge on the development of asthma
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have studied which genes are expressed in overactive immune cells in mice with asthma-like inflammation of the airways. Their results, which are published in the journal Immunity, suggest that the synthesis and breakdown of fats plays an important part in the process. (2019-06-26)

Studies suggest inflammatory cytokines are associated with depression and psychosis, and that anti-cytokine treatment can reduce depression symptoms
Studies presented at this year's International Early Psychosis Association meeting in Milan, Italy, (Oct. 20-22) suggest that increased levels of inflammatory cytokines are associated with increased rates of depression and psychosis, and that treatment to reduce cytokine levels can reduce symptoms of depression. (2016-10-20)

Danish-American research presents new ways of developing treatment of chronic inflammation
Researchers from Aarhus University Hospital and Aarhus University in Denmark in collaboration with researchers from Colorado in the United States have found a new way to treat the inflammation involved in chronic diseases such as psoriasis, asthma and HIV. A group of transmitter substances (cytokines) in the immune system, the so-called IL-1 family, has been shown to play an important role in many of these diseases by regulating the body's immune responses. (2019-08-30)

WVU biostatistician studies link between microbiome and preterm birth
Pregnant African American women are more likely than white women to give birth prematurely, but they're underrepresented in studies of preterm birth rates. Snehalata Huzurbazar, a biostatistics professor in the West Virginia University School of Public Health, is working to change that. (2019-05-29)

Cardiovascular disease: The immune response to heart attacks
The damage caused by a heart attack triggers an inflammatory reaction which degrades the affected tissue. This response is orchestrated by immune cells that reside in the nearby pericardial adipose tissue, as a study by a team of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich shows. (2017-11-28)

Protection against Malaria: A matter of balance
A balanced production of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines at two years of age protects against clinical malaria in early childhood, according to a study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by ''la Caixa'' Foundation. The results also indicated that early exposure to the parasite does not affect the risk of developing the disease, although it could affect the parasite-specific immune response later in life. (2018-11-14)

Gut check: Metabolites shed by intestinal microbiota keep inflammation at bay
Researchers have elucidated a mechanism by which 'good' bacteria that reside in our gastrointestinal tract can help protect us from inflammation, and how their disruption (dysbiosis) can increase the susceptibility of the liver to more harmful forms of disease. Their study, now available in the journal Cell Reports, identified two key metabolites produced by the bacteria in mice that modulate inflammation in the host and could ultimately reduce the severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. (2018-05-04)

Secretome of pleural effusions associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and malignant meso
Cryopreserved cell-free PE fluid from 101 NSCLC patients, 8 mesothelioma and 13 with benign PE was assayed for a panel of 40 cytokines/chemokines using the Luminex system. (2019-11-05)

Antibiotics can inhibit skin lymphoma
New research from the LEO Foundation Skin Immunology Research Center at the University of Copenhagen shows, surprisingly, that antibiotics inhibit cancer in the skin in patients with rare type of lymphoma. (2019-07-25)

Study describes potential clinical test and treatment for preterm birth
Scientists identified a molecular driver of inflammation that may finally answer a key question about what causes mild systemic prenatal infections to trigger preterm birth. The finding is an important step to developing a treatment or clinical test for early detection of an entrenched global health problem, according to researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, who report their data March 9 in The Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight (JCI Insight). (2017-03-09)

Nature of immune cells in the human brain disclosed
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience and Amsterdam UMC have disclosed the nature of how T cells protect the brain against harmful viruses. The results of the study, which are published in Nature Communications, are important for investigating the role of the immune system in numerous brain disorders. (2018-11-02)

New biomarkers of multiple sclerosis pathogenesis
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic debilitating inflammatory disease targeting the brain. The pathogenesis of MS remains largely unknown. It is believed that brain tissue damage is due to immune cells targeting and breaking up the myelin basic protein (MBP), which is essential for nerve cells function. (2017-05-19)

Unraveling how mesenchymal stem cells from gum tissue accelerate wound healing
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania set out to determine whether and how gum-derived stem cells play a role in accelerated wound healing. Their results, indicating that these cells secrete tiny vesicles packed with signaling proteins, point the way forward for therapeutic strategies that aim to harness the prowess of stem cells to treat delayed wound healing as well as other conditions that involve an overactive inflammatory response, such as autoimmune diseases. (2018-03-14)

Study finds association between mother's larger waist size, child's autism risk
A new study finds children born to mothers who had a larger waist size before pregnancy may be more likely to have autism than those whose mothers had a smaller pre-pregnancy waist. The research results will be presented Monday, March 19, at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill. (2018-03-19)

Marrow-derived stem cells deliver new cytokine to kill brain tumor cells, offer protection
Gliomas are highly invasive brain tumors with poorly defined borders. Cancer cells separate from the main tumor and migrate to form satellites that escape treatment and often lead to recurrence. An article in the March 1, 2006 issue of Cancer Research reports on an animal study in which bone-marrow derived neural stem cells and a newly discovered cytokine worked synergistically to track and kill glioma cells and offer long-term protection. (2006-03-01)

Do bacterial combinations result in enhanced cytokine production? No!
A comparative study of six different probiotic bacteria strains that induce cytokine production has found that the probiotic S. thermophilus and Leuconostoc strains are more potent inducers of Th1 type cytokines IL-12 and IFN-ƒ× than the probiotic Lactobacillus strains. Bacterial combinations do not result in enhanced cytokine production. (2008-03-18)

Uncovering the mechanisms that support the spread of ovarian cancer
In this issue of the JCI, research led by Wang Min at Yale University describes how a subtype of macrophages communicate with and support tumor cell growth to drive metastasis in ovarian cancer. (2016-10-10)

Obstructive sleep apnea linked to inflammation, organ dysfunction
In the study, 'Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Inflammation: Proof of Concept Based on Two Illustrative Cytokines,' published recently in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences, researchers examined the link between obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and inflammation and the ensuing damage caused to organs. They concluded that OSAS promotes a persistent low-intensity inflammatory state. (2019-02-12)

Biomarkers may predict Zika-related birth defects
The highest risk of birth defects is from Zika virus infection during the first and second trimester. A prenatal test has the potential to relieve the concerns of many expectant mothers (2018-11-02)

How viruses disarm the immune system
How do viruses that cause chronic infections, such as HIV or hepatitis c virus, manage to outsmart their hosts' immune systems? The answer to that question has long eluded scientists, but new research from McGill University has uncovered a molecular mechanism that may be a key piece of the puzzle. The discovery could provide new targets for treating a wide range of diseases. (2018-02-05)

Cell chat: Attacking disease by learning the language of cells
Breakthrough miniature biosensor offers unprecedented insights into how individual cells behave, allowing scientists to isolate single cells, analyze them in real time and observe their complex signalling behavior without disturbing their environment. (2018-05-28)

Scientists block the siren call of two aggressive cancers
Aggressive cancers like glioblastoma and metastatic breast cancer have in common a siren call that beckons the bone marrow to send along whatever the tumors need to survive and thrive. (2018-01-23)

Newly-discovered anti-inflammatory substances may potentially treat variety of diseases
Researchers have discovered a new family of substances which has been found to display highly potent activity against the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the toxicity induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The novel compounds synthesized and evaluated belong to a family of low molecular weight substances named indolines. In early experiments, these compounds have shown promising activity in the treatment of acute pancreatic inflammation, acute fatty liver damage, and diabetes. (2018-05-03)

Probiotic bacteria can induce monocyte-derived dendritic cells maturation?
Probiotic bacteria are defined as living microorganisms that have beneficial effects on human health. The mechanisms behind these actions are not yet fully characterized. A group in Finland investigated the capacity of nine probiotic bacteria to induce the maturation and the production of cytokines in human dendritic cells. The ability to induce cytokine production in leukocytes may exemplify one of the health promoting effects of probiotic bacteria. (2008-09-24)

ILCregs play an important role in regulation of intestinal inflammation
Researchers from FAN Zusen's group at the Institute of Biophysics (IBP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have identified a regulatory subpopulation of ILCs (called ILCregs) that exist in the gut and harbor a unique genetic identity distinct from ILCs or regulatory T cells (Tregs). (2017-08-24)

Mechanism that affects multiplication of dengue virus lineage is discovered
A study aiming at the development of a dengue vaccine shows that the prevalence of a virus lineage upon the other does not rely on the highest replication rate: it is rather based on the virus' ability in triggering weaker activation of the patient's immune response. (2018-08-15)

Yoga and meditation improve mind-body health and stress resilience
A new research article published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience investigates the effects of yoga and meditation on people by looking at physiological and immunological markers of stress and inflammation. By studying the participants of an intensive three-month yoga and meditation retreat, the researchers found that the practices positively impacted physiological and immunological markers of stress and inflammation, and in addition improved subjective wellbeing. (2017-08-22)

Inflammatory signals in heart muscle cells linked to atrial fibrillation
Interfering with inflammatory signals produced by heart muscle cells might someday provide novel therapeutic strategies for atrial fibrillation, according to an international team of researchers. (2018-06-04)

Selective suppression of inflammation could deplete HIV and control HIV activation
A class of anti-inflammatory drugs already FDA-approved for rheumatoid arthritis could 'purge' the reservoir of infected immune cells in people infected by HIV, according to new research. (2017-12-21)

Cellular mechanism for severe viral hepatitis identified
KAIST medical scientists identified a cellular mechanism causing inflammatory changes in regulatory T cells that can lead to severe viral hepatitis. Research on this mechanism will help further understand the nature of various inflammatory diseases and lead to the development of relevant clinical treatments. (2018-01-18)

Treating muscle wasting improved cancer survival
Researchers from the University of Jyväskylä in Finland have found that continued treatment of muscle wasting with a soluble growth factor receptor protein, produced at the University of Helsinki, improved survival in a preclinical cancer model without affecting the tumor size. This effect was not found when the mice were treated with the recombinant protein only prophylactically before cancer. (2018-05-15)

Important signaling pathway in breast cancer revealed
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) that a particular signaling pathway in breast-cancer tumors causes cancer cells to divide symmetrically, expanding the tumor. Inhibiting the pathway by drugs could become a strategy for eliminating the cancer cells. (2019-01-24)

Study uncovers markers for severe form of multiple sclerosis
New Haven, Conn. -- Scientists have uncovered two closely related cytokines -- molecules involved in cell communication and movement -- that may explain why some people develop progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), the most severe form of the disease. The findings, authored by researchers at Yale University, Ohio Health & Science University, and the University of California point the way toward developing a novel treatment to prevent progressive forms of the disease. (2017-09-18)

Scientists unravel likely causes of blood vessel leakage in severe dengue
A protein secreted by cells infected with dengue virus can cause dangerous leakage of fluid from blood vessels, and new research published in PLOS Pathogens supports a primary underlying mechanism: disruption of a molecular barrier that lines the vessels. (2017-11-09)

Escort service: The role of immune cells in the formation of metastases
Tumor cells use a certain type of immune cells, the so-called neutrophils, to enhance their ability to form metastases. Scientists have deciphered the mechanisms of this collaboration and found strategies for blocking them. This is reported by researchers from the University of Basel and the University Hospital of Basel in the scientific journal Nature. (2019-02-06)

Tumor necrosis associate with atherosclerotic lipid accumulation
Atherosclerosis is regarded as a chronic inflammatory disease associated with changes in the innate immune system functioning and cytokine disturbances. In this study, we explored localization of a pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), and anti-inflammatory chemokine, C-C motif chemokine ligand 18 (CCL18), in the arterial wall of human aorta. (2018-10-05)

Study: Some biologic treatments for psoriasis may be safer for patients
In the largest study of its kind, Erica D. Dommasch, M.D., M.P.H., a dermatologist in the Department of Dermatology at BIDMC, and colleagues found a decreased risk of infection in patients with psoriasis using some of the newer, more targeted medications compared to those taking methotrexate, a drug widely used since the 1960s as a first line treatment for moderate-to-severe psoriasis. (2019-05-10)

NSAID impairs immune response in heart failure, worsens heart and kidney damage
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, are widely known as pain-killers and can relieve pain and inflammation. In a study published in the journal Life Sciences, researchers found that treatment with the NSAID carprofen alone triggered subtle low-grade inflammation in the heart and kidneys. The combination of carprofen pretreatment and heart attack magnified this impact by dysregulating the acute inflammatory response, amplifying inflammation and intensifying the cardiorenal syndrome. (2019-02-06)

Neural inflammation plays critical role in stress-induced depression
A group of Japanese researchers has discovered that neural inflammation caused by our innate immune system plays an unexpectedly important role in stress-induced depression. This insight could potentially lead to the development of new antidepressants targeting innate immune molecules. The findings were published on July 20 (Japan Standard Time) in the online edition of Neuron. (2018-07-19)

Treating inflammatory bowel disorder by delivering microRNAs
Osaka University researchers efficiently delivered miRNAs to immune response cells in inflamed intestinal tracts using a super carbonate apatite (sCA), which had been shown to be highly effective in the delivery of nucleic acids to solid tumors, demonstrating the efficacy of sCA in the prevention and treatment of colitis in mice. (2018-08-28)

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